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  • Falls by older adults are common and usually multifactorial. Falls are associated with functional decline. Prevention of falls in older adults is better than treatment. Screening for fall risk factors is essential to create customized preventive interventions and is very effective. Falls prevention guidelines by different health organizations and their recommendation for multifactorial interventions are available.

    Summary: Falls by older adults are common and usually multifactorial. Falls are associated with functional decline. Prevention of falls in older adults is better than treatment. Screening for fall risk factors is essential to create customized preventive interventions and is very effective. Falls prevention guidelines by different health organizations and their recommendation for multifactorial interventions are available.

    Objectives: At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to…

    • Identify the risk factors of falls in older adults
    • Understand the consequences and complications of falls in older adults
    • Recognize the importance of falls screening in older adults
    • Learn how to assess, evaluate, and prevent falls in older people

    Intended Audience: Health Care providers- Physicians, Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants/Associates, Nurses, MPH Students, and Others e.g. Physical Therapist, Social Workers, etc.

    Ali, Lobna H., MD

    Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine

    Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

    Doctor Lobna Ali is a board-certified physician in family medicine and geriatrics. She is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine and the Associate Program Director of the Geriatric Fellowship at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans. Dr. Ali is a Certified Medical Director and serves as the Medical Director of the Audubon Retirement Village in New Orleans. Dr. Ali is an active member of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and a member of the AGS’s Public Education Committee. She is also an active member of the Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (AMDA) and is a member of the AMDA’s Education Committee. She has been the vice president of the Louisiana Geriatrics Society (LGS) since 2020. Dr. Ali has devoted herself to serving the needs of older adults throughout her professional career. Her philosophy of care centers on patients and their safety. As a geriatrician, she aims to restore patients’ independence and improve their quality of life.

  • This webinar will introduce participants to current challenges in the commercial fishing industry and how they are impacting the mental health and well-being of commercial fishermen and their communities. The presenters will also share resources that are available (and in the process of being created) that are intended to promote mental health awareness and provide resources for fishermen seeking support.

    Summary: This webinar will introduce participants to current challenges in the commercial fishing industry and how they are impacting the mental health and well-being of commercial fishermen and their communities. The presenters will also share resources that are available (and in the process of being created) that are intended to promote mental health awareness and provide resources for fishermen seeking support.

    Intended Audience: This presentation is for anyone interested in better understanding the needs of the commercial fishing community, and the work that is being done to support fishermen and their communities.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    • Have a general understanding of challenges that affect the mental and physical health of individuals who earn their living from fishing.
    • Learn about work that has been done to support the mental and physical health of commercial fishermen.
    • Find helpful resources that are available (or in the process of being made available) to support the work of providers interested in working with the commercial fishing community, or for anyone who wants to know more about health and wellness in the fishing community in general. (i.e., Fishing Forward podcast, FishAbility, ManTherapy)

    Monique Coombs

    Director of Community Programs

    Maine Coast Fishermen’s Association

    Monique Coombs is the Director of Community Programs for the Maine Coast Fishermen’s Association. She has been a part of the commercial fishing community for nearly two decades (and is married to a commercial fisherman). Her work has focused on seafood distribution, working waterfront, and wellness. Currently, she runs a program at the MCFA focusing on Fishermen Wellness, partnering with organizations like the Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety, NAMI Maine, and Access Health to identify and build resources specifically for the commercial fishing community, and to help educate behavioral health specialists on the needs of the fishing community.

    Mandy Roome, PhD

    Research Scientist

    Bassett Healthcare Network

    Amanda (Mandy) Roome is a research scientist at the Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in agriculture, forestry, and fishing. She works with
    commercial fishermen to determine ways to improve the health and safety of the industry. She has worked on a lifejacket initiative, working with commercial lobstermen in the Northeast to identify lifejackets that are both comfortable and feasible for them to work in. More recently, she has been teaming up with MCFA and Man Therapy to develop mental health resources geared toward commercial fishermen.

  • This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. The young ag producer works in an environment with noise hazards and plays in an environment with noise hazards. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is common (and preventable) but unfortunately, use of hearing protection among youth is not.

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. The young ag producer works in an environment with noise hazards and plays in an environment with noise hazards. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is common (and preventable) but unfortunately, use of hearing protection among youth is not. 

    By the end of the Train the Trainer session, participants/educators will be able to: 
    - Understand the pathophysiology of hearing loss 
    - Recognize the importance of preventing noise induced hearing loss 
    - Use the Invest in Your Health training materials and classroom activities to teach hearing loss prevention

    Other available Train the Trainer Modules include:

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    Marjorie McCullagh, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC, COHN-S, FAAOHN, FAAN

    Professor and Occupational Health Nursing Program Director, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    Marjorie McCullagh is Professor in the School of Nursing. She holds a PhD in nursing from the University of Michigan and has 20 years of clinical, teaching, and research experience in hearing conservation. Dr. McCullagh's career has focused on occupational health and safety, particularly as it relates to use of personal protection devices among farm operators and their families. Since 1985 she has had an active program of research in mitigating hazardous occupational exposures. She has conducted several randomized clinical trials, comparing the effectiveness of several approaches to influencing use of personal protective equipment. Dr. McCullagh is an associate professor and Director of the Occupational Health Nursing program at the University of Michigan School of Nursing.

  • Summary: Caring for both the physical and emotional health of our next generation is crucial. From adapting to changes to feeling overwhelmed, like adults, children also experience stress and anxiety; however, they may be unsure of what they are feeling and how to respond. During this webinar, we will take a closer look at the status of farm youth mental health. We will recognize causes of stress among youth living in farming and rural communities and highlight the resources available to assist families.

    Summary: Caring for both the physical and emotional health of our next generation is crucial. From adapting to changes to feeling overwhelmed, like adults, children also experience stress and anxiety; however, they may be unsure of what they are feeling and how to respond. During this webinar, we will take a closer look at the status of farm youth mental health. We will recognize causes of stress among youth living in farming and rural communities and highlight the resources available to assist families.

    Intended Audience: Extension, practitioners, educators, farming/rural families, etc. 

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to...
    - Describe the status of farm youth's mental health including the prevalence of anxiety and depression. 
    - Recognize common and unique reasons or causes of stress among youth living in farming and rural communities.
    - Identify mental health and wellness resources available to assist farm families and where to locate them.

    Josie Rudolphi, PhD

    Assistant Professor/Extension Specialist

    University of Illinois

    Josie M. Rudolphi, PhD, is an assistant professor and Extension specialist in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Rudolphi’s research quantifies the burden of mental health conditions among agricultural populations, identifies risk and protective factors, and considers socio-ecological interventions. She is the director of the North Central Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance, a 12-state collaborative that increases and expands stress and mental health services to agricultural producers, workers, and their families

    Jana Davidson, M.Ed.

    Program Manager

    Progressive Agriculture Foundation

    As Program Manager, Jana Davidson leads the Foundation’s program team overseeing day-to-day and long-range program operations, while continuing to strengthen the overall reach, impact, and outcomes of the Progressive Agriculture Safety Day® programs. She guides the program staff through ongoing efforts to reach more children, families, and communities throughout North America to best align with the ongoing needs in rural and farming landscapes. Davidson received her Bachelor of Science degree from the Pennsylvania State University in Agribusiness Management and went on to earn a Master of Education specializing in Teaching & Curriculum. Davidson believes in the mission of the PAF Safety Day program in helping provide practical solutions through hands-on education and resources to overcome the problem of preventable injuries and fatalities among youth living, working, and visiting farms. She has been a volunteer with the PAF Safety Day program since 2005 and continues to coordinate a PAF Safety Days in her local community.

  • Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farm workers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team and effectively communicating within that team are essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Summary: Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farmworkers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team, and effectively communicating within that team is essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Intended Audience: Supervisor or Managers: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns, and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    • Define zoonotic disease and identify various modes of transmission
    • Identify a minimum of four significant zoonotic diseases affecting the production agricultural population
    • Discuss warning signs and symptoms of major zoonotic diseases which have adverse effects for reproductive health
    • Locate a minimum of three recommended educational resources for use in training an agricultural workforce

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health Program Director, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Public Health Program Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.