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  • What Ag Producers Need to Know About COVID19 (Recording)

    Coronavirus has gained attention worldwide as an emerging infectious disease. This webinar shares evidence-based information about COVID19 and helps agricultural producers identify strategies for responding on their farm.

    Summary
    Coronavirus has gained attention worldwide as an emerging infectious disease. This webinar is intended to share evidence-based information about COVID19 and to help agricultural producers identify strategies for responding on their farm.
    Intended Audience
    Agricultural producers, ranchers, farmers, farmworkers, veterinarians, Extension personnel, rural health care providers, and others who work in agriculture.
    Objectives
    At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:
    • be aware of common signs and symptoms of COVID-19
    • understand the transmission risk to yourself, employees, and potentially your animals
    • describe infection control principles and appropriate strategies for limiting disease transmission
    • locate resources and training for ag producers related to infection prevention
    To view the recording click on the "Contents" tab above.
    The audio from this webinar is also available as a podcast. Check it out here...

    Thank you to our generous sponsor for supporting this webinar:
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    Heather Fowler, VMD PhD MPH DACVPM

    Director of Producer and Public Health, National Pork Board

    Dr. Fowler completed her Veterinary Medical degree at the University Of Pennsylvania School Of Veterinary Medicine in 2010, a Master in Public Health in Applied Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health in 2011, and a PhD in Environmental and Occupational Hygiene from the University of Washington School of Public Health in 2017. She is board certified in veterinary preventive medicine and has expertise in the areas of zoonotic disease, public health, worker safety and health, and One Health application. In the summer of 2017, Heather began work as the Director of Producer and Public Health at the National Pork Board where she oversees public health as well as occupational safety and health issues as they relate to swine production in the United States.

    Chad Roy, PhD, MSPH

    Director, Infectious Disease Aerobiology, Director, Biodefense Research Programs at the Tulane National Primate Research Center, Professor of Microbiology & Immunology, Tulane School of Medicine

    Dr.Roy is a professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Tulane University Schoolof Medicine and also the Director of Infectious Disease Aerobiology at theTulane National Primate Research Center. Dr. Roy's research focuses onrespiratory health and the aerobiology of infectious diseases.  Dr. Roy isa career aerobiologist, and has been active in numerous investigations for anarray of high consequence pathogens over the years.  Currently, Dr. Royand his laboratory enterprise are heavily engaged in the COVID-19 response incooperation with the US NIH, CDC, and other international partners.  Heserves on numerous ad hoc SME panels contributing to the ongoingresponse to COVID-19, including as an invited panelist with the World HealthOrganizations’ (WHO) committee on development of animal models for futuretesting of medical countermeasures.    

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte Halverson is an occupational health nurse for the AgriSafe Network and serves as the network’s Clinical Director. In that capacity, she researches, develops resources, and presents webinar and in person educational sessions on a variety of health and safety topics specific to the agricultural workforce. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

    Jeff Bender, DVM, MS DACVPM

    Professor and Director of the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center (UMASH), School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

    Dr. Bender is a professor in both Veterinary Public Health and the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota. He is also a Hospital Epidemiologist with the Veterinary Medical Center at the U of MN and the Co-Director of the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center.

    Dr. Bender's research interests include zoonoses and emerging diseases, food safety, antimicrobial resistance, infectious disease surveillance, and infection prevention and control. 

    Mike Keenan

    Risk Control Manager

    Mike Keenan is a Risk Control Manager for Gallagher National Risk Control in Omaha Nebraska. Mike has worked extensively with agricultural clients throughout the Midwest for over 13 years. His clients include swine producers, dairy operations, cattle feeders, feed mills, grain elevators, coops and meat packing plants. Mike also has over 30 years of experience with the construction and general industry. Mike has been developing and implementing Enhanced Risk Management Programs to identify risk exposures and controls in animal agriculture and affiliated industries. Mike serves as an advisor to the Central States Center for Ag Safety and Health, and a NIOSH fund research program for employee safety in cattle feed yards. Mike is a tech committee member for the National Fire Protection Association 150 Code Life Safety for Animal Housing Facilities, and is a member of the National Pork Producers Safety Roundtable.  

  • Helping Farmers Weather the Storm of Emotions + Economics: NY Farmnet (Recorded December 16, 2019)

    NY FarmNet, a Cornell University program, helps farmers in New York state navigate the waters of growth, change, and crisis. Since 1986, NY FarmNet has provided free, confidential on farm consulting to thousands of farmers and their families. With its unique, holistic approach - offering both financial and family/personal guidance - the program is able to help farm families work through a multitude of challenges that may be affecting the farm business. This webinar will discuss the impact of NY FarmNet's work, as well as some best practices for working with and engaging farmers. Learning Objectives: 1. Gain insight on providing direct counseling services to farmers. 2. Recognize the benefits of addressing both the financial and emotional sides of farm businesses. 3. Identify existing networks to support farmers and farm families.

    NY FarmNet, a Cornell University program, helps farmers in New York state navigate the waters of growth, change, and crisis. Since 1986, NY FarmNet has provided free, confidential on farm consulting to thousands of farmers and their families. With its unique, holistic approach - offering both financial and family/personal guidance - the program is able to help farm families work through a multitude of challenges that may be affecting the farm business. This webinar will discuss the impact of NY FarmNet's work, as well as some best practices for working with and engaging farmers.
    Learning Objectives:
    1. Gain insight on providing direct counseling services to farmers.
    2. Recognize the benefits of addressing both the financial and emotional sides of farm businesses.
    3. Identify existing networks to support farmers and farm families. 


    Funded through the generous support of:

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    Federal Office of Rural Health Policy

    Brenda O'Brien

    Family Consultant, NY FarmNet

    Brenda O'Brien was born and raised on a large dairy farm in Central New York. She worked side by side with her father and learned about the farm finances. While she was earning a Bachelor's in Economics and Management Science from the State University of New York at Cortland, she began managing the farm finances, human resources, and herd management aspects of the farm business. She later moved to Northern Virginia where she worked for the United States Department of Agriculture and then for the Maryland & Virginia Milk Cooperative. Brenda continued her education, earning her Master's degree in Counseling, which has proven to be invaluable with her work for more than 20 years in her church community and adult education. She is a trained facilitator in both Youth and Adult Mental Health First Aid. With her lifelong experience in agriculture, working on the family farm, and caring for her five children, Brenda brings a unique and valuable perspective to NY FarmNet.

    Kate Downes

    Outreach Director, NY FarmNet

    Kate Downes is the Outreach Director for NY FarmNet, a program based at Cornell University that provides free, confidential, on-farm guidance to any farmer in New York State. NY FarmNet works with farmers and their families in a holistic way to achieve both business and personal goals. In her role, she has become a leader on rural and farmer mental health. She works cooperatively to provide resources and support systems within New York agriculture by telling the story of rural New Yorkers and sharing their unique culture. Kate's work is shaped by a passion for community and an agricultural connection spanning back to her childhood. She earned her Bachelor’s in Agricultural Business at the State University of New York, College of Agriculture and Technology at Cobleskill. Through a series of left turns into journalism and public relations, Kate returned to university to earn her Master of Science degree in Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development at University College Dublin, Ireland. She has been trained in both Adult and Youth Mental Health First Aid, as well as Michigan State University Extension’s Communicating with Farmers Under Stress and Weathering the Storm in Agriculture: How Farmers Can Cultivate a Productive Mindset. She is a LEAD NY Class 18 Fellow, and serves on the advisory board of NY Agriculture in the Classroom. Featured in the New York Times, Successful Farming, The Rural Monitor, Spectrum News, and many others, Kate shares her experiences in hopes of breaking down the behavioral health stigma and helping the agricultural community to thrive. She is the mother of two and the wife of one - and she balances it all by getting outdoors, crafting, adventuring, and trying to figure out what just came in her CSA box.

  • Providing Culturally Competent Care for Farmers and Farm Families, With Emphasis on Mental Well-Being

    Alarming rates of suicide among production farmers have prompted public health officials to increase the awareness and cultural understanding of providing wholistic care for those in rural agricultural areas. Unique aspects of farm life and farming can contribute to higher levels of depressive symptoms and increased stress. Higher levels of depression, in addition to suicide, can also increase a farmer’s risk of injury and development of chronic disease, impacting overall quality of life. The agrarian culture is one of strong work ethic, self-sufficiency, conservative views, and adherence to gender roles, which can make discussion of mental well-being distinctly different from clients who are not from the agrarian culture. The training module will seek to provide insight on the aspects of providing healthcare for farmers and farm families as it relates to the culture and occupational aspects of farming and farm life. Objectives: By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: Have a greater understanding of the agrarian culture. Apply key concepts of the culture when proving healthcare for farmers and farm families. Identify barriers of seeking mental wellness in a rural, agricultural community

     Alarming rates of suicide among production farmers have prompted public health officials to increase the awareness and cultural understanding of providing wholistic care for those in rural agricultural areas. Unique aspects of farm life and farming can contribute to higher levels of depressive symptoms and increased stress. Higher levels of depression, in addition to suicide, can also increase a farmer’s risk of injury and development of chronic disease, impacting overall quality of life. The agrarian culture is one of strong work ethic, self-sufficiency, conservative views, and adherence to gender roles, which can make discussion of mental well-being distinctly different from clients who are not from the agrarian culture. The training module will seek to provide insight on the aspects of providing healthcare for farmers and farm families as it relates to the culture and occupational aspects of farming and farm life.
    Objectives:
    By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:
    1. Have a greater understanding of the agrarian culture.
    2. Apply key concepts of the culture when proving healthcare for farmers and farm families.
    3. Identify barriers of seeking mental wellness in a rural, agricultural community 


    Funded through the generous support of:

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    Federal Office of Rural Health Policy

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    Cheryl Dean-Witt, PhD, RN

    Primary Investigator, Eating Healthy in the Mountains