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  • Summary: Caring for both the physical and emotional health of our next generation is crucial. From adapting to changes to feeling overwhelmed, like adults, children also experience stress and anxiety; however, they may be unsure of what they are feeling and how to respond. During this webinar, we will take a closer look at the status of farm youth mental health. We will recognize causes of stress among youth living in farming and rural communities and highlight the resources available to assist families.

    Summary: Caring for both the physical and emotional health of our next generation is crucial. From adapting to changes to feeling overwhelmed, like adults, children also experience stress and anxiety; however, they may be unsure of what they are feeling and how to respond. During this webinar, we will take a closer look at the status of farm youth mental health. We will recognize causes of stress among youth living in farming and rural communities and highlight the resources available to assist families.

    Intended Audience: Extension, practitioners, educators, farming/rural families, etc. 

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to...
    - Describe the status of farm youth's mental health including the prevalence of anxiety and depression. 
    - Recognize common and unique reasons or causes of stress among youth living in farming and rural communities.
    - Identify mental health and wellness resources available to assist farm families and where to locate them.

    Josie Rudolphi, PhD

    Assistant Professor/Extension Specialist

    University of Illinois

    Josie M. Rudolphi, PhD, is an assistant professor and Extension specialist in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Rudolphi’s research quantifies the burden of mental health conditions among agricultural populations, identifies risk and protective factors, and considers socio-ecological interventions. She is the director of the North Central Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance, a 12-state collaborative that increases and expands stress and mental health services to agricultural producers, workers, and their families

    Jana Davidson, M.Ed.

    Program Manager

    Progressive Agriculture Foundation

    As Program Manager, Jana Davidson leads the Foundation’s program team overseeing day-to-day and long-range program operations, while continuing to strengthen the overall reach, impact, and outcomes of the Progressive Agriculture Safety Day® programs. She guides the program staff through ongoing efforts to reach more children, families, and communities throughout North America to best align with the ongoing needs in rural and farming landscapes. Davidson received her Bachelor of Science degree from the Pennsylvania State University in Agribusiness Management and went on to earn a Master of Education specializing in Teaching & Curriculum. Davidson believes in the mission of the PAF Safety Day program in helping provide practical solutions through hands-on education and resources to overcome the problem of preventable injuries and fatalities among youth living, working, and visiting farms. She has been a volunteer with the PAF Safety Day program since 2005 and continues to coordinate a PAF Safety Days in her local community.

  • Summary: Workplace sexual harassment (WSH) in agriculture is a persistent and pervasive problem that threatens employees’ safety and well-being and damages organizational climate and trajectory. Until recently, tailored trainings about WSH and resources specific to the agricultural sector and its audiences were lacking. Over the past several years, researchers and partners with the Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health (PNASH) Center in Washington State have worked with a number of agricultural and industry stakeholders (e.g. farmworkers, growers, government leaders and agencies, legal experts, advocates, etc.), to explore the nature of WSH and to develop relative education, resources, and training. While education alone will not stop WSH, it’s an important strategy in a multi-faceted approach to prevention. In this webinar, participants will be introduced to The Basta! Prevent Sexual Harassment in Agriculture training, toolkit, and video. The Basta! training uses an evidence-based, community engaged approach to help employees, HR staff, and growers prevent and address sexual harassment in the agricultural workplace.

    Summary: 

    Workplace sexual harassment (WSH) in agriculture is a persistent and pervasive problem that threatens employees’  safety and well-being  and damages organizational climate and trajectory. Until recently, tailored trainings about WSH and resources specific to the agricultural sector and its audiences were lacking. Over the past several years, researchers and partners with the Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health (PNASH) Center in Washington State have worked with a number of agricultural and industry stakeholders (e.g. farmworkers, growers, government leaders and agencies, legal experts, advocates, etc.), to explore the nature of WSH and to develop relative education, resources, and training.  While education alone will not stop WSH, it’s an important strategy in a multi-faceted approach to prevention. In this webinar, participants will be introduced to The Basta! Prevent Sexual Harassment in Agriculture training, toolkit, and video. The Basta! training uses an evidence-based, community engaged approach to help employees, HR staff, and growers prevent and address sexual harassment in the agricultural workplace.

    Following the session, the learner will be able to:
    a. Summarize the scope and nature of workplace sexual harassment in agriculture.
    b. Examine multi-level factors that influence sexual harassment in agriculture.
    c. Review employer’s and employees’ rights and responsibilities in reporting and addressing workplace sexual harassment.
    d. Share effective strategies and interventions that can reduce the threat of workplace sexual harassment and strengthen protocols and reporting mechanisms for employee-victims.

    Live interpretation in Spanish will be available for this session.

    Jody Early, Ph.D., M.S., MCHES

    Associate Professor, Faculty Coordinator, Health Education and Promotion Minor, School of Nursing and Health Studies, University of Washington Bothell

    Dr. Jody Early is an Associate Professor of Health Studies and an affiliate faculty in Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies and the Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health Center at the University of Washington Bothell and Seattle campuses. She currently serves as lead faculty for the Health Education and Promotion minor in the School of Nursing and Health Studies and is a former Associate Director of UW Bothell’s Teaching and Learning Center.

     Over the last 25 years, Jody has dedicated her life to improving health equity and higher education. A Master Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES), Jody’s research, teaching and praxis largely explore structural and social ecological factors that impact the health and well-being of individuals and populations, especially among women and Latinx communities. Her work, both in and outside of the academy, has allowed her to collaborate with communities to design, implement, and evaluate, culturally tailored health education interventions and strategies, and to involve her students in the process.

    Dennise Drury, MPH

    Outreach and Education Specialist

    Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health Center (PNASH)

    Dennise Drury is the Outreach and Education Specialist at the Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health Center (PNASH) She has a background in environmental science and a passion for increasing the inclusivity and accessibility of science and research for Latino communities. In her current role, she works in collaboration with researchers, community organizations, and agricultural stakeholders to coordinate the Center's communications and educational activities. She has a passion for developing and evaluating workplace interventions to improve the health and safety of farmworkers. She is currently working on developing an evaluation of the Basta! Prevent Sexual Harassment in Agriculture worksite training and toolkit created in collaboration with the agricultural community.

    Mike Gempler

    Executive Director

    Washington Grower's League

    Mike Gempler is the Executive Director of the Washington Grower’s League. He received a bachelor’s degree in agriculture from Ohio State University and a master’s degree in agricultural economics from the University of Wyoming. Mike is also a graduate of the Washington Agriculture and Forestry Leadership Program and served as a past-president of the National Council of Agricultural Employers (NCAE), based in Washington, DC.

    Alyson Dimmit Gnam

    Attorney

    Northwest Justice Project

    Alyson Dimmitt Gnam is an attorney in the Farmworker Unit at the Northwest Justice Project in Washington State. She represents agricultural employees in sexual harassment claims, as well as discrimination, labor trafficking, and concerted activity cases. She is a member of the steering committee of the sexual harassment peer training project of the BASTA Coalition.

  • Summary: Do farmers or ranchers really retire? Generational family operations frequently include the aging parents, the living legends of agriculture. Farmers and ranchers self-identify good health with the ability to work. The normal aging process slows down one’s ability to engage in meaningful activities physically and mentally, essentially to continue working. Swirl in the postmenopausal issues incurred by the female farmer, and a myriad of health hazards arise.

    Summary: Do farmers or ranchers really retire? Generational family operations frequently include the aging parents, the living legends of agriculture. Farmers and ranchers self-identify good health with the ability to work. The normal aging process slows down one’s ability to engage in meaningful activities physically and mentally, essentially to continue working. Swirl in the postmenopausal issues incurred by the female farmer, and a myriad of health hazards arise.

    Unlike men, who experience a gradual loss of bone mass as they age, women will lose over 30% of their bone mass in the first five years after menopause. Agriculture is a hazardous and uncertain profession. Women are working well past the age of menopause. Training measures should focus on avoiding common risk factors and preventative actions to decrease the likelihood of an injury. Workplace and home safety are achievable. We will also address other age-related changes such as vision, hearing, and sleep disturbance. Every member of the family operation will benefit from learning creative strategies and solutions to help the aging in-place seniors achieve wellness and self-fulfillment.

    Linda Emanuel, RN

    Community Health Nurse, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Good health advocacy has been at the heart of Linda’s essence from her formative years as a farm girl in eastern Nebraska. Graduating from Nebraska Methodist School of Nursing in 1985, she worked as an R.N. in a variety of acute care hospital settings for over 30 years. She and her husband Tom raised three sons on a successful row crop operation that has been able to welcome the next generation and their families home to continue to diversify their family business. Linda served as a Fellow in the Nebraska LEAD program and has also received agrimedicine training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Linda now serves on the advisory board for CS-CASH and a member of the AgriSafe team, as a Community Health Nurse.