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  • Farmers and ranchers in four states (Texas, Wyoming, Pennsylvania, and Virginia) can now access a crisis service helpline 24/7 staffed by trained professionals. Join AgriSafe and ViaLink for a 30-minute overview of this newly formed AgriStress Helpline for Farmers and Ranchers. The AgriStress Helpline is an evidence-based suicide prevention lifeline designed for agricultural communities.

    Farmers and ranchers in four states (Texas, Wyoming, Pennsylvania, and Virginia) can now access a crisis service helpline 24/7 staffed by trained professionals. Join AgriSafe and ViaLink for a 30-minute overview of this newly formed AgriStress Helpline for Farmers and Ranchers.  The AgriStress Helpline is an evidence-based suicide prevention lifeline designed for agricultural communities.

    Participants will learn how:

    This innovative crisis model serves a critical unmet need.
    The model was designed by credentialed professionals trained to respond appropriately to the agricultural community, through a program developed by experts in mental health, agriculture production, mediation, and financial analysis.
    The crisis line utilizes a "care navigation" process where the helpline responders: triage for safety and provide de-escalation using a crisis intervention model; provide emotional support and coping techniques; and, when necessary, direct callers to the appropriate resources for their situation.
    The expansion to new states and eventually a national helpline is both economical and feasible. 

    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN (Moderator)

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

    Sherrard Crespo, LCSW (Moderator)

    Director of Outreach and PCAL, VIA LINK/2-1-1

    Sherrard Crespo is a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) who obtained her Masters Degree in Social Work from Louisiana State University in 2017. Her professional background is highlighted by her work with suicide education, prevention, intervention, and postvention. Sherrard is currently employed with VIA LINK in the position of Director of Outreach and Preventing Child Abuse where her current duties include: clinical oversight of
    VIA LINK's 24/7 contact center, VIA LINK internal training on suicide risk assessment, community outreach and education on VIA LINK services as well as specialized skills and information on suicide, crisis intervention, and trauma. She also facilitates VIA LINK's two support groups: Survivors of Suicide Loss and “Real Talk” a support group for teens with suicide ideation. She is also the director for VIA LINK’s Preventing Child Abuse Program in which her current focus includes education and advocacy for the community to support Louisiana families and prevent child abuse. Her professional clinical skills also include seeing individual clients who are bereaved by suicide loss as well as providing consultation for
    clients who are assessed for suicide risk.

    Natalie Roy, MPH (Moderator)

    AgriSafe Executive Director

    AgriSafe Network

    As Executive Director of AgriSafe for over twenty years, Natalie Roy utilizes her public health training to improve the quality of health care offered to farm families. Natalie holds a Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She is pleased to work in the area of agricultural health as it relates to her experience growing up on a farm in Canterbury New Hampshire.

  • Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farm workers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team and effectively communicating within that team are essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Summary: Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farmworkers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team, and effectively communicating within that team is essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Intended Audience: Supervisor or Managers: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns, and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    • Define zoonotic disease and identify various modes of transmission
    • Identify a minimum of four significant zoonotic diseases affecting the production agricultural population
    • Discuss warning signs and symptoms of major zoonotic diseases which have adverse effects for reproductive health
    • Locate a minimum of three recommended educational resources for use in training an agricultural workforce

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health Program Director, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Public Health Program Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Summary: Do farmers or ranchers really retire? Generational family operations frequently include the aging parents, the living legends of agriculture. Farmers and ranchers self-identify good health with the ability to work. The normal aging process slows down one’s ability to engage in meaningful activities physically and mentally, essentially to continue working. Swirl in the postmenopausal issues incurred by the female farmer, and a myriad of health hazards arise.

    Summary: Do farmers or ranchers really retire? Generational family operations frequently include the aging parents, the living legends of agriculture. Farmers and ranchers self-identify good health with the ability to work. The normal aging process slows down one’s ability to engage in meaningful activities physically and mentally, essentially to continue working. Swirl in the postmenopausal issues incurred by the female farmer, and a myriad of health hazards arise.

    Unlike men, who experience a gradual loss of bone mass as they age, women will lose over 30% of their bone mass in the first five years after menopause. Agriculture is a hazardous and uncertain profession. Women are working well past the age of menopause. Training measures should focus on avoiding common risk factors and preventative actions to decrease the likelihood of an injury. Workplace and home safety are achievable. We will also address other age-related changes such as vision, hearing, and sleep disturbance. Every member of the family operation will benefit from learning creative strategies and solutions to help the aging in-place seniors achieve wellness and self-fulfillment.

    Linda Emanuel, RN

    Community Health Nurse, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Good health advocacy has been at the heart of Linda’s essence from her formative years as a farm girl in eastern Nebraska. Graduating from Nebraska Methodist School of Nursing in 1985, she worked as an R.N. in a variety of acute care hospital settings for over 30 years. She and her husband Tom raised three sons on a successful row crop operation that has been able to welcome the next generation and their families home to continue to diversify their family business. Linda served as a Fellow in the Nebraska LEAD program and has also received agrimedicine training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Linda now serves on the advisory board for CS-CASH and a member of the AgriSafe team, as a Community Health Nurse.