On-Demand Webinars

  • Invest in Your Health: Stay Cool! Prevention of Heat Related Illness in Agriculture Nov 7

    Contains 6 Component(s) Includes a Live Event on 11/07/2019 at 3:00 PM (CST)

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agriculture is ranked as one of the most dangerous occupations and involves workers and family members of all ages. Illness and injuries can be prevented if we use the right protective equipment for the job. This program will present an overview of common exposures in farming and ranching and identify appropriate personal protective equipment.

  • Invest in Your Health: Hazard Mapping in the Ag Classroom Oct 23

    Contains 6 Component(s) Includes a Live Event on 10/23/2019 at 3:00 PM (CDT)

    This Train the Training course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Participants will learn about the Hazard Mapping curriculum and will be given access to all teacher and student materials after completing the webinar.

  • Agricultural All-Terrain Vehicle Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    All-terrain vehicle (ATV) crashes are one of the leading causes of death and injuries in the agriculture industry in the United States. In this presentation, we will evaluate the current situation and possible solutions related to agricultural ATV safety. Potential injury preventative actions were evaluated based on the hierarchy of control, including elimination or substitution, engineering control, administrative authority, training, and personal protective equipment.

  • Reducing the Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Perinatal Illness for Female Ag. Producers

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges.

  • Hazard Communications Standards

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    This Hazard Communication Standard training program is intended for female workers and managers in the agricultural industry. This includes dairy farms and small farms that hire at-risk populations. The major focus of the program is on the identification of and the safe usage of chemicals and pesticides, along with respiratory protection.

  • Safety Sensitivity of Opioid Use in High Hazardous Industries Such as Agriculture

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine released recommendations for opioid prescribing based on safety-sensitive occupations. Safety-sensitive work is typically classified as operating motor vehicles, modes of transportation, other heavy machinery, or tasks requiring high levels of cognitive function or judgment. Farm duties frequently demand the use of heavy machinery, and concurrent use of narcotics alongside safety-sensitive work can be dangerous. This training educates healthcare providers on how to assess occupational agricultural risks and corresponding patient guidance for those who are taking opioid medications.

  • Exploring the Invest in Your Health Trainer Exchange

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    AgriSafe is committed to training safety and health professionals who wish to teach Invest in Your Health trainings in their classroom. Under our open share platform, once certified, you are free to use the training materials. This webinar discusses what the IYH program is and why this training is so valuable for health professionals.

  • Ergonomic Safety for Farm Women

    Contains 5 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/17/2019

    It is no secret - women are playing an increased role in production agriculture. They account for about one-third of the management, ownership and work on farms, ranches and in crop production. A major challenge continues to be access to protective equipment that meets the ergonomic needs of women. This program is intended to help women in rural/agricultural communities identify ergonomic issues leading to musculoskeletal injuries in farm and ranch work and discover resources to aid in injury prevention.

  • A Research Update from the Agricultural Health Study: Recent Findings, Current Work, and Future Plans

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    It has been over 25 years since participants first enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) cohort; in 1993-97, a total of 89,655 individuals joined the study, including 52,394 private pesticide applicators (mostly farmers) and 32,345 of their spouses from North Carolina and Iowa, and 4,916 commercial applicators from Iowa. The cohort has been followed through 3 surveys (1999-2003, 2005-2010, and 2012-2015) and regular linkages to databases to assess both cancer and non-cancer health outcomes, such as respiratory, autoimmune, endocrine, and neurological diseases. Participants provided detailed data on pesticide use and other agricultural exposures at enrollment and in the first two follow-up surveys, and numerous research papers have investigated potential disease associations. Many participants have also contributed to special studies, including recent projects on Lung Health, Biomarkers of Exposure and Effect, and Memory and Aging. This presentation will highlight a selection of recent findings from the AHS (i.e., in the past 5 years), including a focus on non-cancer outcomes as well as recent cancer and mortality findings, and will describe current and future research priorities.

  • Proactive and Reactive Society: Focus on rural mental health

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/14/2019

    Rural healthcare providers and safety professionals have an important role to play in supporting people experiencing stress or mental health challenges. Come listen as Ted Matthews talks about what we can do to be proactive and prepare ahead of crisis.

  • Assessing Risks in the Misuse of Opioids Among Agricultural Workers – A Guide for Rural Clinicians

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Prescription opioids are often the first-line therapy to treat chronic and acute pain among farmers. Prescribing opioids to farmer populations that may not seek regular treatment or have access to alternative therapies increases the risk for potential opioid misuse. Properly assessing for these characteristics among other abuse or addiction risk factors, is critical in providing treatment that is both appropriate and effective. The training module will seek to provide insight on misuse risk factors among farmers to better inform healthcare providers on warning signs in this specific cohort.

  • Talking to Farmers About Their Pain

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The occupational hazards that farmers face put them at greater risk for acute and chronic pain as a result of ergonomic repetition, accident, or surgical procedure. Addressing specific occupational sources of pain and what activities the pain inhibits are crucial to improving treatment. This module will focus on how to transform the conversation between provider and patient to improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction.

  • Tackling Tough Clinical Conversations

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Many healthcare providers report that addressing behavioral health and substance use issues are one of the most challenging areas of their practice. Providers are unsure how to address these issues and yet they are in a prime position to reduce the negative outcomes related to behavioral health problems. This is especially true in rural areas where agricultural workers are found to have higher rates of suicide, depression, and substance use. This webinar will focus on how healthcare providers can start the conversations necessary to identify and treat behavioral health problems.

  • Integration of Behavioral Health within Agricultural Health Care

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Twenty percent of any population has mental health complications, including farmers and ranchers. Stigma and privacy concerns associated with mental health issues may mean that many people may not seek out available mental health services. This material was produced under grant # (SH – 26280 - SH4) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

  • Establishing a Low-Cost Surveillance System for Agricultural and Logging Injury in the Northeast

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Agriculture and logging are dangerous industries, and though data on fatal injury exists, less is known about non-fatal injury. While past research has informed public health professionals of injury patterns in these industries, a challenge is that these data become dated, and no ongoing systems are able to provide stable estimates of non-fatal injuries over time. NEC researchers established a low-cost, passive surveillance system that has the potential to capture data over a long period.

  • Risk Factors for Agricultural Injury

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    This webinar will explain and examine risk factors for agricultural injury. According to the World Health Organization, a risk factor is any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. The agricultural industry poses many risk factors on an individual's health. Knowledge about risk factor prevention is extremely important in the prevention of injuries and illnesses within the agricultural community.

  • Agritourism: The Next Frontier in Agriculture

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Agritourism can be a great way to add supplemental income to your farm but it does come with an additional set of responsibilities. If you are currently running an agritourism operation or are thinking about making this an addition to your farm, you should become familiar with the Compendium of Measures to Prevent Disease Associated with Animals in Public Settings. Following the guidelines outlined in the Compendium will help you make your farm as safe as possible for visitors and protect your assets.

  • Don't Get Stuck! Preventing Needle Stick Injuries in Agricultural Settings

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Needlestick injuries in agriculture are common although not as recognized as those in human clinical settings. Farmers, ranchers, veterinarians, and on-site workers are susceptible to needlesticks on the job. These injuries can be serious and may require medical attention.

  • New Immigrants in the Midwest and Agricultural Health Implications

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The Midwest is changing rapidly due to globalization, human migration, and new economic patterns. Immigrants and refugees are among the fastest-growing populations in this region of the United States, with a significant number employed in farming, meatpacking, and related agricultural industries. This webinar describes these new demographic patterns, discusses their implications from a public health standpoint, and provides general strategies for professionals working with immigrant and refugee employees in the agricultural jobs.

  • Seconds to Tragedy: Video and Curriculum for Young Worker Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    In grain bins and other grain storage facilities, it is literally just "Seconds to Tragedy". Join us as we introduce a new video, based on a true story, about a double fatality in grain. The video explores missing safety strategies that could have prevented this incident. We will explain how the video, along with a discussion sheet can be used as a training tool, both for high school agricultural teachers and for community training. These video materials compliment the Stand TALL curriculum, which can be used to expand on the concepts and safety strategies introduced in the video. This curriculum consists of three modules that educate and empower young workers with safety strategies for working in agricultural settings.

  • Protecting Young Adults in the Agricultural Workforce

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    In 2014, The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 253,000 young workers between the ages of 16 and 24 worked in agriculture. Young workers who live and work on farms are also exposed to potentially dangerous farm-related hazards. Farm operators who hire youth to work on their farm should be aware of all applicable child labor laws. This material was produced under grant# (SH- 27642-SH5) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

  • Accessing and Using Free Resources for Teaching Fall and Electrical Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Falls and electricity are some of the most common types of hazards encountered in agriculture. This session introduces free materials that can be used to educate others about these hazards. While these materials are ideal for school agricultural classes, the curriculum, including optional interactive activities, also work well for community education. In this "train the trainer" webinar, we will explore the different types of falls experienced on farms and how to protect against them, including fall protection systems. We will then discuss the issues associated with electrical hazards and explore strategies to prevent injuries and fatalities when working around electricity. The session will wrap up with a brief overview of other free instructional materials that can be used in combination with the fall and electrical materials to create a more comprehensive agricultural safety program.

  • Children and Youth: Living, working and playing safely on farms

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Farms and ranches are great places to live, work and play, and there are numerous benefits to growing up on them. However, agricultural worksites are among the most dangerous in the U.S., resulting in numerous injuries and fatalities to youth. For working youth, too many of these injuries and deaths are the result of performing work that does not match their abilities.

  • Youth Working in Agriculture: Keeping Them Safe While They Learn and Grow

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    Work is inherently good for children and youth - and agriculture offers many opportunities for them to develop work skills, learn responsibility and leadership, and gain an appreciation for farming and related industries. We also know that agricultural work can be dangerous, and that many youth are injured or killed while working in agricultural jobs.

  • Children and Tractors: Myths, Facts, or Other

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Join us as we discuss the topic of children and tractors, starting at birth and moving up through adulthood. We will explore what we know, what we think we know, and what we don’t know.

  • Invest in Your Health: Say What? Protecting Your Hearing (Trainer Module)

    Contains 6 Component(s)

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. The young ag producer works in an environment with noise hazards and plays in an environment with noise hazards. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is common (and preventable) but unfortunately, use of hearing protection among youth is not.

  • Invest in Your Health: Stay Cool! Prevention of Heat Related Illness in Agriculture (Trainer Module)

    Contains 6 Component(s)

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agriculture is ranked as one of the most dangerous occupations and involves workers and family members of all ages. Illness and injuries can be prevented if we use the right protective equipment for the job. This program will present an overview of common exposures in farming and ranching and identify appropriate personal protective equipment.

  • Assessment of Opioid Misuse Risk Among Farmers in the Clinical Setting

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Prescription opioids are often the first-line therapy to treat chronic and acute pain among farmers. Prescribing opioids to farmer populations that may not seek regular treatment or have access to alternative therapies increases the risk for potential opioid misuse. Properly assessing for these characteristics among other abuse or addiction risk factors, is critical in providing treatment that is both appropriate and effective. The training module will seek to provide insight on misuse risk factors among farmers to better inform healthcare providers on warning signs in this specific cohort.

  • Engaging Guestworkers in Occupational Safety Research in Forestry

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The southern US contains some of the most intensively managed forests in the world that provide the bulk of the nation's softwood lumber and pulp. There is a paucity of research on the burden of injury, illness, and fatalities among reforestation workers in this region. Latino guest workers make up more than 85% of the reforestation workforce in the region. Efforts to delineate health and safety risk factors associated with tree planters require employer/contractor buy-in and support from crew leaders and industry associations. A participatory approach to research is critical to the success of this study and recruitment efforts must be culturally sensitive to the needs of this work group.

  • Designing, Evaluating and Using Apps and Wearable Technology for Agricultural Workers' Safety and Health

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Mobile and wearable devices and the application software, also known as apps, that run on these devices are becoming ubiquitous in the general population. This is also true in agriculturally related populations. This reality has tremendous potential for improving the health and safety of individuals that work in agriculture. A plethora of apps and devices already exist that can be used for the assessment of workplace hazards and implementation of worker protection. However, very little guidance on the use of these apps for agricultural safety and health exists. This presentation will briefly cover the basics of designing apps and wearable technology, report on a study that developed a framework for evaluating apps and technology that have potential usefulness in this area and present some of the current applications of wearable technology and apps in agricultural safety and health research and outreach.

  • Safety Training on Dairy Farms using Mobile-Learning Technologies

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The delivery of safety training content to workers in agriculture can be a challenging undertaking. This webinar will present a relatively novel approach to the delivery of safety training content to vulnerable workers in the dairy industry.

  • Feedyard Worker Safety- Stakeholder Recommendations for Improvement

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health in collaboration with the Texas Cattle Feeders Association, Moore Ag Safety and the Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America hosted a roundtable discussion designed to gather input regarding worker safety from stakeholders in the feedyard industry. The roundtable included workers, managers, owners, safety professionals, insurance representatives, veterinarians and research personnel. The meeting successfully identified hazards, including emerging issues, highlighted current training efforts, and prioritized needed changes related to worker safety and training at cattle feedyards. This webinar will report the outcomes from this roundtable and subsequent findings.

  • This is Our Brain on Stress

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The downturn in the agricultural economy continues to create stress for farm families, workers, and ag professionals who provide products, services and information in rural communities. This session will present basic information on the stress response and how short-term, acute stress evolves toward longer-term, chronic stress. Brain science research is reviewed, providing a strong basis for necessary and impactful ways to help people "manage" stress, reduce health impacts, and increase abilities to make sound, thoughtful business and family decisions.

  • Respiratory Protection and On-Farm Fit Testing for Agricultural Workers

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    In this webinar, participants will learn about agricultural respiratory hazards and how to select appropriate protection. An overview of medical clearance and fit testing requirements will be given, as well as a discussion of some of the unique challenges faced when providing these services to the agricultural population.

  • Staying Cool in Your Region's Heat: How to manage, identify, and reduce heat illnesses and sun exposure

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    This session will include information on heat exposure, ways to reduce the chances of experiencing heat related illness, sun exposure, safety, and identification of aspects that can be screened as skin cancer. It will also help participants identify if they or someone they are working with is experiencing heat stress, heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

  • Talking to Farmers About Their Pain

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The occupational hazards that farmers face put them at greater risk for acute and chronic pain as a result of ergonomic repetition, accident, or surgical procedure. Addressing specific occupational sources of pain and what activities the pain inhibits are crucial to improving treatment. This module will focus on how to transform the conversation between provider and patient to improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction.

  • Optimizing the Health of the Female Agricultural Producer

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The number of U.S. farms operated by women has increased by nearly 60% over the past three decades, from 5 percent in 1978 to 30 percent in 2012. Farm women face unique environmental exposures, ergonomic challenges, and health disparities. Health and safety initiatives are traditionally targeted to male agricultural producers. Examining the unique health care concerns of the female agriculturist as well as strategies to integrate care for this population is the take home message within this presentation. Funding for this project provided by the Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health, NIOSH AFF Grant U54OH010162.

  • Safe and Healthy Recovery After a Farm Flood

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Disaster recovery can be as dangerous as the disaster itself, especially if no disaster preparedness plan was implemented. This is especially true on farms and ranches where inherent farm hazards such as machinery and equipment, livestock, and agriculture chemicals are displaced and co-mingle, putting all emergency response personnel, farm workers and family members in danger. Floods can heighten the risk of health threats such as mold, tetanus bacteria, contaminated well water, heat illness and high stress. This presentation will highlight basic precautions to prevent possible diseases and injuries during and after flooding.

  • Respiratory Health and Personal Protective Equipment for Ag Producers

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    This presentation will provide participants with training and resources to assist clients in the selection and use of personal protective equipment appropriate for agricultural exposures. Providing adequate protection from the multiple respiratory hazards in production agriculture can be a difficult process. This material was produced under a grant (SH-31230-SH7) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government

  • The Rise of Opioid Use in Rural Communities - Prevalence and Strategies

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    This webinar will describe state and local efforts to promote prevention and access to treatment and analyze national data on the prevalence of opioid in rural and urban settings. We conducted interviews with state-level key informants in four states to understand the challenges and promising practices in monitoring opiate prescribing and diversion, developing prevention interventions, and developing an opioid prevention and treatment infrastructure in rural communities.

  • The Ergonomics of Hand Planting Reforestation Work

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Reforestation work is vital to the health of America's forests and the U.S. economy. Hand planting, a common reforestation practice, provides unique challenges to safety and health practitioners interested in reducing occupational injuries and illnesses. This webinar will share lessons learned from a team of investigators studying occupational exposures to physical risk factors among hand planters in the Southeastern United States.

  • Farmer's Preferences for Hearing Protection Devices: Do Educational Interventions Work?

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Although 44% of Midwestern farmers reported noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) symptoms, less than one-third report using hearing protection devices (HPDs) when working around loud noises. Few studies have evaluated which HPD models farmers prefer to wear, and how educational activities may influence this preference. Dr. Gibbs will be discussing current research on farmer’s priorities and preferences for HPD types, as well as the impact of several hearing conservation education activities.

  • Pharm to Farm: Partnerships to Make Clinical Pharmacy Services Accessible to Missouri Farmers

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    This session will discuss the partnerships and collaborations to deliver clinical pharmacy services to farmers and ranchers, as well as describe how health professions students are trained to become partners in agricultural health and safety.

  • Addressing the Epidemic of ATV Injuries and Deaths: Safety Training Materials and Educational Demonstrations

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    ATVs are used in agriculture as a substitute for pick-up trucks, horses, and just moving about. In 2015, there were 340 deaths and over 97,000 injuries reported involving ATVs that were being used for recreation and work purposes. This webinar will discuss the burden of ATV incidents and provide links to ATV safety training materials that are currently available. Information on ATV safety simulators will be presented. A blueprint will be provided to participants for creating a low-cost, portable, hands-on ATV safety demonstration.

  • Invest in Your Health: Prevention of Zoonotic Diseases (Trainer Module)

    Contains 7 Component(s)

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agricultural producers are at high risk for acquiring a zoonotic disease related to their work environment with minimal information related to risks, symptoms and prevention. The majority of emerging infectious diseases in the U.S. are zoonotic in nature. They are often difficult to determine and many go unreported for a variety of reasons.

  • Invest in Your Health: Cover Up! Head to Toe Personal Protective Equipment (Trainer Module)

    Contains 6 Component(s)

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agriculture is ranked as one of the most dangerous occupations and involves workers and family members of all ages. Illness and injuries can be prevented if we use the right protective equipment for the job. This program will present an overview of common exposures in farming and ranching and identify appropriate personal protective equipment.

  • Invest in Your Health: Hazard Mapping in the Ag Classroom (Trainer Module)

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    This Train the Training course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Participants will learn about the Hazard Mapping curriculum and will be given access to all teacher and student materials after completing the webinar.

  • Prevention of Grain Dust Explosions

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    This Grain Safety program is intended for workers and managers in the grain industry including grain elevators, farm operators and workers, grain haulers, and agriculture business owners. The major focus of the program is on safety in confined space work areas including entry, respiratory protection, and prevention of Grain Dust explosions.

  • Respiratory Protection Program Adapted to Grain Handling Operations

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    The OSHA respiratory standard requires a written respiratory protection program for situations in which permissible exposure levels (PELs) of airborne contaminants could be exceeded or when the employer requires use of respirators by workers. This training will assist agriculture-based employers who require respirator use to comply with the OSHA respiratory protection program standard. Training includes written worksite specific procedures, program evaluation, selection of an appropriate respirator approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), training, fit testing, inspection, cleaning, maintenance, and storage, medical evaluation, work area surveillance and air quality standards. This material was produced under a grant (SH-31230-SH7) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government

  • Confined Space - Grain Bin Entry

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    The Confined Space Grain Safety program is intended for workers and managers in agriculture. This includes Coop's, farm operators, employees, and agriculture business owners. The major focus of the program is on safety in confined space work areas.

  • Reducing the Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Perinatal Illness for Female Agricultural Producers

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges.