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  • Premium Member Webinar
    Contains 3 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 06/27/2024 at 10:45 AM (CDT)

    In this webinar, participants will gain insights into the critical role of sleep and its function in maintaining physical, mental, and emotional health. The presentation will review the impact of sleep disorders, common sleep conditions, and the serious health effects of sleep deprivation, including increased risks for injury and chronic health conditions. Participants will also learn about healthy sleep practices, with a focus on lifestyle factors that enhance sleep quality and practical strategies for improving sleep.

    Summary: In this webinar, participants will gain insights into the critical role of sleep and its function in maintaining physical, mental, and emotional health. The presentation will review the impact of sleep disorders, common sleep conditions, and the serious health effects of sleep deprivation, including increased risks for injury and chronic health conditions. Participants will also learn about healthy sleep practices, focusing on lifestyle factors that enhance sleep quality and practical strategies for improving sleep.

    Intended Audience: This presentation is relevant to everyone, especially those working in rural and agricultural communities. 

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar participants will have a better understanding of:  

    1. The importance of sleep and the critical role sleep plays in maintaining physical, mental, and emotional health.  
    2. Common sleep disorders, their symptoms, and effects on daily functioning  
    3. The impact of sleep disorders  
    4. Health effects of sleep deprivation 
    5. Healthy sleep practices and recommendations to enhance sleep quality  
  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Hazardous materials lurk around many corners of farm shops, buildings, and barns. The health impacts of organic and inorganic exposures can be mild to devastating. Be prepared and be ready to handle identifiable and nonidentifiable materials during everyday farm and ranch work as well as during emergencies. In this training, we will discuss action steps, strategies, and resources to protect individuals working and living on the ranch and farm.

    Summary: Hazardous materials lurk around many corners of farm shops, buildings, and barns. The health impacts of organic and inorganic exposures can be mild to devastating. Be prepared and be ready to handle identifiable and nonidentifiable materials during everyday farm and ranch work as well as during emergencies. In this training, we will discuss action steps, strategies, and resources to protect individuals working and living on the ranch and farm.

    Intended Audience: Agricultural Producers, Agricultural Managers, Farmworkers, Rural EMT and Firefighters

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar participants will be able to:

    1. Identify hazardous material exposures in farm shops, buildings, and barns.
    2. Understand the implications of common agriculture hazardous exposures.
    3. Select the correct PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) to use when working with hazardous materials.

    Linda Emanuel, BSN, RN

    Community Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Shaped by Linda’s experience as a Registered Nurse working in rural communities as well as her proprietorship of a three generational Nebraska family farm, Linda naturally connects as an advocate and educator with agriculture producers and health care professionals.  As the Community Health Director of the AgriSafe Network, she is responsible for curriculum design and outreach for the Veteran Farmer program, Total Farmer Health Coach program, and Women’s health. Her work is promoted on a state, regional and national level through webinars, onsite presentations, publications as well as user-friendly resources. Her passion to support the total farmer health concept drives her to act as a liaison between research and practice.

    Linda has a diverse background in acute care nursing, intensive care, pediatrics, home health care, and  rural primary care clinics. She is an AgriSafe Nurse Scholar, and a Nebraska LEAD fellow. She belongs to the American Nurses Association, Rural Nurses Organization, and Nebraska Nurses Association.  She and her husband own and operate a row crop farming operation that has welcomed back their sons and families to continue a legacy.

  • Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/24/2024

    Forestry workers may be subject to extreme heat and cold. Working outdoors makes people more likely to become dehydrated and experience heat-related illness or heat stress. High temperatures reduce work capacity and may lead to heat stress and dehydration. Although exposure to heat stress is preventable, thousands become sick from occupational heat exposure every year, and some cases are fatal. Similarly, cold weather can reduce dexterity, blood flow, muscle strength, and balance. Hypothermia, frostbite, trench foot, and chilblains are all illnesses and injuries caused by cold stress. However, forestry workers can avoid heat-related illness and cold stress with proper information and preventative action. This presentation will explore both weather-related conditions and their impact on outdoor workers.

    Summary: Forestry workers may be subject to extreme heat and cold. Working outdoors makes people more likely to become dehydrated and experience heat-related illness or heat stress. High temperatures reduce work capacity and may lead to heat stress and dehydration. Although exposure to heat stress is preventable, thousands become sick from occupational heat exposure every year, and some cases are fatal.  Similarly, cold weather can reduce dexterity, blood flow, muscle strength, and balance. Hypothermia, frostbite, trench foot, and chilblains are all illnesses and injuries caused by cold stress. However, forestry workers can avoid heat-related illness and cold stress with proper information and preventative action. This presentation will explore both weather-related conditions and their impact on outdoor workers.

    Intended Audience: This course is intended for workers in forestry and logging, including fallers, first-line supervisors/managers of forestry workers, logging equipment operators, sawing machine setters, operators and tenders, and truck drivers.

    Objectives: After the training, participants will be able to…

    1. Define Heat Stress, Cold Stress, and their related conditions.
    2. Identify vulnerable populations and critical warning signs for interventions.
    3. Share essential resources for Workplace Safety Practices.

    This material was produced under grant #SH-000099-SH3 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health and Equity Director

    AgriSafe Network

    Mrs. Knesha Rose-Davison serves as the Public Health and Equity Director for AgriSafe Network. She has over 17 years of public health experience in maternal and child health, community health, health disparities, and advocacy. In May 2016, she joined AgriSafe Network as their health communications director, quickly growing into their public health programs director, where she managed employer-employee safety training for youth working in agriculture, opioid safety for health providers and agricultural workers, and women’s health topics. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) and a Master of Public Health (2006) from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine focused on rural occupational health, environmental health, and safety. She is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association, where she serves in leadership. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity, and she aligns all her work with these causes.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    It is important for agricultural educators to create inclusive and safe learning environments for all youth. This includes taking intentional steps to make LGBTQ+ youth feel like there is a space for them in the agriculture industry, 4-H, and FFA. But it’s not always easy to know where to start You can take your first step by joining us for “A Conversation on Cultivating LGBTQ+ Safe Spaces for Ag Youth.” This webinar is intended to equip ag educators with practical strategies and insights to foster inclusivity, understanding, and equity in their programs. Implementing this knowledge will enable teachers and leaders to best support all students. This increased support will go on to draw in even more students to join the program! (Increased inclusivity = increased # of members!)

    Summary: It is important for agricultural educators to create inclusive and safe learning environments for all youth. This includes taking intentional steps to make LGBTQ+ youth feel like there is a space for them in the agriculture industry, 4-H, and FFA. But it’s not always easy to know where to start.

    You can take your first step by joining us for “A Conversation on Cultivating LGBTQ+ Safe Spaces for Ag Youth.” This webinar is intended to equip ag educators with practical strategies and insights to foster inclusivity, understanding, and equity in their programs. Implementing this knowledge will enable teachers and leaders to best support all students. This increased support will go on to draw in even more students to join the program! (Increased inclusivity = increased # of members!)

    Why are we talking about LGBTQ+ youth in agriculture?

    • June is Pride Month, a time to celebrate diversity and the LGBTQ+ community.
    • 45% of LGBTQ youth seriously considered attempting suicide in 2022 – but those who felt affirmed and supported at school had lower rates of acting on those thoughts (source: The Trevor Project).
    • Everyone has a place in the agricultural industry and deserves to feel like they belong.
    • By cultivating an inclusive environment and safe spaces for LGBTQ+ youth in ag, we can increase positive health outcomes for that population as well as increase the number of youth who plan to go into the ag industry in the future!

     Intended Audience: Ag educators, teachers, parents, community members

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    1. Have a better understanding of LGBTQ+ youth and their experiences
    2. Feel confident in helping LGBTQ+ youth to feel like they have a space where they belong in agriculture
    3. Be prepared to create LGBTQ+ safe spaces in the ag education classroom
    4. Be able to find and share resources in the local community to support LGBTQ+ youth

    Special thanks to the Cultivating Change Foundation (CCF) for working with AgriSafe to make this webinar a reality! CCF is a nonprofit whose goal is to “value and elevate LGBTQ+ agriculturists through advocacy, education, and community.”

    Luke Allen, BS

    Luke Allen grew up on a grain and livestock farm in central Illinois and was an ag teacher in Clifton, IL before he joined as a Program Advisor for Facilitating Coordination in Agricultural Education (FCAE), where he has been now for 18 years. At FCAE, Luke serves as a resource for school officials, teachers, and others with an interest in agricultural education in Northeast Illinois. Luke is invested in developing Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources (AFNR) programs in urban and suburban areas with special emphasis on inspiring nontraditional and under-served populations to find their passion in AFNR careers. Currently, he is chair of the planning committee of the Cultivating Change Foundation, which works to support LGBTQ+ people in AFNR careers. He has become a national speaker for LGBTQ+ inclusion in agriculture and AFNR education, and this work has led to co-chairing a new Ag Education Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Task Force in Illinois.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    We will review needlestick injuries in animal agriculture. This includes type of injuries and associated costs. This includes a review of veterinary medicines associated with needlesticks and best practices to reduce needlestick injuries in an agricultural context.

    Summary: We will review needlestick injuries in animal agriculture. This includes type of injuries and associated costs. This includes a review of veterinary medicines associated with needlesticks and best practices to reduce needlestick injuries in an agricultural context.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar participants will be able to:

    1. Highlight potential risks associated with needlestick injuries
    2. Be aware of veterinary products that may cause injuries or illness
    3. Provide guidance on proper administration and delivery of veterinary pharmaceuticals
    4. Review appropriate syringe and needle disposal in the agricultural context

    Jeff Bender, DVM, MS DACVPM

    Professor and Director of the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center (UMASH), School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

    Dr. Bender is a professor in both Veterinary Public Health and the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota. He is also a Hospital Epidemiologist with the Veterinary Medical Center at the U of MN and the Co-Director of the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center.

    Dr. Bender's research interests include zoonoses and emerging diseases, food safety, antimicrobial resistance, infectious disease surveillance, and infection prevention and control. 

  • Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/22/2024

    Skid loaders are useful and versatile machines in the hands of appropriate operators. To utilize them to their utmost, we must understand there is inherent risk in the operation of the machine. This class will talk over some of the basics of skid loader operation including why there should be no passengers, proper transport, safety features, and blind spots

    Summary: Skid loaders are useful and versatile machines in the hands of appropriate operators. To utilize them to their utmost, we must understand there is inherent risk in the operation of the machine. This class will talk over some of the basics of skid loader operation including why there should be no passengers, proper transport, safety features, and blind spots.

    Intended Audience: This course is intended for workers in forestry and logging, including fallers, first-line supervisors/managers of forestry workers, logging equipment operators, sawing machine setters, operators and tenders, and truck drivers.

    Objectives: At the conclusion of the training, participants will be able to…

    1. Discuss statistics regarding skid loader accidents (injuries & fatalities)
    2. Recognize the need for operators to understand the manual
    3. Discuss maintenance, upkeep, and repair
    4. Discuss the need for proper securement when transporting
    5. Review various warning labels
    6. Discuss crush and pinch points
    7. Describe proper methods of working on the machine with the boom up
    8. Review various points of operator safety (guarding, safety features, entry and exit)
    9. Discuss why riders should not be allowed and why the machines must have age-appropriate operators
    10. Discuss visibility and blind spots

    This material was produced under grant #SH-000099-SH3 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Premium Member Webinar
    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The webinar will address non-allergic respiratory hazards (dusts, mists, fumes, and gases) affecting agricultural worker, farmers, and farm families living and working in agricultural environments. The focus will be recognizing and preventing environmental and occupational exposures that may result in morbidity and mortality resulting from unprotected or unrecognized respiratory hazards. An overview of the screening of farm workers and farm families that can be provided by health care workers and public health professionals to those working and living in agricultural environments and steps to avoid potentially dangerous exposures and prevent disability or death.

    The webinar will address non-allergic respiratory hazards (dusts, mists, fumes, and gases) affecting agricultural worker, farmers, and farm families living and working in agricultural environments. The focus will be recognizing and preventing environmental and occupational exposures that may result in morbidity and mortality resulting from unprotected or unrecognized respiratory hazards. An overview of the screening of farm workers and farm families that can be provided by health care workers and public health professionals to those working and living in agricultural environments and steps to avoid potentially dangerous exposures and prevent disability or death.

    Learning objectives:

    1. Understand which agricultural respiratory exposures can result in acute and chronic non-allergic respiratory health conditions in those living and working in agricultural environments.
    2. Know which type of respiratory personal protective equipment is appropriate for different agricultural exposures
    3. Understand and be able to provide respiratory exposure medical screening as part of routine rural health care medical history.
    4. Know which agricultural work is not acceptable for children and minors due to hazardous respiratory exposures.

    Steven Kirkhorn, MD, MPH, FACOEM

    Medical Director

    AgriSafe Network

    As AgriSafe Medical Director, Dr. Kirkhorn is responsible for the strategic direction and technical review of the occupational health curriculum, resources, and services. Dr. Kirkhorn serves as the medical leader liaison offering program wide engagement and collaboration, visibility, and opportunity directly contributing to AgriSafe’s success.

    In addition to his role at AgriSafe, Dr Kirkhorn serves as Occupational Medicine Advisor to the NIOSH Upper Midwest Center for Agricultural Safety and Health at the University of Minnesota.

    He received a BS in Zoology and MD at the University of Minnesota and a MPH in Environmental Health at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health.  He served as the Academic Director of the Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety of the HealthPartners Occupational Environmental Medicine Residency.  He is boarded in Occupational Medicine and Family Practice and has been on the adjunct faculty of the University of Minnesota and University of Wisconsin Family Medicine Departments. He has been a practicing Occupational Medicine physician since 1991 and prior to that was a rural Family Practitioner for 10 years in Alaska and Wisconsin. He had completed a year sabbatical and fellowship in Agricultural Medicine in 1997-1998.

    He previously was the Medical Director of the National Farm Medicine Center and Chair of Occupational Health and Chair/ Regional Service Line Director of Occupational Health at Marshfield Clinic in Wisconsin.  He has previously been on the board of AgriSafe and editor for 8 years of the Journal of Agromedicine as well as participating in of multiple agricultural health organizations nationally and in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

    He is the recently retired Director and Section Chief of Occupational Health at the Minneapolis Veterans Administration Health Care System and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Medicine University of Minnesota Medical School.

    His interests include, agricultural and rural occupational and environmental health, curriculum development, as well as birdwatching, biking, and kayaking.  He is also a Master Naturalist through the University of Minnesota Extension.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In the San Luis Valley, Colorado – community leaders have voiced increasing concern for the behavioral health of workers in the agriculture industry. Using Total Worker Health® and Total Farmer Health® frameworks, we developed an interactive worker wellbeing assessment. Approximately 118 participants responded to our survey with a completion rate adequate for analysis. This presentation will describe worker wellbeing through measures of job satisfaction, coworker support, work affect, work fatigue, overall health status, chronic health conditions, individual stress, general mental health status, substance use, work injury, social support, anxiety, and depression.

    Summary: In the San Luis Valley, Colorado – community leaders have voiced increasing concern for the behavioral health of workers in the agriculture industry. Using Total Worker Health® and Total Farmer Health® frameworks, we developed an interactive worker wellbeing assessment. Approximately 118 participants responded to our survey with a completion rate adequate for analysis.

    This presentation will describe worker wellbeing through measures of job satisfaction, coworker support, work affect, work fatigue, overall health status, chronic health conditions, individual stress, general mental health status, substance use, work injury, social support, anxiety, and depression.

    Intended Audience: Ag industry leaders, health providers, behavioral health clinicians

    Objectives: After the training, participants will be able to…

    1. Identify sources of stress for agriculture workers in the San Luis Valley, Colorado
    2. Recognize varying levels of behavioral health risk factors, behaviors, and outcomes
    3. Evaluate behavioral health through a work-centric lens

    Katherine A. James, PhD, MSPH, MS

    Associate Professor, University of Colorado – Anschutz Medical Campus

    Dr. James is an epidemiologist specializing in climate change and human health in the San Luis Valley, CO, and other areas of the Mountain West. While most of her work focuses on environmental health systems, her experience facilitating community-engaged research positions her well to lead research across several intersecting fields.

  • Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/13/2023

    Forest workers face unique ergonomic challenges due to their exposure to extreme environmental conditions, heavy workload, and dangerous tools and machines. The forest sector has one of the highest rates of Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs), almost 100 times higher than the industrial targets the National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) set. This program is intended to help forest workers identify ergonomic issues leading to musculoskeletal injuries and discover resources to aid in injury treatment and prevention.

    Summary: Forest workers face unique ergonomic challenges due to their exposure to extreme environmental conditions, heavy workload, and dangerous tools and machines. The forest sector has one of the highest rates of Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs), almost 100 times higher than the industrial targets the National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) set. This program is intended to help forest workers identify ergonomic issues leading to musculoskeletal injuries and discover resources to aid in injury treatment and prevention.

    Objectives: At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to…

    1. Identify work site hazards and potential resulting musculoskeletal injuries.

    2. Identify three initiatives aimed at reducing risks related to musculoskeletal injuries.

    3. Locate evidence-based resources in the forestry health and safety field that address ergonomic security.

    Intended Audience: This course is intended for workers in forestry and logging, including fallers, first-line supervisors/managers of forestry workers, logging equipment operators, sawing machine setters, operators and tenders, and truck drivers.

    Abigail Kahrs, MPH

    Program Coordinator

    AgriSafe Network

    Abigail Kahrs is the Program Coordinator for AgriSafe. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Animal Science as well as a Master’s in Public Health. She organizes, and coordinates educational opportunities and resources for farmers, farm labor contractors, farm workers, and their families on issues associated with health and work safety (pesticide safety, weather protection, and other occupational hazards) as well as overall agricultural worker family well-being. She primarily assists in the scheduling, training, and reporting of women’s health, infectious diseases, and youth safety programs at AgriSafe Network.

  • Contains 7 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In the wake of the global impact of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the ensuing coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), the urgency to safeguard agricultural employees from infectious diseases has become paramount. Acknowledging the rapid and profound effects of the pandemic on a global scale, particularly its impact on individuals engaged in essential agricultural work, there is a heightened need to implement robust measures to mitigate the heightened risk of adverse health and economic consequences among this workforce. Addressing the challenges posed by the post-COVID era, it is imperative to adapt and enhance workplace safety protocols to ensure the well-being of agricultural workers, recognizing their critical role in sustaining essential food production. This presentation aims to emphasize proactive measures that employers can implement to minimize the transmission of infectious diseases. Key focus areas will encompass education and training, the proper utilization of personal protective equipment, adherence to rigorous hygiene practices, effective sanitation and disinfection protocols, robust communication and outreach strategies, well-prepared emergency response plans, and the incorporation of cultural sensitivity considerations. Employers can create safer and healthier work environments by addressing these comprehensive elements.

    Summary: In the wake of the global impact of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the ensuing coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), the urgency to safeguard agricultural employees from infectious diseases has become paramount. Acknowledging the rapid and profound effects of the pandemic on a global scale, particularly its impact on individuals engaged in essential agricultural work, there is a heightened need to implement robust measures to mitigate the heightened risk of adverse health and economic consequences among this workforce. Addressing the challenges posed by the post-COVID era, it is imperative to adapt and enhance workplace safety protocols to ensure the well-being of agricultural workers, recognizing their critical role in sustaining essential food production.

    This presentation aims to emphasize proactive measures that employers can implement to minimize the transmission of infectious diseases. Key focus areas will encompass education and training, the proper utilization of personal protective equipment, adherence to rigorous hygiene practices, effective sanitation and disinfection protocols, robust communication and outreach strategies, well-prepared emergency response plans, and the incorporation of cultural sensitivity considerations. Employers can create safer and healthier work environments by addressing these comprehensive elements.

    Intended Audience: Farm/Ranch owners and operators, health and safety professionals, and anyone who serves as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: After the program, participants will be able to…

    1. Develop a comprehensive understanding of infectious disease control measures to mitigate exposure risks for agricultural workers and employers.
    2. Formulate an infectious disease assessment and control plan by incorporating guidelines provided by the CDC.
    3. Demonstrate awareness of the effectiveness of vaccines in preventing infectious diseases within the agricultural workplace.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-000099-SH3 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Steven Kirkhorn, MD, MPH, FACOEM

    Medical Director

    AgriSafe Network

    As AgriSafe Medical Director, Dr. Kirkhorn is responsible for the strategic direction and technical review of the occupational health curriculum, resources, and services. Dr. Kirkhorn serves as the medical leader liaison offering program wide engagement and collaboration, visibility, and opportunity directly contributing to AgriSafe’s success.

    In addition to his role at AgriSafe, Dr Kirkhorn serves as Occupational Medicine Advisor to the NIOSH Upper Midwest Center for Agricultural Safety and Health at the University of Minnesota.

    He received a BS in Zoology and MD at the University of Minnesota and a MPH in Environmental Health at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health.  He served as the Academic Director of the Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety of the HealthPartners Occupational Environmental Medicine Residency.  He is boarded in Occupational Medicine and Family Practice and has been on the adjunct faculty of the University of Minnesota and University of Wisconsin Family Medicine Departments. He has been a practicing Occupational Medicine physician since 1991 and prior to that was a rural Family Practitioner for 10 years in Alaska and Wisconsin. He had completed a year sabbatical and fellowship in Agricultural Medicine in 1997-1998.

    He previously was the Medical Director of the National Farm Medicine Center and Chair of Occupational Health and Chair/ Regional Service Line Director of Occupational Health at Marshfield Clinic in Wisconsin.  He has previously been on the board of AgriSafe and editor for 8 years of the Journal of Agromedicine as well as participating in of multiple agricultural health organizations nationally and in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

    He is the recently retired Director and Section Chief of Occupational Health at the Minneapolis Veterans Administration Health Care System and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Medicine University of Minnesota Medical School.

    His interests include, agricultural and rural occupational and environmental health, curriculum development, as well as birdwatching, biking, and kayaking.  He is also a Master Naturalist through the University of Minnesota Extension.