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  • Invest in Your Health: Cover Up! Head to Toe Personal Protective Equipment (LIVE January 15)

    Contains 6 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 01/15/2020 at 3:00 PM (CST)

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agriculture is ranked as one of the most dangerous occupations and involves workers and family members of all ages. Illness and injuries can be prevented if we use the right protective equipment for the job. This program will present an overview of common exposures in farming and ranching and identify appropriate personal protective equipment.

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agriculture is ranked as one of the most dangerous occupations and involves workers and family members of all ages. Illness and injuries can be prevented if we use the right protective equipment for the job. This program will present an overview of common exposures in farming and ranching and identify appropriate personal protective equipment.
    At the conclusion of the program, participants/educators will be able to: 
    1. Review several of the indicators related to use of personal protective equipment (PPE) in agriculture 
    2. Access personal protective (PPE) educational material developed for classroom use
    3. Select decision making activities from programs designed for classroom time frames
    4. Identify safety and health resources for use in educational settings
    Other available Train the Trainer modules include:
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    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Invest in Your Health: Prevention of Zoonotic Diseases (LIVE Jan. 14))

    Contains 7 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 01/14/2020 at 3:00 PM (CST)

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agricultural producers are at high risk for acquiring a zoonotic disease related to their work environment with minimal information related to risks, symptoms and prevention. The majority of emerging infectious diseases in the U.S. are zoonotic in nature. They are often difficult to determine and many go unreported for a variety of reasons.

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agricultural producers are at high risk for acquiring a zoonotic disease related to their work environment with minimal information related to risks, symptoms and prevention. The majority of emerging infectious diseases in the U.S. are zoonotic in nature. They are often difficult to determine and many go unreported for a variety of reasons.
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1. Define zoonotic disease and identify various modes of transmission; 
    2. Locate recommended educational resources for use in educational programs; 
    3. Discuss warning signs and symptoms of major zoonotic diseases; 
    4. Identify zoonotic diseases affecting the production agricultural population
    Other Available Train the Trainer modules include:
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    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett has her BS in Molecular Biology from Defiance College, MS in Environmental Toxicology from Texas Tech University, and is currently a DVM candidate at Michigan State University. Her passion for public health began during a water testing project in Tanzania, Africa and has continued to evolve and include research focused on wildlife diseases and vector-borne zoonoses. Katelyn also served as a member of the AgriSafe Young Advisors Council, from 2016-2017. In her role as a rural leader, she assisted AgriSafe in design and launching of educational initiatives that can reduce farm related illness, injury and fatalities.

  • Invest in Your Health: Say What? Protecting Your Hearing (LIVE January 9)

    Contains 8 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 01/09/2020 at 2:00 PM (CST)

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. The young ag producer works in an environment with noise hazards and plays in an environment with noise hazards. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is common (and preventable) but unfortunately, use of hearing protection among youth is not.

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. The young ag producer works in an environment with noise hazards and plays in an environment with noise hazards. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is common (and preventable) but unfortunately, use of hearing protection among youth is not. 

    By the end of the Train the Trainer session, participants/educators will be able to: 
    - Understand the pathophysiology of hearing loss 
    - Recognize the importance of preventing noise induced hearing loss 
    - Use the Invest in Your Health training materials and classroom activities to teach hearing loss prevention

    Other available Train the Trainer Modules include:

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    Marjorie McCullagh, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC, COHN-S, FAAOHN, FAAN

    Professor and Occupational Health Nursing Program Director, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    Dr. McCullagh's career has focused on occupational health and safety, particularly as it relates to use of personal protection devices among farm operators and their families. Since 1985 she has had an active program of research in mitigating hazardous occupational exposures. She has conducted several randomized clinical trials, comparing the effectiveness of several approaches to influencing use of personal protective equipment. Dr. McCullagh is an associate professor and Director of the Occupational Health Nursing program at the University of Michigan School of Nursing.

  • Helping Farmers Weather the Storm of Emotions + Economics: NY Farmnet (LIVE December 16)

    Contains 3 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 12/16/2019 at 12:00 PM (CST)

    NY FarmNet, a Cornell University program, helps farmers in New York state navigate the waters of growth, change, and crisis. Since 1986, NY FarmNet has provided free, confidential on farm consulting to thousands of farmers and their families. With its unique, holistic approach - offering both financial and family/personal guidance - the program is able to help farm families work through a multitude of challenges that may be affecting the farm business. This webinar will discuss the impact of NY FarmNet's work, as well as some best practices for working with and engaging farmers. Learning Objectives: 1. Gain insight on providing direct counseling services to farmers. 2. Recognize the benefits of addressing both the financial and emotional sides of farm businesses. 3. Identify existing networks to support farmers and farm families.

    NY FarmNet, a Cornell University program, helps farmers in New York state navigate the waters of growth, change, and crisis. Since 1986, NY FarmNet has provided free, confidential on farm consulting to thousands of farmers and their families. With its unique, holistic approach - offering both financial and family/personal guidance - the program is able to help farm families work through a multitude of challenges that may be affecting the farm business. This webinar will discuss the impact of NY FarmNet's work, as well as some best practices for working with and engaging farmers.
    Learning Objectives:
    1. Gain insight on providing direct counseling services to farmers.
    2. Recognize the benefits of addressing both the financial and emotional sides of farm businesses.
    3. Identify existing networks to support farmers and farm families. 


    Funded through the generous support of:

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    Federal Office of Rural Health Policy

    Brenda O'Brien

    Family Consultant, NY FarmNet

    Brenda O'Brien was born and raised on a large dairy farm in Central New York. She worked side by side with her father and learned about the farm finances. While she was earning a Bachelor's in Economics and Management Science from the State University of New York at Cortland, she began managing the farm finances, human resources, and herd management aspects of the farm business. She later moved to Northern Virginia where she worked for the United States Department of Agriculture and then for the Maryland & Virginia Milk Cooperative. Brenda continued her education, earning her Master's degree in Counseling, which has proven to be invaluable with her work for more than 20 years in her church community and adult education. She is a trained facilitator in both Youth and Adult Mental Health First Aid. With her lifelong experience in agriculture, working on the family farm, and caring for her five children, Brenda brings a unique and valuable perspective to NY FarmNet.

    Kate Downes

    Outreach Director, NY FarmNet

    Kate Downes is the Outreach Director for NY FarmNet, a program based at Cornell University that provides free, confidential, on-farm guidance to any farmer in New York State. NY FarmNet works with farmers and their families in a holistic way to achieve both business and personal goals. In her role, she has become a leader on rural and farmer mental health. She works cooperatively to provide resources and support systems within New York agriculture by telling the story of rural New Yorkers and sharing their unique culture. Kate's work is shaped by a passion for community and an agricultural connection spanning back to her childhood. She earned her Bachelor’s in Agricultural Business at the State University of New York, College of Agriculture and Technology at Cobleskill. Through a series of left turns into journalism and public relations, Kate returned to university to earn her Master of Science degree in Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development at University College Dublin, Ireland. She has been trained in both Adult and Youth Mental Health First Aid, as well as Michigan State University Extension’s Communicating with Farmers Under Stress and Weathering the Storm in Agriculture: How Farmers Can Cultivate a Productive Mindset. She is a LEAD NY Class 18 Fellow, and serves on the advisory board of NY Agriculture in the Classroom. Featured in the New York Times, Successful Farming, The Rural Monitor, Spectrum News, and many others, Kate shares her experiences in hopes of breaking down the behavioral health stigma and helping the agricultural community to thrive. She is the mother of two and the wife of one - and she balances it all by getting outdoors, crafting, adventuring, and trying to figure out what just came in her CSA box.

  • Ag Specific Respiratory Exposures and Prevention for Women Working in Agriculture (LIVE December 11)

    Contains 3 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 12/11/2019 at 12:00 PM (CST)

    Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge. Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education

    Summary:  Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge.  Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education
    Intended audience: The primary audience for this program will be rural health care providers, educators, and agribusiness safety managers
    Objectives (Focus areas): At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to: 
    1. List at least three sources of common agricultural respiratory hazards 
    2. Identify appropriate respiratory protection equipment for women working in agriculture 
    3. Access a minimum of three evidence- based resources for use in respiratory health and safety education for women working in agricultural environments.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Eliminating Workplace Violence in the Field for Employers

    Contains 3 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 12/09/2019 at 12:00 PM (CST)

    Thirty-six percent of the 3.4 million producers counted in the census are women. Education will focus on all women including farmworker women and their employers on reporting violent incidents to authorities, making employees aware of their legal rights, safe work practices, medical referrals, treatment, and options including counseling if needed. Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Thirty-six percent of the 3.4 million producers counted in the census are women. Education will focus on all women including farmworker women and their employers on reporting violent incidents to authorities, making employees aware of their legal rights, safe work practices, medical referrals, treatment, and options including counseling if needed.
    Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators,  health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting. 
    Objectives Upon completion of this webinar, participants will understand the following concepts:
    1. The scope and nature of workplace violence occurring in agriculture today.
    2. Employers' responsibilities in addressing workplace violence and implementing preventive measures.
    3. Effective strategies and interventions that can make the workplace safer and more responsive to employee-victims.


    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association’s and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Hazard Communications Standards (LIVE December 3)

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    This Hazard Communication Standard training program is intended for female workers and managers in the agricultural industry. This includes dairy farms and small farms that hire at-risk populations. The major focus of the program is on the identification of and the safe usage of chemicals and pesticides, along with respiratory protection.

    This Hazard Communication Standard training program is intended for female workers and managers in the agricultural industry. This includes dairy farms and small farms that hire at-risk populations. The major focus of the program is on the identification of and the safe usage of chemicals and pesticides, along with respiratory protection.
    At the conclusion of the training, participants will be able to: 
    1. Describe the purpose of OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HCS)
    2. Explain the basic requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard
    3. Differentiate between physical and health hazards of agricultural chemicals
    4. Recall the requirements of a written hazard communication program
    5. List the components of a hazard communication training program
    6. Interpret the information contained in Safety Data Sheets (SDS)
    7. Describe the requirements and purpose of hazard warning labels.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Reducing the Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Perinatal Illness for Female Ag. Producers - November 25

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges.

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges. 
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify unique exposures/risks associated with farm tasks.
    2. Identify at least four reproductive health and safety issues for women. 
    3. Locate three current evidenced based resources in the field of agricultural health 
    4. Develop Hazard Map of work exposures.
    5. Select appropriate PPE for farm tasks to reduce or eliminate exposures and or risks.
    Intended Audience:
    Supervisor or Managers: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators,  health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.
     Producers: This training is intended primarily for agricultural producers including but not limited to farmers, ranchers, and any person or persons involved in some combination of raising field crops, orchards, vineyards, horticulture, or other livestock.
    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association’s and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Ergonomic Safety for Farm Women (November 19)

    Contains 6 Component(s)

    It is no secret - women are playing an increased role in production agriculture. They account for about one-third of the management, ownership and work on farms, ranches and in crop production. A major challenge continues to be access to protective equipment that meets the ergonomic needs of women. This program is intended to help women in rural/agricultural communities identify ergonomic issues leading to musculoskeletal injuries in farm and ranch work and discover resources to aid in injury prevention.

    It is no secret - women are playing an increased role in production agriculture. They account for about one-third of the management, ownership and work on farms, ranches and in crop production. A major challenge continues to be access to protective equipment that meets the ergonomic needs of women. This program is intended to help women in rural/agricultural communities identify ergonomic issues leading to musculoskeletal injuries in farm and ranch work and discover resources to aid in injury prevention.
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify work site hazards and potential musculoskeletal injuries.
    2. Identify wellness initiatives aimed at reducing risks related to musculoskeletal injuries.
    3. Locate three current evidenced based resources in the field of agricultural health and safety that address ergonomic safety.
    4. Utilize the individual AgHRA to look at current exposures and preventive methods for daily farm tasks. 
    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Invest in Your Health: Stay Cool! Prevention of Heat Related Illness in Agriculture (LIVE November 7)

    Contains 7 Component(s)

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agriculture is ranked as one of the most dangerous occupations and involves workers and family members of all ages. Illness and injuries can be prevented if we use the right protective equipment for the job. This program will present an overview of common exposures in farming and ranching and identify appropriate personal protective equipment.

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agriculture is ranked as one of the most dangerous occupations and involves workers and family members of all ages. Illness and injuries can be prevented if we use the right protective equipment for the job. This program will present an overview of common exposures in farming and ranching and identify appropriate personal protective equipment.
    At the conclusion of the program, participants/educators will be able to: 
    1. Review several indicators related to various types of heat related illnesses
    2. Identify educational activities which allow students to recognize warning signs, and immediate care procedures developed for classroom use
    3. Find safety and health resources for use in educational settings
    Other available Train the Trainer modules include:
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    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association’s and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.