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  • Tackling Tough Clinical Conversations

    Contains 3 Component(s) Includes a Live Event on 07/09/2019 at 12:00 PM (CDT)

    Many healthcare providers report that addressing behavioral health and substance use issues are one of the most challenging areas of their practice. Providers are unsure how to address these issues and yet they are in a prime position to reduce the negative outcomes related to behavioral health problems. This is especially true in rural areas where agricultural workers are found to have higher rates of suicide, depression, and substance use. This webinar will focus on how healthcare providers can start the conversations necessary to identify and treat behavioral health problems.

    Many healthcare providers report that addressing behavioral health and substance use issues are of the most challenging areas of their practice.  Providers are unsure how to address these issues and yet they are in a prime position to reduce the negative outcomes related behavioral health problems.  This is especially true in rural areas where agricultural workers are found to have higher rates of suicide, depression, and substance use.  This webinar will focus on how healthcare providers can start the conversations necessary to identify and treat behavioral health problems. 

    Objectives:

    1. Participants will be able to identify the barriers to having productive clinical conversations regarding behavioral health. 
    2. Participants will be able to describe the Five Principles of Motivational Interviewing.
    3. Participants will apply motivational interviewing principles to a clinical case.

    Christine Chasek, LIMHP, LADC, LPC

    Associate Professor, Department of Counseling and School Psychology, Director of BHECN , University of Nebraska at Kearney

    Christine Chasek is an Associate Professor at the University of Nebraska Kearney and Director of the Behavioral Healthcare Center of Nebraska-Kearney.  She has strong rural roots and teaches many behavioral health classes in a Midwestern rural University.  Dr. Chasek has more than 20 years of experience practicing mental health and drug and alcohol counseling as a Licensed Independent Mental Health Practitioner and a Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor in rural areas.  Dr. Chasek also serves on the Nebraska Alcohol and Drug Licensing Board and is President of the International Association of Addiction and Offender Counselors.    

  • Nurse Scholar Program - All Online

    Contains 21 Component(s)

    The AgriSafe Nurse Scholar program is a distance learning opportunity available to rural nurses. The program, provided by experienced health & safety educators will enable rural nurses to increase their knowledge base in prevention, identification and assessment of diseases related to agricultural work exposures. Nurses who complete this program will be eligible for 18 hours of continuing nursing education.

    Farmers and ranchers are part of medically underserved populations with health disparities that correlate with occupational exposures. The sense of urgency to train nurses across the nation has become intense, as they are the front-line resource to disseminate information along with preventing illnesses found in this unique population.

    ****Attention Nurses****
    If you are a nurse and work in a rural health clinic or for a non-profit organization, you may be eligible for a 50% reduction in course fee. Please email your name, employer's name, work phone number, job title, and the website address of your employer to Ansley at astpierre@agrisafe.org. Ansley will email you a discount code to use at registration. Please allow 72 hours for a reply.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Nurse Scholar Program Coordinator and Lead Instructor, Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Ann Carruth, RN, MSN, DNS

    Dean, College of Nursing and Health Sciences and Professor of Nursing Southeastern Louisiana University

    Rupali Das, MD, MPH, FACOEM

    Senior Vice President, California Medical Director, Zenith Insurance Company, and Associate Clinical Professor, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of California San Francisco

    Kelley J. Donham, MS, DVM, DACVPM

    Consultant in Agricultural Medicine and the Rural Health Clinic of Eastern Iowa

    Sarah Hunt, MSN, APRN, FNP-BC

    Regis University and Sanford Center for Digestive Health

    Barbara C. Lee, RN, MSN, PhD

    Director and Senior Research Scientist, National Farm Medicine Center, Marshfield Clinic Health Systems, and Director, National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

    Linda A. McCauley, RN, PhD, FAAN, FAAOHN

    Dean and Professor, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University

    Marjorie McCullagh, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC, COHN-S, FAAOHN, FAAN

    Professor and Occupational Health Nursing Program Director, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    Athena Ramos, PhD, MBA, MS, CPM

    Community Health Program Manager/Instructor, Center for Reducing Health Disparities/Department of Health Promotion, Social, and Behavioral Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center

    Deborah B. Reed, MSPH, PhD, RN, FAAOHN, FAAN

    Distinguished Service Professor and Good Samaritan Endowed Chair College of Nursing University of Kentucky

  • Invest In Your Health - Train the Trainer Course

    Contains 21 Component(s)

    AgriSafe is offering this Train-the-Trainer series to anyone who works with youth (ages 14-23 years). The series of modules will walk you through 5 target areas and includes an instructor guide after completing each topic.

    AgriSafe is offering this Train-the-Trainer series to anyone who works with youth (ages 14-23 years). The series of modules will walk you through 5 target areas and includes an instructor guide after completing each topic. These train the trainer courses will help prepare you to teach on each of the topic areas included. You will have the opportunity to increase your knowledge and will receive an instructor guide to use with your students or young workers. The modules include On-Demand webinars, Classroom Learning Activities, as well as an Instructor Guidebook.
    Train the Trainer Course Topics Include:
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    Once all five modules are completed the instructor will earn an Invest in Your Health Instructor Scholar certificate. Using AgriSafe's online Learning Lab, instructors have the capability to use the provided materials in a classroom setting to educate students. Upon request, students are also eligible to receive an Invest in Your Health Student Scholar certificate of completion once they complete the assigned modules under the guidance of the instructor. Under our open share platform, once certified, you would be free to use the training materials in your classroom setting. Our end goal is to build the capacity of local Ag educators, rural health professionals and rural leaders to train young Ag producers.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

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    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association’s and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

    Natalie Roy, MPH

    AgriSafe Executive Director

    As Executive Director of AgriSafe for over sixteen years, Natalie Roy utilizes her public health training to improve the quality of health care offered to farm families. Natalie holds a Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She is pleased to work in the area of agricultural health as it relates to her experience growing up on a farm in Canterbury New Hampshire.

    Marjorie McCullagh, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC, COHN-S, FAAOHN, FAAN

    Professor and Occupational Health Nursing Program Director, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    Dr. McCullagh's career has focused on occupational health and safety, particularly as it relates to use of personal protection devices among farm operators and their families. Since 1985 she has had an active program of research in mitigating hazardous occupational exposures. She has conducted several randomized clinical trials, comparing the effectiveness of several approaches to influencing use of personal protective equipment. Dr. McCullagh is an associate professor and Director of the Occupational Health Nursing program at the University of Michigan School of Nursing.

    Linda Emanuel, RN

    Community Health Nurse, AgriSafe Network

    Good health advocacy has been at the heart of Linda’s essence from her formative years as a farm girl in eastern Nebraska. Graduating from Nebraska Methodist School of Nursing in 1985, she worked as an R.N. in a variety of acute care hospital settings for over 30 years. She and her husband Tom raised three sons on a successful row crop operation that has been able to welcome the next generation and their families home to continue to diversify their family business. Linda served as a Fellow in the Nebraska LEAD program and has also received agrimedicine training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Linda now serves on the advisory board for CS-CASH and a member of the AgriSafe team, as a Community Health Nurse.

    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett has her BS in Molecular Biology from Defiance College, MS in Environmental Toxicology from Texas Tech University, and is currently a DVM candidate at Michigan State University. Her passion for public health began during a water testing project in Tanzania, Africa and has continued to evolve and include research focused on wildlife diseases and vector-borne zoonoses. Katelyn also served as a member of the AgriSafe Young Advisors Council, from 2016-2017. In her role as a rural leader, she assisted AgriSafe in design and launching of educational initiatives that can reduce farm related illness, injury and fatalities.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Hazard Communications Standards

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    This Hazard Communication Standard training program is intended for female workers and managers in the agricultural industry. This includes dairy farms and small farms that hire at-risk populations. The major focus of the program is on the identification of and the safe usage of chemicals and pesticides, along with respiratory protection.

    At the conclusion of the training, participants will be able to: 
    1. Describe the purpose of OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HCS)
    2. Explain the basic requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard
    3. Differentiate between physical and health hazards of agricultural chemicals
    4. Recall the requirements of a written hazard communication program
    5. List the components of a hazard communication training program
    6. Interpret the information contained in Safety Data Sheets (SDS)
    7. Describe the requirements and purpose of hazard warning labels.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Integration of Behavioral Health within Agricultural Health Care

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Twenty percent of any population has mental health complications, including farmers and ranchers. Stigma and privacy concerns associated with mental health issues may mean that many people may not seek out available mental health services.

    At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify a minimum of three common stressors prevalent among agricultural producers  
    2. Describe at least four signs and symptoms of depression and anxiety  
    3. Describe population based and individual based behavioral health interventions  
    4. Locate professionals and current resources in the field of agricultural behavioral health

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Establishing a Low-Cost Surveillance System for Agricultural and Logging Injury in the Northeast

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Agriculture and logging are dangerous industries, and though data on fatal injury exists, less is known about non-fatal injury. While past research has informed public health professionals of injury patterns in these industries, a challenge is that these data become dated, and no ongoing systems are able to provide stable estimates of non-fatal injuries over time. NEC researchers established a low-cost, passive surveillance system that has the potential to capture data over a long period.

    Upon completion of this program, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify the challenges surrounding injury surveillance in the agriculture and forestry sectors.
    2. Explain the benefits and limitations of using administrative data for injury surveillance.
    3. Describe the most frequent causes of agricultural and logging injury in the Northeast.

    Erika Scott, MS, PhD

    Junior Research Investigator, Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing ​​

    Erika Scott is a researcher with the Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing where she specializes in injury surveillance. Other interests include agricultural and logging safety, health promotion in rural populations, and industrial hygiene. She holds a master's degree in environmental and occupational health with a focus in industrial hygiene from the University of Albany School of Public Health. 

  • Risk Factors for Agricultural Injury

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    This webinar will explain and examine risk factors for agricultural injury. According to the World Health Organization, a risk factor is any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. The agricultural industry poses many risk factors on an individual's health. Knowledge about risk factor prevention is extremely important in the prevention of injuries and illnesses within the agricultural community.

    At the close of the session, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify a 'risk factor'
    2. Understand how risk factors are identified in research studies
    3. Differentiate between modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors
    4. Describe risk factors for agricultural injury
    5. Use knowledge of risk factors for prevention 

    Risto Rautiainen, MS, PhD

    Director, Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health (CS-CASH) Department of Environmental, Agricultural & Occupational Health, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center

    Dr. Rautiainen's educational background includes an MS in agriculture and PhD in Occupational and Environmental Health. He previously served as Safety Agronomist and Head of the Occupational Safety Department of the Finnish Farmers' Social Insurance Institution. He later joined The University of Iowa, Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health (GPCAH) as Center Coordinator, Associate Director for Outreach and as Deputy Director. Since 2009, he has worked at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He currently directs the Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health (CS-CASH) and chairs the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) Surveillance working group for Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing. His research interests include injury surveillance, prevention, education, outreach, and evaluation. 

  • Agritourism: The Next Frontier in Agriculture

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Agritourism can be a great way to add supplemental income to your farm but it does come with an additional set of responsibilities. If you are currently running an agritourism operation or are thinking about making this an addition to your farm, you should become familiar with the Compendium of Measures to Prevent Disease Associated with Animals in Public Settings. Following the guidelines outlined in the Compendium will help you make your farm as safe as possible for visitors and protect your assets.

    At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:
    1. Understand what zoonotic diseases are, how they are transmitted, and why they are a potential problem for your farm
    2. Be aware of the national best practices outlined in the Compendium and available resources to help you follow these guidelines
    3. Apply these best practices to your farm in order to reduce the risk of illness or injury to visitors
    4. Understand that the risk will never be zero

    Carrie Klumb, MPH

    Epidemiologist, Minnesota Department of Health

    Carrie is an epidemiologist in the Zoonotic Diseases Unit at the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) and is the project coordinator for MDH's project associated with the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center (UMASH) at the University of Minnesota. This project focuses on surveillance of zoonotic diseases in agricultural workers, their families, and others exposed to agricultural settings. She also plans annual Healthy Fairs Workshops and Agritourism Workshops for those involved in county fairs and agritourism. She received her MPH from the University of Minnesota in Environmental Health.

  • Don't Get Stuck! Preventing Needle Stick Injuries in Agricultural Settings

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Needlestick injuries in agriculture are common although not as recognized as those in human clinical settings. Farmers, ranchers, veterinarians, and on-site workers are susceptible to needlesticks on the job. These injuries can be serious and may require medical attention.

    At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:
    1. Be aware of the type of products that livestock producers and veterinarians are exposed to.
    2. Recognize the epidemiologic features associated with needlestick related injuries
    3. Use and apply preventive practices to reduce needlestick related injuries.

    Jeff Bender, DVM, MS DACVPM

    Dr. Bender is a professor in both Veterinary Public Health and the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota. He is also a Hospital Epidemiologist with the Veterinary Medical Center at the U of MN and the Co-Director of the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center.

    Dr. Bender's research interests include zoonoses and emerging diseases, food safety, antimicrobial resistance, infectious disease surveillance, and infection prevention and control. 

  • New Immigrants in the Midwest and Agricultural Health Implications

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The Midwest is changing rapidly due to globalization, human migration, and new economic patterns. Immigrants and refugees are among the fastest growing populations in this region of the United States, with a significant number employed in farming, meatpacking, and related agricultural industries. This webinar describes these new demographic patterns, discusses their implications from a public health standpoint, and provides general strategies for professionals working with immigrant and refugee employees in the agricultural jobs.

    Objectives:
    1. To understand the changing demographics of the Midwest; 
    2. To analyze the implications of these demographic changes for the health of agricultural workers; and
    3. To gain strategies for working effectively in the public health field with immigrant and refugee agricultural workers 

    Michele Devlin, DrPH

    Division Chair & Professor, Health Promotion and Education & Director, Iowa Center on Health Disparities - University of Northern Iowa

    Dr. Michele Devlin is Professor of Global Public Health and Chair of the Division of Health Promotion and Education at the University of Northern Iowa. She also founded the Iowa Center on Health Disparities, a model organization established by the National Institutes of Health to improve health equity for underserved populations, and is Director of the UNI Global Health Corps humanitarian relief organization.  Dr. Devlin is also Adjunct Research Professor with the United States Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.  She completed her doctorate degree in international public health at the University of California at Los Angeles.  Her primary areas of specialty include human migration, maternal and child health, and disaster response with refugee and minority populations. 

    Mark Grey, PhD

    Professor of Anthropology and Director, The Iowa Center for Immigrant Leadership and Integration - University of Northern Iowa

    Mark Grey is associate professor if anthropology at the University of Northern Iowa. He received his PhD in applied anthropology at the University of Colorado -Boulder. His current research interests include rural communities, economic development and ethnic relations in rapidly changing rural towns in the American Midwest. He also has extensive experience conducting research in rural schools.