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  • Respiratory Fit Testing in Agricultural Communities (June 24, 2020)

    Contains 8 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/24/2020

    Respiratory PPE fit testing helps assure the best protection against dangerous airborne particles. Agricultural workers face a myriad of challenges in obtaining a proper fit test and who can provide this service. Additionally, there are gray areas of misunderstanding about the fit testing mandates in certain agricultural populations.

    Summary
    Respiratory PPE fit testing helps assure the best protection against dangerous airborne particles. Agricultural workers face a myriad of challenges in obtaining a proper fit test and who can provide this service. Additionally, there are gray areas of misunderstanding about the fit testing mandates in certain agricultural populations. 
    Intended Audience:  Agricultural workers, including women in agriculture; managers and owners of agricultural businesses; educational and healthcare organizations serving an agricultural population.
    Objectives
    Upon completion of this webinar, participants in this webinar will : 
     - understand the difference between a respirator fit test and a fit check (seal check) procedure
     - determine who should be fit tested for respiratory personal protective equipment (PPE) 
     - know who can perform a fit test what tools are necessary for a fit test procedure
     - locate current reliable resources that provide information on respiratory fit testing

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Eliminating Workplace Violence in the Field for Employers (June 10, 2020)

    Contains 6 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/10/2020

    Thirty-six percent of the 3.4 million producers counted in the census are women. Education will focus on all women including farmworker women and their employers on reporting violent incidents to authorities, making employees aware of their legal rights, safe work practices, medical referrals, treatment, and options including counseling if needed. Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Thirty-six percent of the 3.4 million producers counted in the census are women. Education will focus on all women including farmworker women and their employers on reporting violent incidents to authorities, making employees aware of their legal rights, safe work practices, medical referrals, treatment, and options including counseling if needed.
    Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators,  health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting. 
    Objectives Upon completion of this webinar, participants will understand the following concepts:
    1. The scope and nature of workplace violence occurring in agriculture today.
    2. Employers' responsibilities in addressing workplace violence and implementing preventive measures.
    3. Effective strategies and interventions that can make the workplace safer and more responsive to employee-victims.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Best PPE to Protect Your Lungs (June 4, 2020)

    Contains 10 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/04/2020

    Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge. Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education

    Summary:  Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge.  Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education
    Intended audience: The primary audience for this program will be rural health care providers, educators, and agribusiness safety managers
    Objectives (Focus areas): At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to: 
    1. List at least three sources of common agricultural respiratory hazards 
    2. Identify appropriate respiratory protection equipment for women working in agriculture 
    3. Access a minimum of three evidence- based resources for use in respiratory health and safety education for women working in agricultural environments.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Prevention of Back Injuries (June 2, 2020)

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/02/2020

    Back injuries are one of the most common forms of farm-related injuries, so protecting the back is one of the most important things a producer can do to stay active on the farm. Men and women are both prone to work-related back pain and the first episode usually occurs between the ages of 20 and 40. Training will focus on effects of whole body vibration, causes of back injuries/pain, how to prevent back injuries/pain, and other considerations. Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Back injuries are one of the most common forms of farm-related injuries, so protecting the back is one of the most important things a producer can do to stay active on the farm. Men and women are both prone to work-related back pain and the first episode usually occurs between the ages of 20 and 40. Training will focus on effects of whole body vibration, causes of back injuries/pain, how to prevent back injuries/pain, and other considerations.
    Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting. 
    Objectives:
    Upon completion of this training, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify causes of back injuries/pain
    2. Explain and utilize strategies to prevent back injuries/pain
    3. Describe and utilize proper lifting techniques
    4. Describe effects of whole body vibration (WBV)
    5. Apply strategies for maintaining back health
    6. Recall ways to manage chronic pain

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 


    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Sleepless in America

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention now identifies sleep deficiency as a public health problem. Sleep affects every moment of our daily lives, from how we think and remember to how our bodies thrive or deteriorate. It determines how we deal with stress, make choices related to safety, and function as human beings. While most health education tends to focus on nutrition and activity, sleep is arguably the single most important factor in maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and lack of it causes a significantly reduced quality of life. This presenter proposes that we prioritize sleep and improve daily sleep hygiene to enhance every facet of our well-being.​ Intended audience: All adults can benefit

    Summary: The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention now identifies sleep deficiency as a public health problem.  Sleep affects every moment of our daily lives, from how we think and remember to how our bodies thrive or deteriorate. It determines how we deal with stress, make choices related to safety, and function as human beings. While most health education tends to focus on nutrition and activity, sleep is arguably the single most important factor in maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and lack of it causes a significantly reduced quality of life.  This presenter proposes that we prioritize sleep and improve daily sleep hygiene to enhance every facet of our well-being.
    Intended audience: All adults can benefit
    Objectives:
    • - Participants will discover surprising functions of sleep and how lack of it affects the mind and body
    • - Participants will learn daily habits that interfere with a good night of sleep
    • - Participants will learn 30 sleep tips and tricks to customize a plan that impacts overall well-being.

    Susan Harris

    Educator – Rural Health, Wellness, and Safety University of Nebraska Extension

    Susan has a 14-year history of education, liaison, and administrative work in health, wellness, and safety.  The passion she brings to teaching about the crucial need for quality sleep is derived from personal experience and curiosity about sleep.  This has resulted in extensive research on the topic and interviews with pulmonologists, physicians, sleep center managers, sleep study patients, professors, and research experts.  Susan’s education includes a bachelor’s degree in Family and Consumer Sciences in Business, as well as a master’s degree in Health and Human Performance – Gerontology. 

  • Weekly Think Tank: COVID-19 Ag Task Force Response Recordings

    Contains 9 Component(s)

    COVID-19 is threatening agricultural communities on many fronts. This is a discussion with rural health and safety professionals, Ag commodity associations, NPOs, government agencies, academia and the agricultural community. The goal of these weekly think tanks is to identify risks that farmers, farm workers and ranchers face as it relates to COVID-19. This is where all weekly recordings of the think tanks will be housed.

    COVID-19 is threatening agricultural communities on many fronts. This is a discussion with rural health and safety professionals, Ag commodity associations, NPOs, government agencies, academia and the agricultural community. The goal of these weekly think tanks is to identify risks that farmers, farm workers and ranchers face as it relates to COVID-19.  This is where all weekly recordings of the think tanks will be housed.

    We need to keep our COVID-19 Response discussions moving towards innovation and collaboration. Therefore, we will hold weekly web based think tanks for this purpose starting April 2nd through the end of May on Thursdays at 11am CDT. All are welcome to attend.

    If you would like to register for the weekly COVID19 Rapid Response think tanks LIVE, CLICK HERE.

    Thank you to our generous sponsors:

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  • Reducing the Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Perinatal Illness for Female Ag. Producers (May 27, 2020)

    Contains 5 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/27/2020

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges.

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges. 
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify unique exposures/risks associated with farm tasks.
    2. Identify at least four reproductive health and safety issues for women. 
    3. Locate three current evidenced based resources in the field of agricultural health 
    4. Develop Hazard Map of work exposures.
    5. Select appropriate PPE for farm tasks to reduce or eliminate exposures and or risks.
    Intended Audience:
    Supervisor or Managers: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators,  health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.
     Producers: This training is intended primarily for agricultural producers including but not limited to farmers, ranchers, and any person or persons involved in some combination of raising field crops, orchards, vineyards, horticulture, or other livestock.
    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Talking to Farmers About Their Pain

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    The occupational hazards that farmers face put them at greater risk for acute and chronic pain as a result of ergonomic repetition, accident, or surgical procedure. Addressing specific occupational sources of pain and what activities the pain inhibits are crucial to improving treatment. This module will focus on how to transform the conversation between provider and patient to improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction.

    The occupational hazards that farmers face put them at greater risk for acute and chronic pain as a result of ergonomic repetition, accident, or surgical procedure. Addressing specific occupational sources of pain and what activities the pain inhibits are crucial to improving treatment. This module will focus on how to transform the conversation between provider and patient to improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction.
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1.  Understand the prevalence of occupational hazards amongst farming occupations.
    2.  Recognize occupational implications as they relate to acute and chronic pain.
    3.  Gain strategies to improve provider-patient conversations about occupational farmer pain.
    4.  Identify patient resources to aid in facilitating candid discussion about pain.
    Sponsored by:

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    This project was supported by the FY17 USDA NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant # 2017-46100-27225 and the FY18 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants (ROTA) # TI-18-022

    Alison Hartman, DPT, CF-L1

    Consulting PT, DPT, CF-L1 Pro-Activity North Carolina

    Clinically trained as a Doctor of Physical Therapy, Ali harbors a deep appreciation for the human body and the resilience it holds. Unlike traditional rehabilitation professionals, Ali spends the majority of her time outside of the clinic walls, embedding herself within working populations to maximize the health, well-being, and performance of groups and individuals while leveraging her unique experience in workplace prevention and health promotion. She has completed advanced certifications in Applied Prevention and Health Promotion Therapies, and residency at Pro-Activity, a human achievement company that has specialized in workplace prevention and health promotion with industrialized workforces for the pasts 20 years. Ali was recently named managing partner of Pro-Activity’s North Carolina field office. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

    Continuing Health Professional Education is available for this webinar for free to licensed health care providers in the state of Mississippi. For health care providers outside of Mississippi, the continuing education is available for $40 per CE hour.

    PhysicianAMA The University of Mississippi School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Mississippi School of Medicine designates this e-learning activity for a maximum of (number of credits)AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the educational activity.   

    Dental- ADA CERP – American Dental Association Continuing Education Recognition Program. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider. ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry designates this activity for 1.0 continuing education credits.

    Nursing- The University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing is approved as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by The Mississippi Nurses Foundation, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. As an approved provider, the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing awards this activity 1.0 contact hour(s).

    Social Work- This organization The University of Mississippi Medical Center provider number SWB 120016 is approved as a provider for continuing education by the Mississippi Board of Examiners and Marriage & Family Therapists; Approval Period: 1/15/2020 through 1/15/2022 Social workers will receive 1.0 continuing education clock hours in participating in this course General.

    Pharmacy- The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. Upon successful completion of this activity, seminar registrants will have continuing pharmacy education credit posted to their MyCPE Monitor (www.mycpemonitor.net). This seminar has been approved for (1.0 CEUs) by the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, Division of Pharmacy Professional Development. ACPE number: 0032-9999-19-078-H01-P

    CHPE- This activity is approved by the University of Mississippi Medical Center Division of Continuing Health Professional Education for a maximum of 1.0 contact hours.

    Emergency Medical Services- This offering has been approved for 1.0 EMS continuing education credit by the Mississippi Bureau of Emergency Medical Services.

    For more information on courses and continuing education, please visit- https://learning.agrisafe.org/opioid-misuse-prevention

  • Assessment of Opioid Misuse Risk Among Farmers in the Clinical Setting

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Prescription opioids are often the first-line therapy to treat chronic and acute pain among farmers. Prescribing opioids to farmer populations that may not seek regular treatment or have access to alternative therapies increases the risk for potential opioid misuse. Properly assessing for these characteristics among other abuse or addiction risk factors, is critical in providing treatment that is both appropriate and effective. The training module will seek to provide insight on misuse risk factors among farmers to better inform healthcare providers on warning signs in this specific cohort.

    Prescription opioids are often the first-line therapy to treat chronic and acute pain among farmers. Prescribing opioids to farmer populations that may not seek regular treatment or have access to alternative therapies increases the risk for potential opioid misuse. Properly assessing for these characteristics among other abuse or addiction risk factors, is critical in providing treatment that is both appropriate and effective. The training module will seek to provide insight on misuse risk factors among farmers to better inform healthcare providers on warning signs in this specific cohort.
    By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: 
    1. List potential risk factors for opioid misuse among farmers.
    2. Understand proper opioid misuse assessment strategies.
    3. Identify effective alternatives for treating chronic and acute pain among farmers

    Sponsored by:

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    This project was supported by the FY17 USDA NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant # 2017-46100-27225 and the FY18 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants (ROTA) # TI-18-022

    Dr. Ali Hartman, DPT

    Consulting PT, CF-L1, Pro-Activity North Carolina

    Clinically trained as a Doctor of Physical Therapy, Ali harbors a deep appreciation for the human body and the resilience it holds. Unlike traditional rehabilitation professionals, Ali spends the majority of her time outside of the clinic walls, embedding herself within working populations to maximize the health, well-being, and performance of groups and individuals while leveraging her unique experience in workplace prevention and health promotion.

    She has completed advanced certifications in Applied Prevention and Health Promotion Therapies, and residency at Pro-Activity, a human achievement company that has specialized in workplace prevention and health promotion with industrialized workforces for the past 20 years. Ali was recently named managing partner of Pro-Activity’s North Carolina field office.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

    Continuing Health Professional Education is available for this webinar for free to licensed health care providers in the state of Mississippi. For health care providers outside of Mississippi, the continuing education is available for $40 per CE hour.

    PhysicianAMA The University of Mississippi School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Mississippi School of Medicine designates this e-learning activity for a maximum of (number of credits)AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the educational activity.   

    Dental- ADA CERP – American Dental Association Continuing Education Recognition Program. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider. ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry designates this activity for 1.0 continuing education credits.

    Nursing- The University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing is approved as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by The Mississippi Nurses Foundation, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. As an approved provider, the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing awards this activity 1.0 contact hour(s).

    Social Work- This organization The University of Mississippi Medical Center provider number SWB 120016 is approved as a provider for continuing education by the Mississippi Board of Examiners and Marriage & Family Therapists; Approval Period: 1/15/2020 through 1/15/2022 Social workers will receive 1.0 continuing education clock hours in participating in this course General.

    Pharmacy- The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. Upon successful completion of this activity, seminar registrants will have continuing pharmacy education credit posted to their MyCPE Monitor (www.mycpemonitor.net). This seminar has been approved for (1.0 CEUs) by the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, Division of Pharmacy Professional Development. ACPE number: 0032-9999-19-078-H01-P

    CHPE- This activity is approved by the University of Mississippi Medical Center Division of Continuing Health Professional Education for a maximum of 1.0 contact hours.

    Emergency Medical Services- This offering has been approved for 1.0 EMS continuing education credit by the Mississippi Bureau of Emergency Medical Services.

    For more information on courses and continuing education, please visit- https://learning.agrisafe.org/opioid-misuse-prevention

  • Safety Sensitivity of Opioid Use in High Hazardous Industries Such as Agriculture

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine released recommendations for opioid prescribing based on safety-sensitive occupations. Safety-sensitive work is typically classified as operating motor vehicles, modes of transportation, other heavy machinery, or tasks requiring high levels of cognitive function or judgment. Farm duties frequently demand the use of heavy machinery, and concurrent use of narcotics alongside safety-sensitive work can be dangerous. This training educates healthcare providers on how to assess occupational agricultural risks and corresponding patient guidance for those who are taking opioid medications.

    The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine released recommendations for opioid prescribing based on safety-sensitive occupations. Safety-sensitive work is typically classified as operating motor vehicles, modes of transportation, other heavy machinery, or tasks requiring high levels of cognitive function or judgment. Farm duties frequently demand the use of heavy machinery, and concurrent use of narcotics alongside safety-sensitive work can be dangerous. This training educates healthcare providers on how to assess occupational agricultural risks and corresponding patient guidance for those who are taking opioid medications.
    By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: 
    1. Identify what classifies as a safety-sensitive occupation and why
    2. Describe the dangers involved with prescription opioid use and safety-sensitive occupations
    3. Understand how best to discuss with patients who have safety-sensitive occupations alternatives to prescription opioids
    4. Identify best practices for naloxone prescribing and use in a rural or agricultural setting
    5. Discuss implications of medication assisted therapies for Opioid Use Disorder in safety-sensitive occupations

    Sponsored by:

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    This project was supported by the FY17 USDA NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant # 2017-46100-27225 and the FY18 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants (ROTA) # TI-18-022

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

    Heather Lyons-Burney, Pharm.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, UMKC School of Pharmacy at MSU

    Dr. Heather Lyons-Burney serves as a Clinical Assistant Professor for the UMKC School of Pharmacy’s satellite site at MSU in Springfield, Missouri. A PharmD graduate of UMKC School of Pharmacy, she completed a PGY1 residency with Cox Health Systems in Springfield. Throughout her career she has promoted the profession of pharmacy and has encouraged the development of team-based patient-centered care and innovative services in the community practice setting, as well as the importance of community engagement.. Locally, Heather serves on the clinic’s Board, as well as co-Chairs both the Taney and Greene county coalitions focused on prevention of substance misuse – receiving the Generation Rx Champions Award in 2012, and a Southwest Missouri Jefferson Award in 2018.  In November 2018, she received the ACT Missouri’s Champion of Change for Prevention statewide award for her continuous prevention efforts.  

    Ann Marie Butler Kemp, MD

    Professor and Associate Director Family Medicine Residency Program, Associate Professor Clinical Pharmacy, USCIS Civil Surgeon, University of Mississippi Medical Center

    Dr. Kemp currently serves as Professor and Associate Director Residency Program UMMC Family Medicine Department at UMMC. She is also has a faculty appointment with University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy as an Associate Professor Clinical Pharmacy Practice. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Family Physicians and an USCIS Civil Surgeon. She also serves as Chair of the UMMC Opioid Task Force.

    Continuing Health Professional Education is available for this webinar for free to licensed health care providers in the state of Mississippi. For health care providers outside of Mississippi, the continuing education is available for $40 per CE hour.

    PhysicianAMA The University of Mississippi School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Mississippi School of Medicine designates this e-learning activity for a maximum of (number of credits)AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the educational activity.   

    Dental- ADA CERP – American Dental Association Continuing Education Recognition Program. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider. ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry designates this activity for 1.0 continuing education credits.

    Nursing- The University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing is approved as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by The Mississippi Nurses Foundation, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. As an approved provider, the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing awards this activity 1.0 contact hour(s).

    Social Work- This organization The University of Mississippi Medical Center provider number SWB 120016 is approved as a provider for continuing education by the Mississippi Board of Examiners and Marriage & Family Therapists; Approval Period: 1/15/2020 through 1/15/2022 Social workers will receive 1.0 continuing education clock hours in participating in this course General.

    Pharmacy- The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. Upon successful completion of this activity, seminar registrants will have continuing pharmacy education credit posted to their MyCPE Monitor (www.mycpemonitor.net). This seminar has been approved for (1.0 CEUs) by the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, Division of Pharmacy Professional Development. ACPE number: 0032-9999-19-078-H01-P

    CHPE- This activity is approved by the University of Mississippi Medical Center Division of Continuing Health Professional Education for a maximum of 1.0 contact hours.

    Emergency Medical Services- This offering has been approved for 1.0 EMS continuing education credit by the Mississippi Bureau of Emergency Medical Services.

    For more information on courses and continuing education, please visit- https://learning.agrisafe.org/opioid-misuse-prevention