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  • Ergonomic Safety for Farm Women

    Contains 6 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/17/2019

    It is no secret - women are playing an increased role in production agriculture. They account for about one-third of the management, ownership and work on farms, ranches and in crop production. A major challenge continues to be access to protective equipment that meets the ergonomic needs of women. This program is intended to help women in rural/agricultural communities identify ergonomic issues leading to musculoskeletal injuries in farm and ranch work and discover resources to aid in injury prevention.

    It is no secret - women are playing an increased role in production agriculture. They account for about one-third of the management, ownership and work on farms, ranches and in crop production. A major challenge continues to be access to protective equipment that meets the ergonomic needs of women. This program is intended to help women in rural/agricultural communities identify ergonomic issues leading to musculoskeletal injuries in farm and ranch work and discover resources to aid in injury prevention.
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify work site hazards and potential musculoskeletal injuries.
    2. Identify wellness initiatives aimed at reducing risks related to musculoskeletal injuries.
    3. Locate three current evidenced based resources in the field of agricultural health and safety that address ergonomic safety.
    4. Utilize the individual AgHRA to look at current exposures and preventive methods for daily farm tasks. 
    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 
  • Respiratory Health and Personal Protective Equipment for Ag Producers

    Contains 6 Component(s)

    This presentation will provide participants with training and resources to assist clients in the selection and use of personal protective equipment appropriate for agricultural exposures. Providing adequate protection from the multiple respiratory hazards in production agriculture can be a difficult process. This material was produced under a grant (SH-31230-SH7) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government

    This presentation will provide participants with training and resources to assist clients in the selection and use of personal protective equipment appropriate for agricultural exposures. Providing adequate protection from the multiple respiratory hazards in production agriculture can be a difficult process. This material was produced under a grant (SH-31230-SH7) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to: 
    1. List a minimum of four major agricultural workplace hazards 
    2. Describe at least two major respiratory illnesses caused by agricultural workplace exposures 
    3. Identify and describe a minimum of three types of respiratory protection used in the agricultural workplace. 
    5. Discuss four evidence based resources used in personal protective equipment education for clinicians and patient/client information.


    This material was produced under a grant (SH-31230-SH7) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • The Rise of Opioid Use in Rural Communities - Prevalence and Strategies

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    This webinar will describe state and local efforts to promote prevention and access to treatment and analyze national data on the prevalence of opioid in rural and urban settings. We conducted interviews with state-level key informants in four states to understand the challenges and promising practices in monitoring opiate prescribing and diversion, developing prevention interventions, and developing an opioid prevention and treatment infrastructure in rural communities.

    This webinar will describe state and local efforts to promote prevention and access to treatment and analyze national data on the prevalence of opioid in rural and urban settings. We conducted interviews with state-level key informants in four states to understand the challenges and promising practices in monitoring opiate prescribing and diversion, developing prevention interventions, and developing an opioid prevention and treatment infrastructure in rural communities.
    To inform our choice of states and key informants, we recruited a panel of experts from federal agencies, policy centers and professional organizations to obtain their suggestions. Final selected states included North Carolina, Indiana, Vermont, and Washington. We also used data from the National Survey of Drug Use and Health to examine the prevalence of non-medical use of pain relievers and heroin in the past year in rural and urban areas and the socio-demographic and economic characteristics associated with their use. Additionally, we examined perception of risk in using heroin, injection drug use practices, driving under the influence, and law enforcement involvement.

    John Gale, MS

    Senior Research Associate, Population Health & Health Policy Program and Maine Rural Health Research Center, University of Southern Maine

    John Gale has over a decade of experience in rural health and rural mental health research as well as sixteen years senior management experience in primary care, mental health and substance abuse practices. He has published a number of articles, reports, and book chapters in the areas of rural mental health, safety net, primary care, and hospital issues. His work has included studies of the national Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Program, the informal safety net in rural communities, and the use of state health policy research to inform federal and state policy; surveys of Rural Health Clinics; evaluations of the state Rural Hospital Flexibility Programs in Maine and New Hampshire; an assessment of the RWJ Southern Rural Access Program; and the management of the Mental Health Technical Assistance Program for the Mental Health Funding Collaborative in Maine.

  • Addressing the Epidemic of ATV Injuries and Deaths: Safety Training Materials and Educational Demonstrations

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    ATVs are used in agriculture as a substitute for pick-up trucks, horses, and just moving about. In 2015, there were 340 deaths and over 97,000 injuries reported involving ATVs that were being used for recreation and work purposes. This webinar will discuss the burden of ATV incidents and provide links to ATV safety training materials that are currently available. Information on ATV safety simulators will be presented. A blueprint will be provided to participants for creating a low-cost, portable, hands-on ATV safety demonstration.

    ATVs are used in agriculture as a substitute for pick-up trucks, horses, and just moving about. In 2015, there were 340 deaths and over 97,000 injuries reported involving ATVs that were being used for recreation and work purposes. This webinar will discuss the burden of ATV incidents and provide links to ATV safety training materials that are currently available. Information on ATV safety simulators will be presented. A blueprint will be provided to participants for creating a low-cost, portable, hands-on ATV safety demonstration.
    At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:
    1. Understand the burden of ATV injuries and fatalities in the agricultural community. 
    2. Be able to access up-to-date educational materials on the safe use of ATVs and on proper personal protective equipment. 
    3. Understand how ATV simulators can be used as an educational tool to convey safety messages. 
    4. Have all the information needed to create a low-cost ATV demonstration. 

    Aaron Yoder, PhD

    Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental, Agricultural and Occupational Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE

    Aaron Yoder's overall research interest is to improve the health of workers in agriculture and related industries through science based research, product development and outreach. His specific interests are in the research and development of sound ergonomic and human factors principles and technologies that will lead to healthier and safer workers in agriculture and related industries through the reduction of hazards associated with these types of injuries.

    Ellen Duysen, MPH

    Community Outreach Specialist and Coordinator - Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health (CS-CASH) Department of Environmental, Agricultural and Occupational Health, UNMC

    As Center Coordinator for CS-CASH, Ms. Duysen provides the Center Director with assistance in planning, coordinating, and monitoring the 23 projects funded by the Center. These projects encompass research, prevention/intervention, education/translation, outreach, evaluation, and cross-disciplinary efforts. She engages in internal and external advisory committees, oversees fiscal and resource management, maintains records, and compiles Center reports. Ms. Duysen is the course director for the annual, week-long Ag Medicine Course that provides continuing education credits to health care providers across the US. In addition to administrative responsibilities, she is involved with the Center's active Outreach program. The program delivers educational materials, demonstrations, and presentations on the topics of respiratory and hearing protection, as well as injury prevention to the agricultural community in the Center's seven states region.

  • Providing Culturally Competent Care for Farmers and Farm Families, With Emphasis on Mental Well-Being

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    Alarming rates of suicide among production farmers have prompted public health officials to increase the awareness and cultural understanding of providing wholistic care for those in rural agricultural areas. Unique aspects of farm life and farming can contribute to higher levels of depressive symptoms and increased stress. Higher levels of depression, in addition to suicide, can also increase a farmer’s risk of injury and development of chronic disease, impacting overall quality of life. The agrarian culture is one of strong work ethic, self-sufficiency, conservative views, and adherence to gender roles, which can make discussion of mental well-being distinctly different from clients who are not from the agrarian culture. The training module will seek to provide insight on the aspects of providing healthcare for farmers and farm families as it relates to the culture and occupational aspects of farming and farm life. Objectives: By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: Have a greater understanding of the agrarian culture. Apply key concepts of the culture when proving healthcare for farmers and farm families. Identify barriers of seeking mental wellness in a rural, agricultural community

     Alarming rates of suicide among production farmers have prompted public health officials to increase the awareness and cultural understanding of providing wholistic care for those in rural agricultural areas. Unique aspects of farm life and farming can contribute to higher levels of depressive symptoms and increased stress. Higher levels of depression, in addition to suicide, can also increase a farmer’s risk of injury and development of chronic disease, impacting overall quality of life. The agrarian culture is one of strong work ethic, self-sufficiency, conservative views, and adherence to gender roles, which can make discussion of mental well-being distinctly different from clients who are not from the agrarian culture. The training module will seek to provide insight on the aspects of providing healthcare for farmers and farm families as it relates to the culture and occupational aspects of farming and farm life.
    Objectives:
    By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:
    1. Have a greater understanding of the agrarian culture.
    2. Apply key concepts of the culture when proving healthcare for farmers and farm families.
    3. Identify barriers of seeking mental wellness in a rural, agricultural community 


    Funded through the generous support of:

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    Federal Office of Rural Health Policy

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    Cheryl Dean-Witt, PhD, RN

    Primary Investigator, Eating Healthy in the Mountains

  • Invest in Your Health: Hazard Mapping in the Ag Classroom Oct 23

    Contains 6 Component(s)

    This Train the Training course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Participants will learn about the Hazard Mapping curriculum and will be given access to all teacher and student materials after completing the webinar.

    This Train the Training course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Participants will learn about the Hazard Mapping curriculum and will be given access to all teacher and student materials after completing the webinar.
    At the conclusion of the program, participants/educators will be able to: 
    1. To examine the hazards in agricultural production
    2. To identify and locate hazards so that those hazards can be targeted for elimination
    3. To embrace a participatory process that involves as many students as possible
    4. To respect the vast array of skill, experience and know-how that students have about their farm jobs and their dangers
    5. To collectively and creatively pool our knowledge and prioritize what problems to eliminate. 
    A Hazard Map is a visual representation of the workplace where there are hazards that could cause injuries or illness. The Hazard Mapping method draws on what students know from their farming experience.
    Other available Train the Trainer modules include:
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    Natalie Roy, MPH

    AgriSafe Executive Director

    As Executive Director of AgriSafe for over sixteen years, Natalie Roy utilizes her public health training to improve the quality of health care offered to farm families. Natalie holds a Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She is pleased to work in the area of agricultural health as it relates to her experience growing up on a farm in Canterbury New Hampshire.

  • Agricultural All-Terrain Vehicle Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    All-terrain vehicle (ATV) crashes are one of the leading causes of death and injuries in the agriculture industry in the United States. In this presentation, we will evaluate the current situation and possible solutions related to agricultural ATV safety. Potential injury preventative actions were evaluated based on the hierarchy of control, including elimination or substitution, engineering control, administrative authority, training, and personal protective equipment.

    All-terrain vehicle (ATV) crashes are one of the leading causes of death and injuries in the agriculture industry in the United States. In this presentation, we will evaluate the current situation and possible solutions related to agricultural ATV safety. Potential injury preventative actions were evaluated based on the hierarchy of control, including elimination or substitution, engineering control, administrative authority, training, and personal protective equipment. 

    At the end of the webinar, participants will:

    - Understand Recreational vs. Agricultural ATV incidents
    - Identify strategies for elimination or substitution to prevent injury
    - Recognize engineering controls: Roll-Over Protective Structure (ROPS), Crush Prevention Device (CPD)
    - Describe administrative authority: United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, Israel, and New Zealand
    - Identify Personal Protective Equipment (helmet)

    Farzaneh Khorsandi, PhD

    Assistant Safety and Health Engineering Specialist in Cooperative Extension, University of California, Davis

    Her main research interest is on agricultural machinery safety with a focus on engineering control methods. She worked on several projects related to rollover protective structures for tractors as a research assistant at the University of Tennessee. She is working on several projects related to agricultural ATV safety at the University of California, Davis. She is developing the first Agricultural ATV safety test station in the United States at UC, Davis.  

     

    Paul D. Ayers, PhD

    Professor, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

  • Invest In Your Health - Train the Trainer Course

    Contains 24 Component(s)

    AgriSafe is offering this Train-the-Trainer series to anyone who works with youth (ages 14-23 years). The series of modules will walk you through 5 target areas and includes an instructor guide after completing each topic.

    AgriSafe is offering this Train-the-Trainer series to anyone who works with youth (ages 14-23 years). The series of modules will walk you through 5 target areas and includes an instructor guide after completing each topic. These train the trainer courses will help prepare you to teach on each of the topic areas included. You will have the opportunity to increase your knowledge and will receive an instructor guide to use with your students or young workers. The modules include On-Demand webinars, Classroom Learning Activities, as well as an Instructor Guidebook. If you would like more information click here to view a webinar describing the IYH program.
    Train the Trainer Course Topics Include:
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    Once all five modules are completed the instructor will earn an Invest in Your Health Instructor Scholar certificate. Using AgriSafe's online Learning Lab, instructors have the capability to use the provided materials in a classroom setting to educate students. Upon request, students are also eligible to receive an Invest in Your Health Student Scholar certificate of completion once they complete the assigned modules under the guidance of the instructor. Under our open share platform, once certified, you would be free to use the training materials in your classroom setting. Our end goal is to build the capacity of local Ag educators, rural health professionals and rural leaders to train young Ag producers.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

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    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association’s and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

    Natalie Roy, MPH

    AgriSafe Executive Director

    As Executive Director of AgriSafe for over sixteen years, Natalie Roy utilizes her public health training to improve the quality of health care offered to farm families. Natalie holds a Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She is pleased to work in the area of agricultural health as it relates to her experience growing up on a farm in Canterbury New Hampshire.

    Marjorie McCullagh, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC, COHN-S, FAAOHN, FAAN

    Professor and Occupational Health Nursing Program Director, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    Dr. McCullagh's career has focused on occupational health and safety, particularly as it relates to use of personal protection devices among farm operators and their families. Since 1985 she has had an active program of research in mitigating hazardous occupational exposures. She has conducted several randomized clinical trials, comparing the effectiveness of several approaches to influencing use of personal protective equipment. Dr. McCullagh is an associate professor and Director of the Occupational Health Nursing program at the University of Michigan School of Nursing.

    Linda Emanuel, RN

    Community Health Nurse, AgriSafe Network

    Good health advocacy has been at the heart of Linda’s essence from her formative years as a farm girl in eastern Nebraska. Graduating from Nebraska Methodist School of Nursing in 1985, she worked as an R.N. in a variety of acute care hospital settings for over 30 years. She and her husband Tom raised three sons on a successful row crop operation that has been able to welcome the next generation and their families home to continue to diversify their family business. Linda served as a Fellow in the Nebraska LEAD program and has also received agrimedicine training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Linda now serves on the advisory board for CS-CASH and a member of the AgriSafe team, as a Community Health Nurse.

    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett has her BS in Molecular Biology from Defiance College, MS in Environmental Toxicology from Texas Tech University, and is currently a DVM candidate at Michigan State University. Her passion for public health began during a water testing project in Tanzania, Africa and has continued to evolve and include research focused on wildlife diseases and vector-borne zoonoses. Katelyn also served as a member of the AgriSafe Young Advisors Council, from 2016-2017. In her role as a rural leader, she assisted AgriSafe in design and launching of educational initiatives that can reduce farm related illness, injury and fatalities.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Reducing the Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Perinatal Illness for Female Ag. Producers

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges.

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges. 
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify unique exposures/risks associated with farm tasks.
    2. Identify at least four reproductive health and safety issues for women. 
    3. Locate three current evidenced based resources in the field of agricultural health 
    4. Develop Hazard Map of work exposures.
    5. Select appropriate PPE for farm tasks to reduce or eliminate exposures and or risks.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association’s and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Hazard Communications Standards

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    This Hazard Communication Standard training program is intended for female workers and managers in the agricultural industry. This includes dairy farms and small farms that hire at-risk populations. The major focus of the program is on the identification of and the safe usage of chemicals and pesticides, along with respiratory protection.

    This Hazard Communication Standard training program is intended for female workers and managers in the agricultural industry. This includes dairy farms and small farms that hire at-risk populations. The major focus of the program is on the identification of and the safe usage of chemicals and pesticides, along with respiratory protection.
    At the conclusion of the training, participants will be able to: 
    1. Describe the purpose of OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HCS)
    2. Explain the basic requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard
    3. Differentiate between physical and health hazards of agricultural chemicals
    4. Recall the requirements of a written hazard communication program
    5. List the components of a hazard communication training program
    6. Interpret the information contained in Safety Data Sheets (SDS)
    7. Describe the requirements and purpose of hazard warning labels.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.