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  • Best PPE to Protect Your Lungs (June 4, 2020)

    Contains 10 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/04/2020

    Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge. Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education

    Summary:  Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge.  Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education
    Intended audience: The primary audience for this program will be rural health care providers, educators, and agribusiness safety managers
    Objectives (Focus areas): At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to: 
    1. List at least three sources of common agricultural respiratory hazards 
    2. Identify appropriate respiratory protection equipment for women working in agriculture 
    3. Access a minimum of three evidence- based resources for use in respiratory health and safety education for women working in agricultural environments.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Prevention of Back Injuries (June 2, 2020)

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/02/2020

    Back injuries are one of the most common forms of farm-related injuries, so protecting the back is one of the most important things a producer can do to stay active on the farm. Men and women are both prone to work-related back pain and the first episode usually occurs between the ages of 20 and 40. Training will focus on effects of whole body vibration, causes of back injuries/pain, how to prevent back injuries/pain, and other considerations. Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Back injuries are one of the most common forms of farm-related injuries, so protecting the back is one of the most important things a producer can do to stay active on the farm. Men and women are both prone to work-related back pain and the first episode usually occurs between the ages of 20 and 40. Training will focus on effects of whole body vibration, causes of back injuries/pain, how to prevent back injuries/pain, and other considerations.
    Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting. 
    Objectives:
    Upon completion of this training, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify causes of back injuries/pain
    2. Explain and utilize strategies to prevent back injuries/pain
    3. Describe and utilize proper lifting techniques
    4. Describe effects of whole body vibration (WBV)
    5. Apply strategies for maintaining back health
    6. Recall ways to manage chronic pain

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 


    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Sleepless in America

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention now identifies sleep deficiency as a public health problem. Sleep affects every moment of our daily lives, from how we think and remember to how our bodies thrive or deteriorate. It determines how we deal with stress, make choices related to safety, and function as human beings. While most health education tends to focus on nutrition and activity, sleep is arguably the single most important factor in maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and lack of it causes a significantly reduced quality of life. This presenter proposes that we prioritize sleep and improve daily sleep hygiene to enhance every facet of our well-being.​ Intended audience: All adults can benefit

    Summary: The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention now identifies sleep deficiency as a public health problem.  Sleep affects every moment of our daily lives, from how we think and remember to how our bodies thrive or deteriorate. It determines how we deal with stress, make choices related to safety, and function as human beings. While most health education tends to focus on nutrition and activity, sleep is arguably the single most important factor in maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and lack of it causes a significantly reduced quality of life.  This presenter proposes that we prioritize sleep and improve daily sleep hygiene to enhance every facet of our well-being.
    Intended audience: All adults can benefit
    Objectives:
    • - Participants will discover surprising functions of sleep and how lack of it affects the mind and body
    • - Participants will learn daily habits that interfere with a good night of sleep
    • - Participants will learn 30 sleep tips and tricks to customize a plan that impacts overall well-being.

    Susan Harris

    Educator – Rural Health, Wellness, and Safety University of Nebraska Extension

    Susan has a 14-year history of education, liaison, and administrative work in health, wellness, and safety.  The passion she brings to teaching about the crucial need for quality sleep is derived from personal experience and curiosity about sleep.  This has resulted in extensive research on the topic and interviews with pulmonologists, physicians, sleep center managers, sleep study patients, professors, and research experts.  Susan’s education includes a bachelor’s degree in Family and Consumer Sciences in Business, as well as a master’s degree in Health and Human Performance – Gerontology. 

  • Weekly Think Tank: COVID-19 Ag Task Force Response Recordings

    Contains 9 Component(s)

    COVID-19 is threatening agricultural communities on many fronts. This is a discussion with rural health and safety professionals, Ag commodity associations, NPOs, government agencies, academia and the agricultural community. The goal of these weekly think tanks is to identify risks that farmers, farm workers and ranchers face as it relates to COVID-19. This is where all weekly recordings of the think tanks will be housed.

    COVID-19 is threatening agricultural communities on many fronts. This is a discussion with rural health and safety professionals, Ag commodity associations, NPOs, government agencies, academia and the agricultural community. The goal of these weekly think tanks is to identify risks that farmers, farm workers and ranchers face as it relates to COVID-19.  This is where all weekly recordings of the think tanks will be housed.

    We need to keep our COVID-19 Response discussions moving towards innovation and collaboration. Therefore, we will hold weekly web based think tanks for this purpose starting April 2nd through the end of May on Thursdays at 11am CDT. All are welcome to attend.

    If you would like to register for the weekly COVID19 Rapid Response think tanks LIVE, CLICK HERE.

    Thank you to our generous sponsors:

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  • Reducing the Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Perinatal Illness for Female Ag. Producers (May 27, 2020)

    Contains 5 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/27/2020

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges.

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges. 
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify unique exposures/risks associated with farm tasks.
    2. Identify at least four reproductive health and safety issues for women. 
    3. Locate three current evidenced based resources in the field of agricultural health 
    4. Develop Hazard Map of work exposures.
    5. Select appropriate PPE for farm tasks to reduce or eliminate exposures and or risks.
    Intended Audience:
    Supervisor or Managers: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators,  health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.
     Producers: This training is intended primarily for agricultural producers including but not limited to farmers, ranchers, and any person or persons involved in some combination of raising field crops, orchards, vineyards, horticulture, or other livestock.
    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Using Naloxone to Reverse Opioid Overdose in the Agricultural Workplace: Information for Employers and Workers

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    In 2018, the U.S. Surgeon General called for increased awareness and availability of naloxone, the opioid antagonist, to reverse the effects of opioid overdose. Despite the rise in the dispensing of naloxone, there is a significant gap in our response across all sectors of society. In the rural parts of our country, where emergency response times can be dangerously long, developing a workplace naloxone availability and use program could ultimately save lives. This webinar will share information from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to help employers and workers understand the risk of opioid overdose and the role of naloxone.

    In 2018, the U.S. Surgeon General called for increased awareness and availability of naloxone, the opioid antagonist, to reverse the effects of opioid overdose. Despite the rise in the dispensing of naloxone, there is a significant gap in our response across all sectors of society. In the rural parts of our country, where emergency response times can be dangerously long, developing a workplace naloxone availability and use program could ultimately save lives. This webinar will share information from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to help employers and workers understand the risk of opioid overdose and the role of naloxone. 
    By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: 
    1. Discuss what medications are prescription and illicit opioids and what is OUD (Opioid Use Disorder) 
    2. Describe the dangers of opioids in the workplace and OUD for safety-sensitive occupations 
    3. Discuss the role of naloxone in opioid overdose 
    4. Discuss the implementation of workplace naloxone use programs 
    5. Understand the administration of the dosage forms available for naloxone used in an emergency
    Sponsored by:
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    This project was supported by the FY17 USDA NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant # 2017-46100-27225 and the FY18 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants (ROTA) # TI-18-022

    Heather Lyons-Burney, Pharm.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, UMKC School of Pharmacy at MSU

    Dr. Heather Lyons-Burney serves as a Clinical Assistant Professor for the UMKC School of Pharmacy’s satellite site at MSU in Springfield, Missouri. A PharmD graduate of UMKC School of Pharmacy, she completed a PGY1 residency with Cox Health Systems in Springfield. Throughout her career she has promoted the profession of pharmacy and has encouraged the development of team-based patient-centered care and innovative services in the community practice setting, as well as the importance of community engagement.. Locally, Heather serves on the clinic’s Board, as well as co-Chairs both the Taney and Greene county coalitions focused on prevention of substance misuse – receiving the Generation Rx Champions Award in 2012, and a Southwest Missouri Jefferson Award in 2018.  In November 2018, she received the ACT Missouri’s Champion of Change for Prevention statewide award for her continuous prevention efforts.  

    PhysicianAMA The University of Mississippi School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Mississippi School of Medicine designates this e-learning activity for a maximum of (number of credits)AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the educational activity.   

    Dental- ADA CERP – American Dental Association Continuing Education Recognition Program. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider. ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry designates this activity for 1.0 continuing education credits.

    Nursing- The University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing is approved as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by The Mississippi Nurses Foundation, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. As an approved provider, the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing awards this activity 1.0 contact hour(s).

    Social Work- This organization The University of Mississippi Medical Center provider number SWB 120016 is approved as a provider for continuing education by the Mississippi Board of Examiners and Marriage & Family Therapists; Approval Period: 1/15/2020 through 1/15/2022 Social workers will receive 1.0 continuing education clock hours in participating in this course General.

    Pharmacy- The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. Upon successful completion of this activity, seminar registrants will have continuing pharmacy education credit posted to their MyCPE Monitor (www.mycpemonitor.net). This seminar has been approved for (1.0 CEUs) by the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, Division of Pharmacy Professional Development. ACPE number: 0032-9999-19-079-H01-P

    CHPE- This activity is approved by the University of Mississippi Medical Center Division of Continuing Health Professional Education for a maximum of 1.0 contact hours.

    Emergency Medical Services- This offering has been approved for 1.0 EMS continuing education credit by the Mississippi Bureau of Emergency Medical Services.

    For more information contact- Knesha Rose-Davison, 866-312-3002 or visit https://learning.agrisafe.org/...

  • Talking to Farmers About Their Pain

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    The occupational hazards that farmers face put them at greater risk for acute and chronic pain as a result of ergonomic repetition, accident, or surgical procedure. Addressing specific occupational sources of pain and what activities the pain inhibits are crucial to improving treatment. This module will focus on how to transform the conversation between provider and patient to improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction.

    The occupational hazards that farmers face put them at greater risk for acute and chronic pain as a result of ergonomic repetition, accident, or surgical procedure. Addressing specific occupational sources of pain and what activities the pain inhibits are crucial to improving treatment. This module will focus on how to transform the conversation between provider and patient to improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction.
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1.  Understand the prevalence of occupational hazards amongst farming occupations.
    2.  Recognize occupational implications as they relate to acute and chronic pain.
    3.  Gain strategies to improve provider-patient conversations about occupational farmer pain.
    4.  Identify patient resources to aid in facilitating candid discussion about pain.
    Sponsored by:

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    This project was supported by the FY17 USDA NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant # 2017-46100-27225 and the FY18 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants (ROTA) # TI-18-022

    Alison Hartman, DPT, CF-L1

    Consulting PT, DPT, CF-L1 Pro-Activity North Carolina

    Clinically trained as a Doctor of Physical Therapy, Ali harbors a deep appreciation for the human body and the resilience it holds. Unlike traditional rehabilitation professionals, Ali spends the majority of her time outside of the clinic walls, embedding herself within working populations to maximize the health, well-being, and performance of groups and individuals while leveraging her unique experience in workplace prevention and health promotion. She has completed advanced certifications in Applied Prevention and Health Promotion Therapies, and residency at Pro-Activity, a human achievement company that has specialized in workplace prevention and health promotion with industrialized workforces for the pasts 20 years. Ali was recently named managing partner of Pro-Activity’s North Carolina field office. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

    PhysicianAMA The University of Mississippi School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Mississippi School of Medicine designates this e-learning activity for a maximum of (number of credits)AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the educational activity.   

    Dental- ADA CERP – American Dental Association Continuing Education Recognition Program. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider. ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry designates this activity for 1.0 continuing education credits.

    Nursing- The University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing is approved as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by The Mississippi Nurses Foundation, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. As an approved provider, the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing awards this activity 1.0 contact hour(s).

    Social Work- This organization The University of Mississippi Medical Center provider number SWB 120016 is approved as a provider for continuing education by the Mississippi Board of Examiners and Marriage & Family Therapists; Approval Period: 1/15/2020 through 1/15/2022 Social workers will receive 1.0 continuing education clock hours in participating in this course General.

    Pharmacy- The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. Upon successful completion of this activity, seminar registrants will have continuing pharmacy education credit posted to their MyCPE Monitor (www.mycpemonitor.net). This seminar has been approved for (1.0 CEUs) by the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, Division of Pharmacy Professional Development. ACPE number: 0032-9999-19-076-H01-P

    CHPE- This activity is approved by the University of Mississippi Medical Center Division of Continuing Health Professional Education for a maximum of 1.0 contact hours.

    Emergency Medical Services- This offering has been approved for 1.0 EMS continuing education credit by the Mississippi Bureau of Emergency Medical Services.

    For more information contact- Knesha Rose-Davison, 866-312-3002 or visit https://learning.agrisafe.org/...

  • How Mediation Can Help Farmers (May 20, 2020)

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Farming is a livelihood and a tradition for many families. It has its rewards, but also its unique risks and pressures. Those may stem from the markets, the weather, financial arrangements, family, neighbors, government regulations and more. Conflicts that arise when farming and its support systems fail to mesh add to the stress. How farmers resolve those conflicts can play a role in reducing stress. Learn how mediation engages farmers in problem solving that can meet their needs and make the world more manageable.

    Summary: Farming is a livelihood and a tradition for many families. It has its rewards, but also its unique risks and pressures. Those may stem from the markets, the weather, financial arrangements, family, neighbors, government regulations and more. Conflicts that arise when farming and its support systems fail to mesh add to the stress. How farmers resolve those conflicts can play a role in reducing stress. Learn how mediation engages farmers in problem solving that can meet their needs and make the world more manageable.  

    Intended audience: Farmers and organizations that work with farmers.  

    Objectives: By the end of this webinar participants will be able to-

    1. Explain what mediation is. 

    2. Describe how mediation can help the agricultural community, especially during the covid19 crisis. 

    3. Provide examples of how mediation has helped farmers.  

    4. Discuss what the Agricultural Mediation Program is. 

    5. Identify available resources in each state.


    This webinar is sponsored by:

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    ​Kate Pigott, JD

    Program Coordinator with the Michigan and Florida Agricultural Mediation Program

    Kate Pigott is a trained mediator and licensed attorney in Michigan. She currently works with the Michigan and Florida Agricultural Mediation Programs as their Program Coordinator. Previously, she worked for the Dispute Resolution Center of West Michigan which began her passion for the mediation process. Since 2014, she has worked with farmers and the agricultural community by empowering them to find productive solutions that help everyone move forward. Her purpose is to create safe space for others to resolve their differences.

    John Durling, Ph.D.

    Michigan Agricultural Mediation Program Outreach Coordinator

    John Durling represents the availability of Michigan Agricultural Mediation Program (MAMP) services to the agricultural community.  As a retired USDA-NRCS research agronomist and research farm manager he is well acquainted with the challenges of production agriculture.  In addition to working with MAMP John has a continuing managerial interest in his family farm and conducts seed field inspections with the Michigan Crop Improvement Association.  John’s PhD is from Michigan State University where his research emphasis was forage production systems.   

    David Gruber, JD.

    Executive Director of Roundtable Strategies

    David Gruber is an attorney and mediator. Mr. Gruber has managed the Michigan Agricultural Mediation Program since 2010 and the Florida Agricultural Mediation Program since 2017. Before joining RTS, Mr. Gruber served as public information officer for the Michigan Supreme Court and as a senior consultant with Public Sector Consultants, Inc. (PSC), a Lansing public policy research firm.  

     

  • Stress and Dairy Farming: Challenging Times in the Dairy Industry Pave the Way for Mental Health Struggles

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The dairy industry has been struggling with low milk prices, infrastructure problems, trade issues, and isolation for several years. Small family farms have been going out of business faster than any time in recent history and even milk cooperatives that buy milk from the farms have claimed bankruptcy. At the start of 2020, the end of the four-year milk price nightmare was starting to come to an end and producers saw the light at the end of the tunnel to start digging themselves out of. Then COVID-19 hit. This pandemic rocked the system in an unprecedented and unpredicted way. With this comes intense farm stress, despair, and desperation for many. Understanding how the system works – or doesn’t – is important because dairy producers work 24/7/365 to provide our families a safe and nutritious food. The very least we can give them is an attempt to understand and help them when they need it.

    Summary- The dairy industry has been struggling with low milk prices, infrastructure problems, trade issues, and isolation for several years. Small family farms have been going out of business faster than any time in recent history and even milk cooperatives that buy milk from the farms have claimed bankruptcy. At the start of 2020, the end of the four-year milk price nightmare was starting to come to an end and producers saw the light at the end of the tunnel to start digging themselves out of. Then COVID-19 hit. This pandemic rocked the system in an unprecedented and unpredicted way. With this comes intense farm stress, despair, and desperation for many. Understanding how the system works – or doesn’t – is important because dairy producers work 24/7/365 to provide our families a safe and nutritious food. The very least we can give them is an attempt to understand and help them when they need it.

    Intended audience: Dairy producers, those who work with dairy producers (i.e. nurses, bankers, feed salesmen, etc.), and consumer

    Objectives: By the end of this presentation participants will be able to:

    1) Explain how milk gets to the store, including the supply chains associated with the producer, processor, retailer, and consumer

    2) Identify current and past market and industry stressors for dairy producers

    3) Describe the impact of this and other farm stress on a dairy producer’s livelihood and mental health.

     

    Amanda Stone, PhD

    Assistant Professor and Extension Dairy Specialist, Mississippi State University

    Amanda Stone is from Greensburg, Pennsylvania and currently lives in Starkville, Mississippi where she is an Assistant Professor and Extension Dairy Specialist at Mississippi State University.  She received a B.S. in Animal Sciences and Biology from the University of Findlay in 2009.  She then went on to complete her M.S. in 2013 and PhD in 2016 in Animal Sciences at the University of Kentucky.  Her current research interests involve mastitis management, precision dairy monitoring technology application for disease detection, and heat stress abatement techniques. Her current Extension efforts focus on farm stress and mental health of dairy farmers along with finding science-based solutions to help dairy producers reach their goals.

  • Behavioral Health Planning: A Key to Farming in the Era of COVID-19

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    COVID-19 adds new uncertainties to farming on top of a five-year or longer economic recession in most sectors of agriculture. Like climate shifts, tariffs, and disease outbreaks in crops and livestock, COVID-19 is largely beyond the control of agricultural producers. Importantly however, we can mostly control how we behave. Agricultural producers will learn how to develop plans for minimizing infections of the virus, set up arrangements for access to necessary inputs such as equipment and repairs, contracts for a labor force and transportation, and where to become knowledgeable about federal and state assistance programs.

    Summary: COVID-19 adds new uncertainties to farming on top of a five-year or longer economic recession in most sectors of agriculture.  Like climate shifts, tariffs, and disease outbreaks in crops and livestock, COVID-19 is largely beyond the control of agricultural producers.  Importantly however, we can mostly control how we behave.  Agricultural producers will learn how to develop plans for minimizing infections of the virus, set up arrangements for access to necessary inputs such as equipment and repairs, contracts for a labor force and transportation, and where to become knowledgeable about federal and state assistance programs.
    Intended Audience: farmers, ranchers, agricultural workers, and others who serve the agricultural community, including Extension personnel, healthcare workers, and public officials. 
    Learning Objectives:
    • Webinar participants will learn how the behavioral health of agricultural producers differs from the non-farm population, particularly during this era of COVID-19;
    • The participants will learn how to develop behavior coping plans within their families and with employees;
    • The participants will learn about daily behavioral management practices, including sleep, family talking sessions, physical affirmations that produce relaxation and comfort, diet, and maintaining affiliation along with physical distancing;
    • How to build a support network of needed expertise while minimizing exposure to COVID-19. 

    Michael R. Rosmann, Ph.D.

    Psychologist/Farmer, Adjunct Professor, Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Iowa

    Michael Rosmann is a farmer and psychologist at Harlan, Iowa.  He obtained his BA in psychology from the University of Colorado and his MS and PhD degrees in clinical psychology from the University of Utah.  His professional work has contributed to the understanding of why people farm, their behavioral health, and why suicide is unusually common among farmers.  The Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance Network program that is being implemented by the USDA as part of the 2018 Farm Bill is largely based on the work he and colleagues undertook for four decades.  Dr. Rosmann often contributes to national and international media, such as NPR, CNN, the Guardian, The New Republic, Time Magazine, and many farming periodicals about agricultural behavioral health, and now COVID-19.