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Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
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  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    Summary: Caring for both the physical and emotional health of our next generation is crucial. From adapting to changes to feeling overwhelmed, like adults, children also experience stress and anxiety; however, they may be unsure of what they are feeling and how to respond. During this webinar, we will take a closer look at the status of farm youth mental health. We will recognize causes of stress among youth living in farming and rural communities and highlight the resources available to assist families.

    Summary: Caring for both the physical and emotional health of our next generation is crucial. From adapting to changes to feeling overwhelmed, like adults, children also experience stress and anxiety; however, they may be unsure of what they are feeling and how to respond. During this webinar, we will take a closer look at the status of farm youth mental health. We will recognize causes of stress among youth living in farming and rural communities and highlight the resources available to assist families.

    Intended Audience: Extension, practitioners, educators, farming/rural families, etc. 

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to...
    - Describe the status of farm youth's mental health including the prevalence of anxiety and depression. 
    - Recognize common and unique reasons or causes of stress among youth living in farming and rural communities.
    - Identify mental health and wellness resources available to assist farm families and where to locate them.

    Josie Rudolphi, PhD

    Assistant Professor/Extension Specialist

    University of Illinois

    Josie M. Rudolphi, PhD, is an assistant professor and Extension specialist in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Rudolphi’s research quantifies the burden of mental health conditions among agricultural populations, identifies risk and protective factors, and considers socio-ecological interventions. She is the director of the North Central Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance, a 12-state collaborative that increases and expands stress and mental health services to agricultural producers, workers, and their families

    Jana Davidson, M.Ed.

    Program Manager

    Progressive Agriculture Foundation

    As Program Manager, Jana Davidson leads the Foundation’s program team overseeing day-to-day and long-range program operations, while continuing to strengthen the overall reach, impact, and outcomes of the Progressive Agriculture Safety Day® programs. She guides the program staff through ongoing efforts to reach more children, families, and communities throughout North America to best align with the ongoing needs in rural and farming landscapes. Davidson received her Bachelor of Science degree from the Pennsylvania State University in Agribusiness Management and went on to earn a Master of Education specializing in Teaching & Curriculum. Davidson believes in the mission of the PAF Safety Day program in helping provide practical solutions through hands-on education and resources to overcome the problem of preventable injuries and fatalities among youth living, working, and visiting farms. She has been a volunteer with the PAF Safety Day program since 2005 and continues to coordinate a PAF Safety Days in her local community.

  • Contains 5 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/26/2022

    Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farm workers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team and effectively communicating within that team are essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Summary: Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farmworkers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team, and effectively communicating within that team is essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Intended Audience: Supervisor or Managers: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns, and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    • Define zoonotic disease and identify various modes of transmission
    • Identify a minimum of four significant zoonotic diseases affecting the production agricultural population
    • Discuss warning signs and symptoms of major zoonotic diseases which have adverse effects for reproductive health
    • Locate a minimum of three recommended educational resources for use in training an agricultural workforce

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health Program Director, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Public Health Program Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    Summary: Workplace sexual harassment (WSH) in agriculture is a persistent and pervasive problem that threatens employees’ safety and well-being and damages organizational climate and trajectory. Until recently, tailored trainings about WSH and resources specific to the agricultural sector and its audiences were lacking. Over the past several years, researchers and partners with the Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health (PNASH) Center in Washington State have worked with a number of agricultural and industry stakeholders (e.g. farmworkers, growers, government leaders and agencies, legal experts, advocates, etc.), to explore the nature of WSH and to develop relative education, resources, and training. While education alone will not stop WSH, it’s an important strategy in a multi-faceted approach to prevention. In this webinar, participants will be introduced to The Basta! Prevent Sexual Harassment in Agriculture training, toolkit, and video. The Basta! training uses an evidence-based, community engaged approach to help employees, HR staff, and growers prevent and address sexual harassment in the agricultural workplace.

    Summary: 

    Workplace sexual harassment (WSH) in agriculture is a persistent and pervasive problem that threatens employees’  safety and well-being  and damages organizational climate and trajectory. Until recently, tailored trainings about WSH and resources specific to the agricultural sector and its audiences were lacking. Over the past several years, researchers and partners with the Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health (PNASH) Center in Washington State have worked with a number of agricultural and industry stakeholders (e.g. farmworkers, growers, government leaders and agencies, legal experts, advocates, etc.), to explore the nature of WSH and to develop relative education, resources, and training.  While education alone will not stop WSH, it’s an important strategy in a multi-faceted approach to prevention. In this webinar, participants will be introduced to The Basta! Prevent Sexual Harassment in Agriculture training, toolkit, and video. The Basta! training uses an evidence-based, community engaged approach to help employees, HR staff, and growers prevent and address sexual harassment in the agricultural workplace.

    Following the session, the learner will be able to:
    a. Summarize the scope and nature of workplace sexual harassment in agriculture.
    b. Examine multi-level factors that influence sexual harassment in agriculture.
    c. Review employer’s and employees’ rights and responsibilities in reporting and addressing workplace sexual harassment.
    d. Share effective strategies and interventions that can reduce the threat of workplace sexual harassment and strengthen protocols and reporting mechanisms for employee-victims.

    Live interpretation in Spanish will be available for this session.

    Jody Early, Ph.D., M.S., MCHES

    Associate Professor, Faculty Coordinator, Health Education and Promotion Minor, School of Nursing and Health Studies, University of Washington Bothell

    Dr. Jody Early is an Associate Professor of Health Studies and an affiliate faculty in Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies and the Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health Center at the University of Washington Bothell and Seattle campuses. She currently serves as lead faculty for the Health Education and Promotion minor in the School of Nursing and Health Studies and is a former Associate Director of UW Bothell’s Teaching and Learning Center.

     Over the last 25 years, Jody has dedicated her life to improving health equity and higher education. A Master Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES), Jody’s research, teaching and praxis largely explore structural and social ecological factors that impact the health and well-being of individuals and populations, especially among women and Latinx communities. Her work, both in and outside of the academy, has allowed her to collaborate with communities to design, implement, and evaluate, culturally tailored health education interventions and strategies, and to involve her students in the process.

    Dennise Drury, MPH

    Outreach and Education Specialist

    Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health Center (PNASH)

    Dennise Drury is the Outreach and Education Specialist at the Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health Center (PNASH) She has a background in environmental science and a passion for increasing the inclusivity and accessibility of science and research for Latino communities. In her current role, she works in collaboration with researchers, community organizations, and agricultural stakeholders to coordinate the Center's communications and educational activities. She has a passion for developing and evaluating workplace interventions to improve the health and safety of farmworkers. She is currently working on developing an evaluation of the Basta! Prevent Sexual Harassment in Agriculture worksite training and toolkit created in collaboration with the agricultural community.

    Mike Gempler

    Executive Director

    Washington Grower's League

    Mike Gempler is the Executive Director of the Washington Grower’s League. He received a bachelor’s degree in agriculture from Ohio State University and a master’s degree in agricultural economics from the University of Wyoming. Mike is also a graduate of the Washington Agriculture and Forestry Leadership Program and served as a past-president of the National Council of Agricultural Employers (NCAE), based in Washington, DC.

    Alyson Dimmit Gnam

    Attorney

    Northwest Justice Project

    Alyson Dimmitt Gnam is an attorney in the Farmworker Unit at the Northwest Justice Project in Washington State. She represents agricultural employees in sexual harassment claims, as well as discrimination, labor trafficking, and concerted activity cases. She is a member of the steering committee of the sexual harassment peer training project of the BASTA Coalition.

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Summary: Do farmers or ranchers really retire? Generational family operations frequently include the aging parents, the living legends of agriculture. Farmers and ranchers self-identify good health with the ability to work. The normal aging process slows down one’s ability to engage in meaningful activities physically and mentally, essentially to continue working. Swirl in the postmenopausal issues incurred by the female farmer, and a myriad of health hazards arise.

    Summary: Do farmers or ranchers really retire? Generational family operations frequently include the aging parents, the living legends of agriculture. Farmers and ranchers self-identify good health with the ability to work. The normal aging process slows down one’s ability to engage in meaningful activities physically and mentally, essentially to continue working. Swirl in the postmenopausal issues incurred by the female farmer, and a myriad of health hazards arise.

    Unlike men, who experience a gradual loss of bone mass as they age, women will lose over 30% of their bone mass in the first five years after menopause. Agriculture is a hazardous and uncertain profession. Women are working well past the age of menopause. Training measures should focus on avoiding common risk factors and preventative actions to decrease the likelihood of an injury. Workplace and home safety are achievable. We will also address other age-related changes such as vision, hearing, and sleep disturbance. Every member of the family operation will benefit from learning creative strategies and solutions to help the aging in-place seniors achieve wellness and self-fulfillment.

    Linda Emanuel, RN

    Community Health Nurse, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Good health advocacy has been at the heart of Linda’s essence from her formative years as a farm girl in eastern Nebraska. Graduating from Nebraska Methodist School of Nursing in 1985, she worked as an R.N. in a variety of acute care hospital settings for over 30 years. She and her husband Tom raised three sons on a successful row crop operation that has been able to welcome the next generation and their families home to continue to diversify their family business. Linda served as a Fellow in the Nebraska LEAD program and has also received agrimedicine training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Linda now serves on the advisory board for CS-CASH and a member of the AgriSafe team, as a Community Health Nurse.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    Summary: Grain Bin Safety week started in 2014 as an advocacy program to educate farmers and agricultural workers on safe practices in working in and around grain storage facilities. The program works on both sides of the issue by promoting a zero-entry mentality and then working with agribusiness to provide Grain Rescue tubes and training to Fire departments across the country. Since 2014 we have delivered 207 Grain rescue tubes in 31 States and this year will be adding 58 Rescue tubes. Learn about the program and how you could become involved.

    Summary: Grain Bin Safety week started in 2014 as an advocacy program to educate farmers and agricultural workers on safe practices in working in and around grain storage facilities. The program works on both sides of the issue by promoting a zero-entry mentality and then working with agribusiness to provide Grain Rescue tubes and training to Fire departments across the country. Since 2014 we have delivered 207 Grain rescue tubes in 31 States and this year will be adding 58 Rescue tubes. Learn about the program and how you could become involved.

    Jade Rodemeyer

    Farm Sales Manager (Southeast Iowa and Missouri)

    Nationwide Agribusiness

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

    Paul Stevenson

    Senior Risk Management Consultant

    Nationwide Agribusiness

  • Contains 5 Component(s)

    The Confined Space Grain Safety program is intended for workers and managers in agriculture. This includes Coop's, farm operators, employees, and agriculture business owners. The major focus of the program is on safety in confined space work areas.

    The Confined Space Grain Safety program is intended for workers and managers in agriculture. This includes Coop's, farm operators, employees, and agriculture business owners. The major focus of the program is on safety in confined space work areas.
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

    1. Be able to identify hazards associated with confined space work. 
    2. Understand the process for confined space entry and lock out/ tag out procedures. 
    3. Understand monitoring the air quality in a Confined Space. 
    4. Understand the harnesses that need to be worn during an entry 
    5. Understand the job responsibilities of a confined space attendant 
    6. Know where to look for OSHA references and resources related to confined space entry in the grain industry. 

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Contains 3 Component(s)

    Summary: There are many benefits for hiring youth in agriculture, including the development of job skills, increased self-esteem, responsibility, and earned income. However, adolescents and young adults working in agriculture (under 25 years old) are at increased risk for occupational injuries. In addition to traditional workplace hazards, developmental differences (both physical and cognitive), inexperience, fatigue, and distracted behaviors increase the risk of injury. Employers and supervisors play an active role in protecting these workers. Communicating effectively with young workers about health and safety hazards that impact injury risk is key to protecting this population. This webinar will describe specific skills and practices that can be implemented in the workplace, on family farms, and in agricultural classrooms. Intended Audience: Employers, Parents, Educators

    Summary: There are many benefits for hiring youth in agriculture, including the development of job skills, increased self-esteem, responsibility, and earned income. However, adolescents and young adults working in agriculture (under 25 years old) are at increased risk for occupational injuries. In addition to traditional workplace hazards, developmental differences (both physical and cognitive), inexperience, fatigue, and distracted behaviors increase the risk of injury. Employers and supervisors play an active role in protecting these workers. Communicating effectively with young workers about health and safety hazards that impact injury risk is key to protecting this population. This webinar will describe specific skills and practices that can be implemented in the workplace, on family farms, and in agricultural classrooms. Intended Audience: Employers, Parents, Educators

    At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:
    - Identify risk factors that increase injury risk among adolescents and young adults.
    - Recognize the role that supervisors (i.e., employers, parents, educators) play in protecting young workers.
    - Identify resources that can be used to address both traditional and non-traditional workplace hazards.
    - Apply communication skills and workplace practices that can be utilized in the workplace, on the family farm, or in agricultural classrooms.

    Diane Rohlman, PhD

    Director, Agricultural Safety and Health Program , University of Iowa

    University of Iowa and Healthier Workforce Center of the Midwest

    Dr. Rohlman is the Associate Dean for Research in the University of Iowa’s College of Public Health. She is also a professor in the Department of Occupational & Environmental Health where she holds the Endowed Chair in Rural Health and Safety. She is Director of the University of Iowa’s Healthier Workforce Center.  Her research focuses on the health effects of occupational and environmental exposures, with emphasis on the increased workplace risks faced by younger employees. Her studies have examined agricultural workers in the United States and around the world, including research on the effects of pesticide exposure on adolescents and their developing nervous system. She also has studied how lifestyle factors and mental health can impact safety on the job, as well as the effect of interventions directed toward supervisors and workplace policies.  Dr. Rohlman received her masters and doctorate in experimental psychology from Bowling Green State University in Ohio.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    Summary: Heat and wildfire smoke has become a persistent health threat for agriculture workers. This webinar will focus on understanding the risks of exposure to wildfire smoke and heat and potential strategies for protecting agricultural workers. In addition, participants will learn about a unique research partnership utilized to co-develop and communicate safety and health information to agricultural workers.

    Summary: Heat and wildfire smoke has become a persistent health threat for agriculture workers. This webinar will focus on understanding the risks of exposure to wildfire smoke and heat and potential strategies for protecting agricultural workers. In addition, participants will learn about a unique research partnership utilized to co-develop and communicate safety and health information to agricultural workers.  

    Intended Audience: Agricultural farmers, ranchers, supervisors, farmworkers, farmworker organizations, health and safety professionals, trainers, promotores, rural healthcare providers, extension agents, and others who work in agriculture. 

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to...
    • Describe the risk factors for exposure to heat and wildfire smoke to farmworkers.
    • Describe solutions to prevent heat-related illness that can be implemented in agricultural work environments. 
    • List best practices for protecting agricultural workers' health during wildfire conditions. 
    • Learn how partnerships with community-based organizations can help communicate safety and health messages to agricultural communities.

    Live interpretation in Spanish will be available for this session.

    Elizabeth Torres

    Director of Operations & Research Coordinator

    El Proyecto Bienestar (EPB)

    Elizabeth Torres is a public health professional with over twenty years of experience in public health. Her interest has been to work in the low-income and farm worker communities to reduce environmental health disparities and improve health outcomes for her community in the Yakima Valley of Washington State. Ms. Torres’ expertise is in implementing community-driven and community-engaged research and public health practice projects to build a healthy, thriving community. She is a bicultural, bilingual, and a trusted public health messenger in her community. She has a proven record in community-based participatory research projects ranging from indoor air quality and pediatric asthma, occupational exposure and health (such as pesticide exposure, heat-related illness), and COVID-19 (risks, symptoms, preventions strategies, and vaccination).  

       

    For the last twelve years, Ms. Torres has been the Research Coordinator for El Proyecto Bienestar (EPB), a community-based collaborative partnership based in the Yakima Valley, a highly productive agricultural region in WA State. The EPB program links the Yakima Valley Farmworkers Clinic, Northwest Communities Education Center, Heritage University, and the University of Washington Pacific Northwest Agricultural Health and Safety (PNASH) Center, a NIOSH-funded agricultural center. The EPB mission involves identifying, prioritizing, and responding to occupational and environmental issues facing the Hispanic agricultural workers and their families in the Yakima Valley. As the EPB community advisory board coordinator, Ms. Torres facilitates new partnerships and conversations to bring diverse voices to the table. Ms. Torres also serves as the main community liaison between study participants and the broader EPB team, responsible for arranging and facilitating the Community Advisory Board (CAB) meetings.

    John Flunker, PhD, MPH, MS

    Post-Doctoral Scholar

    University of Washington's Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center

    Dr. Flunker is an environmental and occupational epidemiologist specializing in exposure assessment, exposure-outcome modeling, and working with vulnerable populations. In partnership with industry and community stakeholders and through collaborations with multi-disciplinary research teams, he has cataloged factors related to adverse health outcomes and implemented evidence-based workplace interventions among Latino thoroughbred horse farm workers, elucidated the relationship between resource extraction particulate exposures and respiratory health experienced by residents of rural Appalachia Kentucky, and co-led a Maryland casino worker occupational safety research feasibility study designed to explore under-reported industry hazards. His current research examines wildfire smoke, heat stress, and associated safety and health outcomes among agriculture workers and residents. Dr. Flunker is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington's Pacific Northwest Agricultural Health and Safety and Health (PNASH) Center.

  • Contains 3 Component(s)

    Summary: Suicide is a leading cause of death in many communities and impacts hundreds of people. Creating mechanisms to put time and distance between someone struggling with a mental health concern and lethal means is an important part of creating hope and healing.

    Summary: Suicide is a leading cause of death in many communities and impacts hundreds of people. Creating mechanisms to put time and distance between someone struggling with a mental health concern and lethal means is an important part of creating hope and healing.  

    At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to...
    a. Cite the suicide risk and protective factors in rural, ranching, and farming communities
    b. Identify why safe storage protocols matter in suicide safety planning
    c. Describe an overview of the Counseling on Access to Lethal Means approach

    Lisa Sullivan

    Executive Director

    Texas Suicide Prevention Collaborative

    Lisa is the Executive Director of the Texas Suicide Prevention Collaborative, a statewide non-profit dedicated to helping Texas communities be suicide safer. She coordinates a variety of tasks for this vital statewide resource. One initiative is the Texas Suicide Prevention Council, a network of over 140 organizations across the local, regional and statewide levels and specialized work teams for SMVF and higher education institutions.
    Lisa serves as the SMVF Lead for the Council and Collaborative’s work in veteran and military initiatives and works to ensure the Department of Defense Suicide Prevention Plan and the VA Plan for Preventing Veteran Suicide are incorporated into the community programming within the Texas State Suicide Prevention Plan. She is the Texas Suicide Prevention Council liaison for the Texas Governors Challenge and Austin Mayors Challenge Teams and is on the Texas Advancing Suicide Safer Schools Roadmap™ Team.

    Lisa coordinates the Texas Suicide Prevention Symposium, bringing together national, state, and local thought leaders, experts, and advocates to elevate and improve suicide prevention initiatives through community partners, education institutions, mental health providers, military and veteran service providers, and others.

    . Lisa served as a planning contractor with NASA-Johnson Space Center and was formerly a senior associate and futurist with Technology Futures, Inc. She has authored or co-authored more than 20 studies on the future in areas such as: aerospace, information technologies, electronics, pharmaceuticals, telecommunications, energy, consumer values and lifestyles and education and workforce development.
    Lisa holds an undergraduate degree in Business Administration from Elmhurst College and a Master of Science degree in Studies of the Future (Foresight) from the University of Houston-Clear Lake.

  • Contains 3 Component(s)

    Motor vehicle crashes are among the top reasons that workers are injured in agriculture. From an occupational safety and health perspective, rural roadways present unique challenges to stakeholders engaged in crash and injury prevention. This session provides an overview of the key issues relevant to rural roadway safety within the context of agricultural vehicles and logging trucks and proven methods for reducing rural roadway crashes and their severity. In addition, the magnitude of the crash problem and trends will be presented for the Southwest Region (i.e., AR, LA, NM, OK, and TX) using data from the Southwest Agricultural Crash Surveillance System (SW AgCRASH).

    Summary: Motor vehicle crashes are among the top reasons that workers are injured in agriculture. From an occupational safety and health perspective, rural roadways present unique challenges to stakeholders engaged in crash and injury prevention.  This session provides an overview of the key issues relevant to rural roadway safety within the context of agricultural vehicles and logging trucks and proven methods for reducing rural roadway crashes and their severity. In addition, the magnitude of the crash problem and trends will be presented for the Southwest Region (i.e., AR, LA, NM, OK, and TX) using data from the Southwest Agricultural Crash Surveillance System (SW AgCRASH).

    Intended Audience: health and safety professionals, farmers, ranchers, ag workers, healthcare providers, and others interested in rural roadway safety

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to...
    1.   Describe the frequency of crashes involving agricultural vehicles in the Southwest Regional over time.  
    2.   Identify the top factors contributing to roadway crashes involving agricultural vehicles in the Southwest Region.
    3.   Identity potential countermeasures or ways to reduce crashes involving agricultural vehicles or their severity.

    Eva Shipp, MS, PhD

    Senior Research Scientist

    Texas A&M Transportation Institute

    Eva Shipp, PhD, is a Senior Research Scientist at the Texas A&M Transportation Institute where she manages the crash analytics team. She is formally trained in occupational and injury epidemiology. She oversees a variety of projects including those targeting agricultural and commercial motor vehicles and efforts to improve the quality of crash reporting in Texas and other states. Current funders include NIOSH through the Southwest Center for Agricultural Health, Injury Prevention, and Education, the Federal Motor Carrier Association, and the Texas Dept of Transportation. She also serves as the technical advisor to the Texas Traffic Records Coordinating Committee, which is a group of state agencies working to improve traffic safety through linkages between crash records and other data sources.