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  • Rooted in Facts: COVID-19 Vaccines (August 25, 2021)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The coronavirus pandemic has challenged our way of thinking, living and interacting. Get the information you need to make decisions for yourself and your family. This is a discussion addressing common questions about COVID-19 vaccines. Watch the recording of this neighbor-to-neighbor virtual discussion to sort through information concerning the COVID-19 vaccines. This presentation took place on August 25th at noon Central with invited speaker Fred Gerr, MD.

    The coronavirus pandemic has challenged our way of thinking, living and interacting. Get the information you need to make decisions for yourself and your family. This is a discussion addressing common questions about COVID-19 vaccines.  Watch the recording of this neighbor-to-neighbor virtual discussion to sort through information concerning the COVID-19 vaccines. This presentation took place on August 25th at noon Central with invited speaker Fred Gerr, MD.

    Intended Audience: Agricultural Producers & Workers, Individuals living in rural areas, or any individuals that would like to learn more about COVID-19 vaccine confidence

    Fred Gerr, MD

    Dr. Gerr has been practicing occupational medicine and internal medicine for 35 years. He is currently professor emeritus of Occupational and Environmental Health and Epidemiology at the University of Iowa College of Public Health and professor emeritus of Internal Medicine in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Occupational Medicine at the Carver College of Medicine at the University of Iowa. Dr. Gerr has served as program director of the Occupational Medicine Residency Training Program at the Rollins College of Public Health at Emory University and at the University of Iowa. He has provided technical assistance for the prevention of COVID-19 infection to the University of Iowa, the Supreme Court of the State of Iowa, the Theater Arts Program at Coe College, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Dr. Gerr is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Preventive Medicine.

  • Protecting Your Ag Employees from Infectious Disease Including New COVID-19 Delta Variant

    Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and associated coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has profoundly affected humans on a global scale in a noticeably short time. Individuals working in agriculture are essential workers and are naturally at increased risk of negative health and economic consequences from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. This presentation will highlight protective measures ag employers can take to reduce transmission of infectious diseases including the new COVID-19 Delta variant. Interim guidance from the CDC and U.S. Department of Labor, “Agricultural Employer Checklist for Creating a COVID-19 Assessment and Control Plan” will be reviewed throughout the presentation. This presentation will also promote the use of mitigation strategies including COVID-19 vaccines, current evidence-based resources addressing vaccine confidence, and workplace infection control.

    Summary: The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and associated coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has profoundly affected humans on a global scale in a noticeably short time. Individuals working in agriculture are essential workers and are naturally at increased risk of negative health and economic consequences from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. This presentation will highlight protective measures ag employers can take to reduce transmission of infectious diseases including the new COVID-19 Delta variant. Interim guidance from the CDC and U.S. Department of Labor, “Agricultural Employer Checklist for Creating a COVID-19 Assessment and Control Plan” will be reviewed throughout the presentation. This presentation will also promote the use of mitigation strategies including COVID-19 vaccines, current evidence-based resources addressing vaccine confidence, and workplace infection control.

    Intended Audience: Farm/Ranch owners and operators, health and safety professionals, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns, and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the conclusion of the program, participants will be able to…
    1. Gain an understanding of infectious disease control measures to reduce exposure risks, including the new COVID-19 Delta variant, among agricultural workers and employers.
    2. Create an infectious disease assessment and control plan using the recommendations from the CDC and the U.S Department of Labor Agricultural Employer Checklist.
    3. Recognize the efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccine in the prevention of coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infectious disease in the ag workplace.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-99084-SH0 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Natalie Roy, MPH

    AgriSafe Executive Director

    As Executive Director of AgriSafe for over twenty years, Natalie Roy utilizes her public health training to improve the quality of health care offered to farm families. Natalie holds a Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She is pleased to work in the area of agricultural health as it relates to her experience growing up on a farm in Canterbury New Hampshire.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health Program Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Public Health Program Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Tools & Training to Aid in Selection of PPE in Agriculture (July 29, 2021)

    Contains 10 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/29/2021

    Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge. Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education

    Summary:  Workers in the agricultural industry experience multiple hazardous respiratory exposures. It is important to understand these risks and to know the appropriate protective equipment to purchase and use. The female workforce often experiences a challenge finding the right protection with a proper fit. This 30-minute program will address both the risks and the right protective gear.
    Intended audience: The primary audience for this program will be agricultural production workers, including female workers, and agricultural business managers
    Objectives (Focus areas): At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to: 
    • Identify common respiratory exposures that put workers at risk for respiratory illness
    • Recognize appropriate respiratory protection for workers, co-workers, or family members
    • Understand the difference between a respirator and a fabric or paper mask – sorting out the language
    • Access evidence-based information related to respiratory protection

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa. She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training. From 1997 to 2013, she provided agricultural occupational health services and program development for the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety.

  • Prevention of Covid-19 Among the Agricultural Industry – Contact Tracing

    Contains 5 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/28/2021

    The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and associated coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has profoundly affected humans on a global scale in a noticeably short time. Individuals working in agriculture who, as “essential workers", are exempt from stay-home mandates, and are naturally at increased risk of negative health, economic, social, and familial consequences from the on-going COVID-19 pandemic. Language and cultural differences, rural geographies, socioeconomic pressures, and immigration status are among the barriers that impede agricultural workers access to critical education and prevention technologies emerging to combat COVID-19. Additionally, the unusual persistence and multimodal transmission cycle of SARS-CoV-2 emerging from ongoing scientific study may require customization of otherwise standard prevention messaging to agricultural workers to further prevent infection and disease exacerbation.

    Summary: The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and associated coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has profoundly affected humans on a global scale in a noticeably short time. Individuals working in agriculture who, as “essential workers", are exempt from stay-home mandates, and are naturally at increased risk of negative health, economic, social, and familial consequences from the on-going COVID-19 pandemic. Language and cultural differences, rural geographies, socioeconomic pressures, and immigration status are among the barriers that impede agricultural workers access to critical education and prevention technologies emerging to combat COVID-19. Additionally, the unusual persistence and multimodal transmission cycle of SARS-CoV-2 emerging from ongoing scientific study may require customization of otherwise standard prevention messaging to agricultural workers to further prevent infection and disease exacerbation.

    Contact tracing is a tool that can help slow the spread of infectious diseases, such as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Contact tracing helps protect you and your employees by: Letting people know they may have been exposed to COVID-19 and should monitor their health for signs and symptoms of COVID-19. Helping people who may have been exposed to COVID-19 get tested, self-quarantine or isolate to prevent spread of disease (CDC).

    Intended Audience: Farm/Ranch owner and operators, health and safety professionals, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the conclusion of the program, participants will be able to...

    1. Explain the importance of COVID-19 occurrence, distribution and control for agricultural safety. 
    2. Understand how COVID-19 particularly impacts rural areas. 
    3. Identify ways to limit the spread of COVID-19 in an agricultural work environment through contact tracing.
    4. Document at least three evidence based resources on COVID-19 safety in the workplace.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-99084-SH0 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Emma Bergqvist

    Public Health Analyst, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Emma is a second year MPH candidate at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine with a concentration in Epidemiology. She has a Bachelor's degree in Biology, with a minor in Health Policy and Administration. Through her studies she has developed a passion for infectious diseases and public health, both of which she uses in her role as Public Health Analyst at AgriSafe. She critically analyzes emerging health threats that impact the health of agricultural producers. Emma provides data analysis of agricultural health issues, finds practical solutions, and reports statistical and analytical outcomes to stakeholders.

  • Missing the Mark: The Risks of Misdiagnosing Lyme Disease (July 22, 2021)

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Summary: Tick borne illnesses often go undetected for years. Our speakers will provide unique perspectives from clinicians, resource development, and emotional support of those suffering with Lyme disease. The webinar will provide up to date education, understanding of the complex disease presentation, Lyme disease resources and awareness of the long-term effects for physical and mental health. Objectives: By the end of this webinar participants will be able to... - Describe Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases, and their regional variation - Describe symptoms of Lyme disease- early and late stage - Understand the complexities of Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS), persistence, and secondary diseases/damage - Understand the appropriate use of diagnostic tests for Lyme Disease Intended Audience: This course is intended for health and safety professionals, Ag extension professionals, educators, and individuals involved in working and recreation outdoors.

    Summary: Tick borne illnesses often go undetected for years. Our speakers will provide unique perspectives from clinicians, resource development, and emotional support of those suffering with Lyme disease. The webinar will provide up to date education, understanding of the complex disease presentation, Lyme disease resources and awareness of the long-term effects for physical and mental health.

    Objectives: By the end of this webinar participants will be able to...
    - Describe Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases, and their regional variation
    - Describe symptoms of Lyme disease- early and late stage
    - Understand the complexities of Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS), persistence, and secondary diseases/damage
    - Understand the appropriate use of diagnostic tests for Lyme Disease

    Intended Audience: This course is intended for health and safety professionals, Ag extension professionals, educators, and individuals involved in working and recreation outdoors.

    Continuing Education is Available: The Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety offers 0.1 CEU or 1.0 contact hours of participation. This course is eligible for 1.0 CPH Recertification Credits and is sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. The following groups of professionals have been able to use these CEUs in the past; Industrial Hygiene (CIH), Certified Public Health Professional(CPH), Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Nursing (RN, LPN), Social Work (LSW), Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT), Audiology (ABA), and others. Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits.

     

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  • Invest in Your Health: Cover Up! Head to Toe Personal Protective Equipment (July 8, 2021)

    Contains 7 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agriculture is ranked as one of the most dangerous occupations and involves workers and family members of all ages. Illness and injuries can be prevented if we use the right protective equipment for the job. This program will present an overview of common exposures in farming and ranching and identify appropriate personal protective equipment.

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agriculture is ranked as one of the most dangerous occupations and involves workers and family members of all ages. Illness and injuries can be prevented if we use the right protective equipment for the job. This program will present an overview of common exposures in farming and ranching and identify appropriate personal protective equipment.
    At the conclusion of the program, participants/educators will be able to: 
    1. Review several of the indicators related to use of personal protective equipment (PPE) in agriculture 
    2. Access personal protective (PPE) educational material developed for classroom use
    3. Select decision making activities from programs designed for classroom time frames
    4. Identify safety and health resources for use in educational settings

    Invest in Your Health is supported by:

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    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa. She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training. From 1997 to 2013, she provided agricultural occupational health services and program development for the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety.

  • Respiratory Protection Program Overview in COVID-19 and Beyond (June 30, 2021)- Presentation Slides

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This is the presentation slides for the webinar Respiratory Protection Program Overview in COVID-19 and Beyond (June 30, 2021), the recording of this webinar is not available.

    This is the presentation slides for the webinar Respiratory Protection Program Overview in COVID-19 and Beyond (June 30, 2021), the recording of this webinar is not available. 

    Summary: Many COVID-19 related US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) citations have been issued for missing key elements of a respiratory protection program. This session will cover the requirements of OSHA’s respiratory protection program, 29 CFR 1910.134, with emphasis on key areas noted in the COVID-19 citations and related temporary enforcement guidance; the differences between respirators types, surgical masks and face coverings; and optimizing respirator use during shortages.

    Intended Audience: Agriculture, food and beverage safety and health professionals

  • Wildfire Health Threats: Risk Factors for Farmers and Ranchers (June 17, 2021)

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    Summary: Wildfires have become a persistent health threat for people working in agriculture. This webinar will focus on understanding the risks of exposure to wildfire smoke and potential strategies for responding to protect human health. Best practices for protecting worker health will be shared based on California's requirements along with resources for talking with agricultural workers about wildfire exposure risks. Intended Audience: farmers, ranchers, agricultural producers, agricultural workers, employers, agricultural safety and health professions, health professionals Objectives: By the end of this webinar, attendees will be able to… - Establish key concerns surrounding agricultural workers and exposure to wildfire smoke - Identify existing information gaps and propose potential solutions - Present preliminary efforts to develop a response framework targeted to farmers and ranchers - List best practices for protecting worker health during wildfire conditions - Identify at least one resource for sharing with ag workers related to wildfires

    Summary: Wildfires have become a persistent health threat for people working in agriculture. This webinar will focus on understanding the risks of exposure to wildfire smoke and potential strategies for responding to protect human health. Best practices for protecting worker health will be shared based on California's requirements along with resources for talking with agricultural workers about wildfire exposure risks.

    Intended Audience: farmers, ranchers, agricultural producers, agricultural workers, employers, agricultural safety and health professions, health professionals

    Objectives: By the end of this webinar, attendees will be able to…  

    - Establish key concerns surrounding agricultural workers and exposure to wildfire smoke  

    - Identify existing information gaps and propose potential solutions  

    - Present preliminary efforts to develop a response framework targeted to farmers and ranchers  

    - List best practices for protecting worker health during wildfire conditions  

    - Identify at least one resource for sharing with ag workers related to wildfires

    Teresa Andrews, MS

    Education and Outreach Specialist, Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, University of California Davis

    Ms. Andrews has extensive experience working with cultural minorities, including developing educational materials and conducting training. She collaborated with the Division for the Application of Research Discoveries, NHLBI in the development of culturally sensitive materials on nutrition and physical activity to be used by community health workers to help people build skills to make practical, lasting changes to help fight disease.  In her current role as outreach and educational specialist for the Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, Ms. Andrews has forged collaborative links with Hispanic farm worker groups, growers, farm labor contractors, community organizations, employers, and insurance personnel. She has developed low-literacy educational materials and conducted training sessions in both English and Spanish for farm worker children, dairy workers, farmers, and others.

    Elena Austin, MS, ScD

    Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington

    Dr. Austin received her Doctor of Science in Environmental Health from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, with concentrations in Exposure Assessment and Biostatistics. Her expertise areas and past work include multi-pollutant exposure metrics, geographic information systems, remote sensing, risk communication in farm-worker communities and the development and evaluation of data visualization tools. A number of her projects leverage novel applications of emerging technologies to improve worker health and safety, particularly in WA State agricultural workers and their families. In her ongoing work, she aims to develop methods to jointly investigate exposures to mixtures of pollutants on human health, deploy low-cost methods to assess environmental exposures and implement novel intervention studies with the goal of improving community and worker health, with a particular focus on under-studied populations.

    Edward Kasner, MPH, PhD,

    ClinicalAssistant Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington

    Dr. Kasner is an exposure scientist with a focus on leveraging the tools of precision agriculture to prevent injury and illness among workers. He participates in strategic planning and partnership engagement for the agriculture, forestry, and fishing industries in his role as Outreach Director at the Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health (PNASH) Center. He has conducted pesticide exposure assessments for farmers in Southwest China, led pesticide-related occupational epidemiology studies at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and participated in Washington and Oregon state initiatives addressing pesticide application safety. He also contributes to projects about wildfire smoke and COVID-19, with a particular emphasis on data for agricultural health indicators, practical solutions, and reproducible research.

  • Using Naloxone to Reverse Opioid Overdose in the Agricultural Workplace: Information for Employers and Workers (Continuing Education: Multiple Disciplines)

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In 2018, the U.S. Surgeon General called for increased awareness and availability of naloxone, the opioid antagonist, to reverse the effects of opioid overdose. Despite the rise in the dispensing of naloxone, there is a significant gap in our response across all sectors of society. In the rural parts of our country, where emergency response times can be dangerously long, developing a workplace naloxone availability and use program could ultimately save lives. This webinar will share information from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to help employers and workers understand the risk of opioid overdose and the role of naloxone.

    In 2018, the U.S. Surgeon General called for increased awareness and availability of naloxone, the opioid antagonist, to reverse the effects of opioid overdose. Despite the rise in the dispensing of naloxone, there is a significant gap in our response across all sectors of society. In the rural parts of our country, where emergency response times can be dangerously long, developing a workplace naloxone availability and use program could ultimately save lives. This webinar will share information from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to help employers and workers understand the risk of opioid overdose and the role of naloxone. 
    By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: 
    1. Discuss what medications are prescription and illicit opioids and what is OUD (Opioid Use Disorder) 
    2. Describe the dangers of opioids in the workplace and OUD for safety-sensitive occupations 
    3. Discuss the role of naloxone in opioid overdose 
    4. Discuss the implementation of workplace naloxone use programs 
    5. Understand the administration of the dosage forms available for naloxone used in an emergency
    Sponsored by:
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    This project was supported by the FY17 USDA NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant # 2017-46100-27225 and the FY18 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants (ROTA) # TI-18-022

    Continuing Education:

    The Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety offers 0.1 CEU or 1.0 contact hours of participation. This course is eligible for 1.0 CPH Recertification Credits and is sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. The following groups of professionals have been able to use these CEUs in the past; Industrial Hygiene (CIH), Certified Public Health Professional(CPH), Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Nursing (RN, LPN), Social Work (LSW), Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT), Audiology (ABA), and others.  Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits.

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    For more information on courses and continuing education, please visit- https://learning.agrisafe.org/opioid-misuse-prevention

    Heather Lyons-Burney, Pharm.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, UMKC School of Pharmacy at MSU

    Dr. Heather Lyons-Burney serves as a Clinical Assistant Professor for the UMKC School of Pharmacy’s satellite site at MSU in Springfield, Missouri. A PharmD graduate of UMKC School of Pharmacy, she completed a PGY1 residency with Cox Health Systems in Springfield. Throughout her career she has promoted the profession of pharmacy and has encouraged the development of team-based patient-centered care and innovative services in the community practice setting, as well as the importance of community engagement.. Locally, Heather serves on the clinic’s Board, as well as co-Chairs both the Taney and Greene county coalitions focused on prevention of substance misuse – receiving the Generation Rx Champions Award in 2012, and a Southwest Missouri Jefferson Award in 2018.  In November 2018, she received the ACT Missouri’s Champion of Change for Prevention statewide award for her continuous prevention efforts.  

  • Invest in Your Health: Cultivating a Healthy Mind (May 26, 2021)

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Stigma exists across all age groups for those struggling with mental health. Navigation of the teen years in everyday situations can create angst and uncomfortable feelings that are difficult to express. Adding mental illness and mental crisis to a teen or young adult’s typical growth and development makes struggling with emotions, relationships, academic success, and safety more challenging. According to the CDC, rates of depression and anxiety climb significantly during the ages of 12-17. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youths in the United States. This module opens an introductory discussion of mental health among teens and young adults with guidance from an adult educator. Focus is placed on decreasing stigma, improving mental health literacy, and positive coping skills for teens and young adults. The module showcases a high school agricultural student’s understanding of the agricultural mental health crisis, helping to frame mental health distress to academic and future career success.

    Summary: Stigma exists across all age groups for those struggling with mental health. Navigation of the teen years in everyday situations can create angst and uncomfortable feelings that are difficult to express. Adding mental illness and mental crisis to a teen or young adult’s typical growth and development makes struggling with emotions, relationships, academic success, and safety more challenging. According to the CDC, rates of depression and anxiety climb significantly during the ages of 12-17. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youths in the United States. This module opens an introductory discussion of mental health among teens and young adults with guidance from an adult educator. Focus is placed on decreasing stigma, improving mental health literacy, and positive coping skills for teens and young adults. The module showcases a high school agricultural student’s understanding of the agricultural mental health crisis, helping to frame mental health distress to academic and future career success. 

     Objectives: After the module, teens and young adults will be able to....

    1. Understand the relationship of mental health to physical health and academic or career success 
    2. Recognize basic signs or symptoms that present when young adults experience mental stress 
    3. Identify healthy and unhealthy coping behaviors when faced with mental distress 
    4. Communicate their concerns when suspecting they or someone they know is experiencing a mental health crisis 

    Intended Audience: This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults.



    Invest in Your Health is supported by:

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    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.