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  • Safety Sensitivity of Opioid Use in High Hazardous Industries Such as Agriculture

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine released recommendations for opioid prescribing based on safety-sensitive occupations. Safety-sensitive work is typically classified as operating motor vehicles, modes of transportation, other heavy machinery, or tasks requiring high levels of cognitive function or judgment. Farm duties frequently demand the use of heavy machinery, and concurrent use of narcotics alongside safety-sensitive work can be dangerous. This training educates healthcare providers on how to assess occupational agricultural risks and corresponding patient guidance for those who are taking opioid medications.

    The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine released recommendations for opioid prescribing based on safety-sensitive occupations. Safety-sensitive work is typically classified as operating motor vehicles, modes of transportation, other heavy machinery, or tasks requiring high levels of cognitive function or judgment. Farm duties frequently demand the use of heavy machinery, and concurrent use of narcotics alongside safety-sensitive work can be dangerous. This training educates healthcare providers on how to assess occupational agricultural risks and corresponding patient guidance for those who are taking opioid medications.
    By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: 
    1. Identify what classifies as a safety-sensitive occupation and why
    2. Describe the dangers involved with prescription opioid use and safety-sensitive occupations
    3. Understand how best to discuss with patients who have safety-sensitive occupations alternatives to prescription opioids
    4. Identify best practices for naloxone prescribing and use in a rural or agricultural setting
    5. Discuss implications of medication assisted therapies for Opioid Use Disorder in safety-sensitive occupations

    Sponsored by:

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    This project was supported by the FY17 USDA NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant # 2017-46100-27225 and the FY18 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants (ROTA) # TI-18-022

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

    Heather Lyons-Burney, Pharm.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, UMKC School of Pharmacy at MSU

    Dr. Heather Lyons-Burney serves as a Clinical Assistant Professor for the UMKC School of Pharmacy’s satellite site at MSU in Springfield, Missouri. A PharmD graduate of UMKC School of Pharmacy, she completed a PGY1 residency with Cox Health Systems in Springfield. Throughout her career she has promoted the profession of pharmacy and has encouraged the development of team-based patient-centered care and innovative services in the community practice setting, as well as the importance of community engagement.. Locally, Heather serves on the clinic’s Board, as well as co-Chairs both the Taney and Greene county coalitions focused on prevention of substance misuse – receiving the Generation Rx Champions Award in 2012, and a Southwest Missouri Jefferson Award in 2018.  In November 2018, she received the ACT Missouri’s Champion of Change for Prevention statewide award for her continuous prevention efforts.  

    Ann Marie Butler Kemp, MD

    Professor and Associate Director Family Medicine Residency Program, Associate Professor Clinical Pharmacy, USCIS Civil Surgeon, University of Mississippi Medical Center

    Dr. Kemp currently serves as Professor and Associate Director Residency Program UMMC Family Medicine Department at UMMC. She is also has a faculty appointment with University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy as an Associate Professor Clinical Pharmacy Practice. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Family Physicians and an USCIS Civil Surgeon. She also serves as Chair of the UMMC Opioid Task Force.

  • Exploring the Invest in Your Health Trainer Exchange

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    AgriSafe is committed to training safety and health professionals who wish to teach Invest in Your Health trainings in their classroom. Under our open share platform, once certified, you are free to use the training materials. This webinar discusses what the IYH program is and why this training is so valuable for health professionals.

    AgriSafe is committed to train safety and health professionals who wish to teach IYH trainings in their classroom. Under our open share platform, once certified, you are free to use the training materials.  Our end goal is to build the capacity of rural educators and leaders to train young workers.  
    Invest in Your Health (IYH) consists of five training modules crafted for the agriculture teacher and community leader to seamlessly integrate in their course offerings.  IYH training modules aim to educate, prevent and protect young farmers by providing them with the tools they need to stay safe and healthy.
    The training topics that will be discussed included:
    1. Say What? Protecting your Hearing
    2. Cover Up! Head to Toe Personal Protective Equipment
    3. Stay Cool! Prevention of Heat Related Illness
    4. Stop Zoonosis it its Tracks- Prevention of Zoonosis
    5. Where Y’at-Using Mapping to Define Hazards in Agriculture

    Natalie Roy, MPH

    AgriSafe Executive Director

    As Executive Director of AgriSafe for over sixteen years, Natalie Roy utilizes her public health training to improve the quality of health care offered to farm families. Natalie holds a Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She is pleased to work in the area of agricultural health as it relates to her experience growing up on a farm in Canterbury New Hampshire.

  • A Research Update from the Agricultural Health Study: Recent Findings, Current Work, and Future Plans

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    It has been over 25 years since participants first enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) cohort; in 1993-97, a total of 89,655 individuals joined the study, including 52,394 private pesticide applicators (mostly farmers) and 32,345 of their spouses from North Carolina and Iowa, and 4,916 commercial applicators from Iowa. The cohort has been followed through 3 surveys (1999-2003, 2005-2010, and 2012-2015) and regular linkages to databases to assess both cancer and non-cancer health outcomes, such as respiratory, autoimmune, endocrine, and neurological diseases. Participants provided detailed data on pesticide use and other agricultural exposures at enrollment and in the first two follow-up surveys, and numerous research papers have investigated potential disease associations. Many participants have also contributed to special studies, including recent projects on Lung Health, Biomarkers of Exposure and Effect, and Memory and Aging. This presentation will highlight a selection of recent findings from the AHS (i.e., in the past 5 years), including a focus on non-cancer outcomes as well as recent cancer and mortality findings, and will describe current and future research priorities.

    It has been over 25 years since participants first enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) cohort; in 1993-97, a total of 89,655 individuals joined the study, including 52,394 private pesticide applicators (mostly farmers) and 32,345 of their spouses from North Carolina and Iowa, and 4,916 commercial applicators from Iowa. The cohort has been followed through 3 surveys (1999-2003, 2005-2010, and 2012-2015) and regular linkages to databases to assess both cancer and non-cancer health outcomes, such as respiratory, autoimmune, endocrine, and neurological diseases. Participants provided detailed data on pesticide use and other agricultural exposures at enrollment and in the first two follow-up surveys, and numerous research papers have investigated potential disease associations. Many participants have also contributed to special studies, including recent projects on Lung Health, Biomarkers of Exposure and Effect, and Memory and Aging. This presentation will highlight a selection of recent findings from the AHS (i.e., in the past 5 years), including a focus on non-cancer outcomes as well as recent cancer and mortality findings, and will describe current and future research priorities.
    At the end of this webinar participants will be able to:
    1.  An overview of the study design and the assessment of exposures and health outcomes
    2. Scope of research and selected findings on non-cancer health outcomes
    3. Highlights of recent mortality and cancer findings
    4. Description of current and future research priorities


    Christine G. Parks, Ph.D.

    Staff Scientist and a Principal Investigator on the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

    Dr. Parks has Ph.D. in Epidemiology and has worked at the NIEHS and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, with a primary research focus on risk factors for autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases, as well as women’s health, stress, and aging. In the AHS, she studies pesticides and other agricultural risk factors for systemic autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. She is also overseeing the 4th follow-up survey and assessment of non-cancer outcomes in the cohort and supports other AHS researchers on a variety of topics, such as thyroid disorders and neurological disease.

  • Proactive and Reactive Society: Focus on rural mental health

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/14/2019

    Rural healthcare providers and safety professionals have an important role to play in supporting people experiencing stress or mental health challenges. Come listen as Ted Matthews talks about what we can do to be proactive and prepare ahead of crisis.

    Stress and anxiety over things we have no control over can overwhelm us to the point where we have no energy left to focus on the things we do have control over. Being 5% healthier may not seem like much of an improvement however, it's still better than the alternative which is no improvement. That often times turns into a worse-case scenario. Ted will emphasize simple tools to help break the stagnant cycle and how to strengthen family bonds during times of crisis. 

    Rural healthcare providers and safety professionals have an important role to play in supporting people experiencing stress or mental health challenges. Come listen as Ted Matthews talks about what we can do to be proactive and prepare ahead of crisis. Ted understands the demands farmers face because he counsels farmers in a plethora of areas from crisis intervention to helping farmers relate to their families and workers to better utilize their resources.  If you’re a rural health professional looking to integrate mental health counseling in your care, take time to listen to Ted’s experiences.  He will help you rethink your approach to providing mental health support.  

    This webinar is supported in part by:

    Federal Office of Rural Health Policy

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    Ted Matthews

    Director, MN Rural Mental Health

    Ted Matthews is a mental health practitioner with over 30 years of experience in counseling in rural areas. His focus for the past 2 decades has been farmer mental health support. He has been the director of mental health services during 5 natural disasters. Matthews provides outreach training and public speaking related to farm stressors, nation wide. He also has extensive counseling experience in the areas of PTSD, crisis intervention, family issues, suicidology and domestic abuse.  Featured on the Huffington Post, MPRNews, CNN, NPR, AgriNews, Successful Farming, Prairie Farmer and many others, Ted offers his expertise to help the general population to better understand the farming culture.

  • Assessing Risks in the Misuse of Opioids Among Agricultural Workers – A Guide for Rural Clinicians

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Prescription opioids are often the first-line therapy to treat chronic and acute pain among farmers. Prescribing opioids to farmer populations that may not seek regular treatment or have access to alternative therapies increases the risk for potential opioid misuse. Properly assessing for these characteristics among other abuse or addiction risk factors, is critical in providing treatment that is both appropriate and effective. The training module will seek to provide insight on misuse risk factors among farmers to better inform healthcare providers on warning signs in this specific cohort.

    Prescription opioids are often the first-line therapy to treat chronic and acute pain among farmers. Prescribing opioids to farmer populations that may not seek regular treatment or have access to alternative therapies increases the risk for potential opioid misuse. Properly assessing for these characteristics among other abuse or addiction risk factors, is critical in providing treatment that is both appropriate and effective. The training module will seek to provide insight on misuse risk factors among farmers to better inform healthcare providers on warning signs in this specific cohort.
    By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: 
    1. List potential risk factors for opioid misuse among farmers.
    2. Understand proper opioid misuse assessment strategies.
    3. Identify effective alternatives for treating chronic and acute pain among farmers

    Sponsored by:

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    This project was supported by the FY17 USDA NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant # 2017-46100-27225 and the FY18 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants (ROTA) # TI-18-022

    Dr. Ali Hartman, DPT

    Consulting PT, CF-L1, Pro-Activity North Carolina

    Clinically trained as a Doctor of Physical Therapy, Ali harbors a deep appreciation for the human body and the resilience it holds. Unlike traditional rehabilitation professionals, Ali spends the majority of her time outside of the clinic walls, embedding herself within working populations to maximize the health, well-being, and performance of groups and individuals while leveraging her unique experience in workplace prevention and health promotion.

    She has completed advanced certifications in Applied Prevention and Health Promotion Therapies, and residency at Pro-Activity, a human achievement company that has specialized in workplace prevention and health promotion with industrialized workforces for the past 20 years. Ali was recently named managing partner of Pro-Activity’s North Carolina field office.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Talking to Farmers About Their Pain

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The occupational hazards that farmers face put them at greater risk for acute and chronic pain as a result of ergonomic repetition, accident, or surgical procedure. Addressing specific occupational sources of pain and what activities the pain inhibits are crucial to improving treatment. This module will focus on how to transform the conversation between provider and patient to improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction.

    The occupational hazards that farmers face put them at greater risk for acute and chronic pain as a result of ergonomic repetition, accident, or surgical procedure. Addressing specific occupational sources of pain and what activities the pain inhibits are crucial to improving treatment. This module will focus on how to transform the conversation between provider and patient to improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction.
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1.  Understand the prevalence of occupational hazards amongst farming occupations.
    2.  Recognize occupational implications as they relate to acute and chronic pain.
    3.  Gain strategies to improve provider-patient conversations about occupational farmer pain.
    4.  Identify patient resources to aid in facilitating candid discussion about pain.
    Sponsored by:

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    This project was supported by the FY17 USDA NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant # 2017-46100-27225 and the FY18 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants (ROTA) # TI-18-022

    Alison Hartman, DPT, CF-L1

    Consulting PT, DPT, CF-L1 Pro-Activity North Carolina

    Clinically trained as a Doctor of Physical Therapy, Ali harbors a deep appreciation for the human body and the resilience it holds. Unlike traditional rehabilitation professionals, Ali spends the majority of her time outside of the clinic walls, embedding herself within working populations to maximize the health, well-being, and performance of groups and individuals while leveraging her unique experience in workplace prevention and health promotion. She has completed advanced certifications in Applied Prevention and Health Promotion Therapies, and residency at Pro-Activity, a human achievement company that has specialized in workplace prevention and health promotion with industrialized workforces for the pasts 20 years. Ali was recently named managing partner of Pro-Activity’s North Carolina field office. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association’s and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Tackling Tough Clinical Conversations

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Many healthcare providers report that addressing behavioral health and substance use issues are one of the most challenging areas of their practice. Providers are unsure how to address these issues and yet they are in a prime position to reduce the negative outcomes related to behavioral health problems. This is especially true in rural areas where agricultural workers are found to have higher rates of suicide, depression, and substance use. This webinar will focus on how healthcare providers can start the conversations necessary to identify and treat behavioral health problems.

    Many healthcare providers report that addressing behavioral health and substance use issues are of the most challenging areas of their practice.  Providers are unsure how to address these issues and yet they are in a prime position to reduce the negative outcomes related behavioral health problems.  This is especially true in rural areas where agricultural workers are found to have higher rates of suicide, depression, and substance use.  This webinar will focus on how healthcare providers can start the conversations necessary to identify and treat behavioral health problems. 
    Objectives:
    1. Participants will be able to identify the barriers to having productive clinical conversations regarding behavioral health. 
    2. Participants will be able to describe the Five Principles of Motivational Interviewing.
    3. Participants will apply motivational interviewing principles to a clinical case.


    Webinar made possible through the generous support of: 

    Federal Office of Rural Health Policy

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    Christine Chasek, LIMHP, LADC, LPC

    Associate Professor, Department of Counseling and School Psychology, Director of BHECN , University of Nebraska at Kearney

    Christine Chasek is an Associate Professor at the University of Nebraska Kearney and Director of the Behavioral Healthcare Center of Nebraska-Kearney.  She has strong rural roots and teaches many behavioral health classes in a Midwestern rural University.  Dr. Chasek has more than 20 years of experience practicing mental health and drug and alcohol counseling as a Licensed Independent Mental Health Practitioner and a Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor in rural areas.  Dr. Chasek also serves on the Nebraska Alcohol and Drug Licensing Board and is President of the International Association of Addiction and Offender Counselors.    

  • Hazard Communications Standards (OnDemand)

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    This Hazard Communication Standard training program is intended for female workers and managers in the agricultural industry. This includes dairy farms and small farms that hire at-risk populations. The major focus of the program is on the identification of and the safe usage of chemicals and pesticides, along with respiratory protection.

    This Hazard Communication Standard training program is intended for female workers and managers in the agricultural industry. This includes dairy farms and small farms that hire at-risk populations. The major focus of the program is on the identification of and the safe usage of chemicals and pesticides, along with respiratory protection.
    At the conclusion of the training, participants will be able to: 
    1. Describe the purpose of OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HCS)
    2. Explain the basic requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard
    3. Differentiate between physical and health hazards of agricultural chemicals
    4. Recall the requirements of a written hazard communication program
    5. List the components of a hazard communication training program
    6. Interpret the information contained in Safety Data Sheets (SDS)
    7. Describe the requirements and purpose of hazard warning labels.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Integration of Behavioral Health within Agricultural Health Care

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Twenty percent of any population has mental health complications, including farmers and ranchers. Stigma and privacy concerns associated with mental health issues may mean that many people may not seek out available mental health services. This material was produced under grant # (SH – 26280 - SH4) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Twenty percent of any population has mental health complications, including farmers and ranchers. Stigma and privacy concerns associated with mental health issues may mean that many people may not seek out available mental health services. This material was produced under grant # (SH – 26280 - SH4) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
    At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify a minimum of three common stressors prevalent among agricultural producers  
    2. Describe at least four signs and symptoms of depression and anxiety  
    3. Describe population based and individual based behavioral health interventions  
    4. Locate professionals and current resources in the field of agricultural behavioral health

    This material was produced under grant # (SH – 26280 - SH4) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Establishing a Low-Cost Surveillance System for Agricultural and Logging Injury in the Northeast

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Agriculture and logging are dangerous industries, and though data on fatal injury exists, less is known about non-fatal injury. While past research has informed public health professionals of injury patterns in these industries, a challenge is that these data become dated, and no ongoing systems are able to provide stable estimates of non-fatal injuries over time. NEC researchers established a low-cost, passive surveillance system that has the potential to capture data over a long period.

    Agriculture and logging are dangerous industries, and though data on fatal injury exists, less is known about non-fatal injury. While past research has informed public health professionals of injury patterns in these industries, a challenge is that these data become dated, and no ongoing systems are able to provide stable estimates of non-fatal injuries over time. NEC researchers established a low-cost, passive surveillance system that has the potential to capture data over a long period.
    Upon completion of this program, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify the challenges surrounding injury surveillance in the agriculture and forestry sectors.
    2. Explain the benefits and limitations of using administrative data for injury surveillance.
    3. Describe the most frequent causes of agricultural and logging injury in the Northeast.

    Erika Scott, MS, PhD

    Junior Research Investigator, Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing ​​

    Erika Scott is a researcher with the Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing where she specializes in injury surveillance. Other interests include agricultural and logging safety, health promotion in rural populations, and industrial hygiene. She holds a master's degree in environmental and occupational health with a focus in industrial hygiene from the University of Albany School of Public Health.