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  • Risk Factors for Agricultural Injury

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    This webinar will explain and examine risk factors for agricultural injury. According to the World Health Organization, a risk factor is any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. The agricultural industry poses many risk factors on an individual's health. Knowledge about risk factor prevention is extremely important in the prevention of injuries and illnesses within the agricultural community.

    This webinar will explain and examine risk factors for agricultural injury. According to the World Health Organization, a risk factor is any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. The agricultural industry poses many risk factors on an individual's health. Knowledge about risk factor prevention is extremely important in the prevention of injuries and illnesses within the agricultural community.
    At the close of the session, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify a 'risk factor'
    2. Understand how risk factors are identified in research studies
    3. Differentiate between modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors
    4. Describe risk factors for agricultural injury
    5. Use knowledge of risk factors for prevention 

    Risto Rautiainen, MS, PhD

    Director, Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health (CS-CASH) Department of Environmental, Agricultural & Occupational Health, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center

    Dr. Rautiainen's educational background includes an MS in agriculture and PhD in Occupational and Environmental Health. He previously served as Safety Agronomist and Head of the Occupational Safety Department of the Finnish Farmers' Social Insurance Institution. He later joined The University of Iowa, Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health (GPCAH) as Center Coordinator, Associate Director for Outreach and as Deputy Director. Since 2009, he has worked at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He currently directs the Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health (CS-CASH) and chairs the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) Surveillance working group for Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing. His research interests include injury surveillance, prevention, education, outreach, and evaluation. 

  • Agritourism: The Next Frontier in Agriculture

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Agritourism can be a great way to add supplemental income to your farm but it does come with an additional set of responsibilities. If you are currently running an agritourism operation or are thinking about making this an addition to your farm, you should become familiar with the Compendium of Measures to Prevent Disease Associated with Animals in Public Settings. Following the guidelines outlined in the Compendium will help you make your farm as safe as possible for visitors and protect your assets.

    Agritourism can be a great way to add supplemental income to your farm but it does come with an additional set of responsibilities. If you are currently running an agritourism operation or are thinking about making this an addition to your farm, you should become familiar with the Compendium of Measures to Prevent Disease Associated with Animals in Public Settings. Following the guidelines outlined in the Compendium will help you make your farm as safe as possible for visitors and protect your assets.
    At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:
    1. Understand what zoonotic diseases are, how they are transmitted, and why they are a potential problem for your farm
    2. Be aware of the national best practices outlined in the Compendium and available resources to help you follow these guidelines
    3. Apply these best practices to your farm in order to reduce the risk of illness or injury to visitors
    4. Understand that the risk will never be zero

    Carrie Klumb, MPH

    Epidemiologist, Minnesota Department of Health

    Carrie is an epidemiologist in the Zoonotic Diseases Unit at the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) and is the project coordinator for MDH's project associated with the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center (UMASH) at the University of Minnesota. This project focuses on surveillance of zoonotic diseases in agricultural workers, their families, and others exposed to agricultural settings. She also plans annual Healthy Fairs Workshops and Agritourism Workshops for those involved in county fairs and agritourism. She received her MPH from the University of Minnesota in Environmental Health.

  • Don't Get Stuck! Preventing Needle Stick Injuries in Agricultural Settings

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Needlestick injuries in agriculture are common although not as recognized as those in human clinical settings. Farmers, ranchers, veterinarians, and on-site workers are susceptible to needlesticks on the job. These injuries can be serious and may require medical attention.

    Needlestick injuries in agriculture are common although not as recognized as those in human clinical settings. Farmers, ranchers, veterinarians, and on-site workers are susceptible to needlesticks on the job. These injuries can be serious and may require medical attention.
    At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:
    1. Be aware of the type of products that livestock producers and veterinarians are exposed to.
    2. Recognize the epidemiologic features associated with needlestick related injuries
    3. Use and apply preventive practices to reduce needlestick related injuries.

    Jeff Bender, DVM, MS DACVPM

    Dr. Bender is a professor in both Veterinary Public Health and the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota. He is also a Hospital Epidemiologist with the Veterinary Medical Center at the U of MN and the Co-Director of the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center.

    Dr. Bender's research interests include zoonoses and emerging diseases, food safety, antimicrobial resistance, infectious disease surveillance, and infection prevention and control. 

  • New Immigrants in the Midwest and Agricultural Health Implications

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The Midwest is changing rapidly due to globalization, human migration, and new economic patterns. Immigrants and refugees are among the fastest-growing populations in this region of the United States, with a significant number employed in farming, meatpacking, and related agricultural industries. This webinar describes these new demographic patterns, discusses their implications from a public health standpoint, and provides general strategies for professionals working with immigrant and refugee employees in the agricultural jobs.

    The Midwest is changing rapidly due to globalization, human migration, and new economic patterns. Immigrants and refugees are among the fastest growing populations in this region of the United States, with a significant number employed in farming, meatpacking, and related agricultural industries. This webinar describes these new demographic patterns, discusses their implications from a public health standpoint, and provides general strategies for professionals working with immigrant and refugee employees in the agricultural jobs.
    By the end of this webinar participants will be able to:
    1. To understand the changing demographics of the Midwest; 
    2. To analyze the implications of these demographic changes for the health of agricultural workers; and
    3. To gain strategies for working effectively in the public health field with immigrant and refugee agricultural workers 

    Michele Devlin, DrPH

    Division Chair & Professor, Health Promotion and Education & Director, Iowa Center on Health Disparities - University of Northern Iowa

    Dr. Michele Devlin is Professor of Global Public Health and Chair of the Division of Health Promotion and Education at the University of Northern Iowa. She also founded the Iowa Center on Health Disparities, a model organization established by the National Institutes of Health to improve health equity for underserved populations, and is Director of the UNI Global Health Corps humanitarian relief organization.  Dr. Devlin is also Adjunct Research Professor with the United States Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.  She completed her doctorate degree in international public health at the University of California at Los Angeles.  Her primary areas of specialty include human migration, maternal and child health, and disaster response with refugee and minority populations. 

    Mark Grey, PhD

    Professor of Anthropology and Director, The Iowa Center for Immigrant Leadership and Integration - University of Northern Iowa

    Mark Grey is associate professor if anthropology at the University of Northern Iowa. He received his PhD in applied anthropology at the University of Colorado -Boulder. His current research interests include rural communities, economic development and ethnic relations in rapidly changing rural towns in the American Midwest. He also has extensive experience conducting research in rural schools. 

  • Seconds to Tragedy: Video and Curriculum for Young Worker Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    In grain bins and other grain storage facilities, it is literally just "Seconds to Tragedy". Join us as we introduce a new video, based on a true story, about a double fatality in grain. The video explores missing safety strategies that could have prevented this incident. We will explain how the video, along with a discussion sheet can be used as a training tool, both for high school agricultural teachers and for community training. These video materials compliment the Stand TALL curriculum, which can be used to expand on the concepts and safety strategies introduced in the video. This curriculum consists of three modules that educate and empower young workers with safety strategies for working in agricultural settings.

    In grain bins and other grain storage facilities, it is literally just "Seconds to Tragedy". Join us as we introduce a new video, based on a true story, about a double fatality in grain. The video explores missing safety strategies that could have prevented this incident. We will explain how the video, along with a discussion sheet can be used as a training tool, both for high school agricultural teachers and for community training. These video materials compliment the Stand TALL curriculum, which can be used to expand on the concepts and safety strategies introduced in the video. This curriculum consists of three modules that educate and empower young workers with safety strategies for working in agricultural settings.
    By the end of this webinar participants will be able to:
    1. Illustrate potential consequences when safety training and equipment are lacking. 
    2. Discuss safety strategies and tools which can be used to address hazards. 
    3. Provide resources which can be used to educate and empower young workers.

    Marsha Salwedel, Ed.D

    National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

    Marsha Salzwedel is the Agricultural Youth Safety Specialist at the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety (part of the National Farm Medicine Center) in Marshfield, Wisconsin. She is the project manager for the agritourism safety project, the agricultural youth work guidelines project, and the program manager for the Childhood Agricultural Safety Network. Working with the Grain Handling Safety Coalition, she also led the development of their youth curriculum and resources. She has a Master's Degree in Human & Community Resources from the University of Wisconsin Steven's Point. Marsha grew up on a farm and maintains her ties with that community through the farm that she and her family still own and operate.

  • Protecting Young Adults in the Agricultural Workforce

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    In 2014, The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 253,000 young workers between the ages of 16 and 24 worked in agriculture. Young workers who live and work on farms are also exposed to potentially dangerous farm-related hazards. Farm operators who hire youth to work on their farm should be aware of all applicable child labor laws. This material was produced under grant# (SH- 27642-SH5) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    In 2014, The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 253,000 young workers between the ages of 16 and 24 worked in agriculture. Young workers who live and work on farms are also exposed to potentially dangerous farm-related hazards. Farm operators who hire youth to work on their farm should be aware of all applicable child labor laws. This material was produced under grant# (SH- 27642-SH5) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
    At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify physical and psychological developmental factors to consider when employing and training young adults in the agricultural sector. 
    2. Define agricultural hazards and exposures that increase the risk of injury and illness among the young worker. 
    3. Describe regulatory standards that can promote a safe work environment for young employees. 
    4. Create action steps that can reduce agricultural injury and illness. 

    This material was produced under grant# (SH- 27642-SH5) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Accessing and Using Free Resources for Teaching Fall and Electrical Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Falls and electricity are some of the most common types of hazards encountered in agriculture. This session introduces free materials that can be used to educate others about these hazards. While these materials are ideal for school agricultural classes, the curriculum, including optional interactive activities, also work well for community education. In this "train the trainer" webinar, we will explore the different types of falls experienced on farms and how to protect against them, including fall protection systems. We will then discuss the issues associated with electrical hazards and explore strategies to prevent injuries and fatalities when working around electricity. The session will wrap up with a brief overview of other free instructional materials that can be used in combination with the fall and electrical materials to create a more comprehensive agricultural safety program.

    Farms and ranches are great places to live, work and play, and there are numerous benefits to growing up on them. However, agricultural worksites are among the most dangerous in the U.S., resulting in numerous injuries and fatalities to youth. For working youth, too many of these injuries and deaths are the result of performing work that does not match their abilities. 
    By the end of this webinar participants will be able to:
    1. Introduce free instructional materials for fall and electrical safety
    2. Discuss using the concept of "Stand T.A.L.L." to empower young workers 
    3. Identify common fall and electrical hazards
    4. Explore prevention strategies for addressing these hazards
    5. Review other free resources that can be combined with these materials to create a more comprehensive ag safety program

    Marsha Salwedel, Ed.D

    National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

    Marsha Salzwedel is the Agricultural Youth Safety Specialist at the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety (part of the National Farm Medicine Center) in Marshfield, Wisconsin. She is the project manager for the agritourism safety project, the agricultural youth work guidelines project, and the program manager for the Childhood Agricultural Safety Network. Working with the Grain Handling Safety Coalition, she also led the development of their youth curriculum and resources. She has a Master's Degree in Human & Community Resources from the University of Wisconsin Steven's Point. Marsha grew up on a farm and maintains her ties with that community through the farm that she and her family still own and operate.

  • Children and Youth: Living, working and playing safely on farms

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Farms and ranches are great places to live, work and play, and there are numerous benefits to growing up on them. However, agricultural worksites are among the most dangerous in the U.S., resulting in numerous injuries and fatalities to youth. For working youth, too many of these injuries and deaths are the result of performing work that does not match their abilities.

    Join us as we discuss "Putting Farm Safety Into Practice," featuring the newly released Agricultural Youth Work Guidelines, which help parents and supervisors assign age appropriate tasks to youth. We'll also discuss non-working children and visitors to farms and ranches, and ways to keep them safe.
    Farms and ranches are great places to live, work and play, and there are numerous benefits to growing up on them. However, agricultural worksites are among the most dangerous in the U.S., resulting in numerous injuries and fatalities to youth. For working youth, too many of these injuries and deaths are the result of performing work that does not match their abilities. 

    Marsha Salwedel, Ed.D

    National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

    Marsha Salzwedel is the Agricultural Youth Safety Specialist at the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety (part of the National Farm Medicine Center) in Marshfield, Wisconsin. She is the project manager for the agritourism safety project, the agricultural youth work guidelines project, and the program manager for the Childhood Agricultural Safety Network. Working with the Grain Handling Safety Coalition, she also led the development of their youth curriculum and resources. She has a Master's Degree in Human & Community Resources from the University of Wisconsin Steven's Point. Marsha grew up on a farm and maintains her ties with that community through the farm that she and her family still own and operate.

  • Youth Working in Agriculture: Keeping Them Safe While They Learn and Grow

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    Work is inherently good for children and youth - and agriculture offers many opportunities for them to develop work skills, learn responsibility and leadership, and gain an appreciation for farming and related industries. We also know that agricultural work can be dangerous, and that many youth are injured or killed while working in agricultural jobs.

    Work is inherently good for children and youth - and agriculture offers many opportunities for them to develop work skills, learn responsibility and leadership, and gain an appreciation for farming and related industries. We also know that agricultural work can be dangerous, and that many youth are injured or killed while working in agricultural jobs.
    Join us as we discuss strategies to help safeguard our youth, such as assigning age appropriate tasks, providing good supervision, addressing hazards, and providing personal protective equipment. We'll provide you with links to free resources and information you can use to keep youth safe while working on the farm or ranch, enabling them to learn and grow from their work experience.

    Marsha Salwedel, Ed.D

    National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

    Marsha Salzwedel is the Agricultural Youth Safety Specialist at the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety (part of the National Farm Medicine Center) in Marshfield, Wisconsin. She is the project manager for the agritourism safety project, the agricultural youth work guidelines project, and the program manager for the Childhood Agricultural Safety Network. Working with the Grain Handling Safety Coalition, she also led the development of their youth curriculum and resources. She has a Master's Degree in Human & Community Resources from the University of Wisconsin Steven's Point. Marsha grew up on a farm and maintains her ties with that community through the farm that she and her family still own and operate.

  • Children and Tractors: Myths, Facts, or Other

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Join us as we discuss the topic of children and tractors, starting at birth and moving up through adulthood. We will explore what we know, what we think we know, and what we don’t know.

    Join us as we discuss the topic of children and tractors, starting at birth and moving up through adulthood. We will explore what we know, what we think we know, and what we don’t know.
    BY the end of this webinar participants will be able to:
    1. Discuss the risks and benefits of children on the farm
    2. Explore some of the common “myths” associated with children and tractors
    3. Discuss safety concerns of babies in tractors
    4. Explore how youth can work safely in and around tractors
    5. Determine what can be done to keep visitors safe around tractors and equipment
    6. Identify resources that can be used to help safeguard children and youth around tractors

    Marsha Salwedel, Ed.D

    National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

    Marsha Salzwedel is the Agricultural Youth Safety Specialist at the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety (part of the National Farm Medicine Center) in Marshfield, Wisconsin. She is the project manager for the agritourism safety project, the agricultural youth work guidelines project, and the program manager for the Childhood Agricultural Safety Network. Working with the Grain Handling Safety Coalition, she also led the development of their youth curriculum and resources. She has a Master's Degree in Human & Community Resources from the University of Wisconsin Steven's Point. Marsha grew up on a farm and maintains her ties with that community through the farm that she and her family still own and operate.