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  • New Immigrants in the Midwest and Agricultural Health Implications

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The Midwest is changing rapidly due to globalization, human migration, and new economic patterns. Immigrants and refugees are among the fastest-growing populations in this region of the United States, with a significant number employed in farming, meatpacking, and related agricultural industries. This webinar describes these new demographic patterns, discusses their implications from a public health standpoint, and provides general strategies for professionals working with immigrant and refugee employees in the agricultural jobs.

    The Midwest is changing rapidly due to globalization, human migration, and new economic patterns. Immigrants and refugees are among the fastest growing populations in this region of the United States, with a significant number employed in farming, meatpacking, and related agricultural industries. This webinar describes these new demographic patterns, discusses their implications from a public health standpoint, and provides general strategies for professionals working with immigrant and refugee employees in the agricultural jobs.
    By the end of this webinar participants will be able to:
    1. To understand the changing demographics of the Midwest; 
    2. To analyze the implications of these demographic changes for the health of agricultural workers; and
    3. To gain strategies for working effectively in the public health field with immigrant and refugee agricultural workers 

    Michele Devlin, DrPH

    Division Chair & Professor, Health Promotion and Education & Director, Iowa Center on Health Disparities - University of Northern Iowa

    Dr. Michele Devlin is Professor of Global Public Health and Chair of the Division of Health Promotion and Education at the University of Northern Iowa. She also founded the Iowa Center on Health Disparities, a model organization established by the National Institutes of Health to improve health equity for underserved populations, and is Director of the UNI Global Health Corps humanitarian relief organization.  Dr. Devlin is also Adjunct Research Professor with the United States Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.  She completed her doctorate degree in international public health at the University of California at Los Angeles.  Her primary areas of specialty include human migration, maternal and child health, and disaster response with refugee and minority populations. 

    Mark Grey, PhD

    Professor of Anthropology and Director, The Iowa Center for Immigrant Leadership and Integration - University of Northern Iowa

    Mark Grey is associate professor if anthropology at the University of Northern Iowa. He received his PhD in applied anthropology at the University of Colorado -Boulder. His current research interests include rural communities, economic development and ethnic relations in rapidly changing rural towns in the American Midwest. He also has extensive experience conducting research in rural schools. 

  • Seconds to Tragedy: Video and Curriculum for Young Worker Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    In grain bins and other grain storage facilities, it is literally just "Seconds to Tragedy". Join us as we introduce a new video, based on a true story, about a double fatality in grain. The video explores missing safety strategies that could have prevented this incident. We will explain how the video, along with a discussion sheet can be used as a training tool, both for high school agricultural teachers and for community training. These video materials compliment the Stand TALL curriculum, which can be used to expand on the concepts and safety strategies introduced in the video. This curriculum consists of three modules that educate and empower young workers with safety strategies for working in agricultural settings.

    In grain bins and other grain storage facilities, it is literally just "Seconds to Tragedy". Join us as we introduce a new video, based on a true story, about a double fatality in grain. The video explores missing safety strategies that could have prevented this incident. We will explain how the video, along with a discussion sheet can be used as a training tool, both for high school agricultural teachers and for community training. These video materials compliment the Stand TALL curriculum, which can be used to expand on the concepts and safety strategies introduced in the video. This curriculum consists of three modules that educate and empower young workers with safety strategies for working in agricultural settings.
    By the end of this webinar participants will be able to:
    1. Illustrate potential consequences when safety training and equipment are lacking. 
    2. Discuss safety strategies and tools which can be used to address hazards. 
    3. Provide resources which can be used to educate and empower young workers.

    Marsha Salwedel, Ed.D

    National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

    Marsha Salzwedel is the Agricultural Youth Safety Specialist at the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety (part of the National Farm Medicine Center) in Marshfield, Wisconsin. She is the project manager for the agritourism safety project, the agricultural youth work guidelines project, and the program manager for the Childhood Agricultural Safety Network. Working with the Grain Handling Safety Coalition, she also led the development of their youth curriculum and resources. She has a Master's Degree in Human & Community Resources from the University of Wisconsin Steven's Point. Marsha grew up on a farm and maintains her ties with that community through the farm that she and her family still own and operate.

  • Protecting Young Adults in the Agricultural Workforce

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    In 2014, The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 253,000 young workers between the ages of 16 and 24 worked in agriculture. Young workers who live and work on farms are also exposed to potentially dangerous farm-related hazards. Farm operators who hire youth to work on their farm should be aware of all applicable child labor laws. This material was produced under grant# (SH- 27642-SH5) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    In 2014, The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 253,000 young workers between the ages of 16 and 24 worked in agriculture. Young workers who live and work on farms are also exposed to potentially dangerous farm-related hazards. Farm operators who hire youth to work on their farm should be aware of all applicable child labor laws. This material was produced under grant# (SH- 27642-SH5) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
    At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify physical and psychological developmental factors to consider when employing and training young adults in the agricultural sector. 
    2. Define agricultural hazards and exposures that increase the risk of injury and illness among the young worker. 
    3. Describe regulatory standards that can promote a safe work environment for young employees. 
    4. Create action steps that can reduce agricultural injury and illness. 

    This material was produced under grant# (SH- 27642-SH5) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Accessing and Using Free Resources for Teaching Fall and Electrical Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Falls and electricity are some of the most common types of hazards encountered in agriculture. This session introduces free materials that can be used to educate others about these hazards. While these materials are ideal for school agricultural classes, the curriculum, including optional interactive activities, also work well for community education. In this "train the trainer" webinar, we will explore the different types of falls experienced on farms and how to protect against them, including fall protection systems. We will then discuss the issues associated with electrical hazards and explore strategies to prevent injuries and fatalities when working around electricity. The session will wrap up with a brief overview of other free instructional materials that can be used in combination with the fall and electrical materials to create a more comprehensive agricultural safety program.

    Farms and ranches are great places to live, work and play, and there are numerous benefits to growing up on them. However, agricultural worksites are among the most dangerous in the U.S., resulting in numerous injuries and fatalities to youth. For working youth, too many of these injuries and deaths are the result of performing work that does not match their abilities. 
    By the end of this webinar participants will be able to:
    1. Introduce free instructional materials for fall and electrical safety
    2. Discuss using the concept of "Stand T.A.L.L." to empower young workers 
    3. Identify common fall and electrical hazards
    4. Explore prevention strategies for addressing these hazards
    5. Review other free resources that can be combined with these materials to create a more comprehensive ag safety program

    Marsha Salwedel, Ed.D

    National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

    Marsha Salzwedel is the Agricultural Youth Safety Specialist at the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety (part of the National Farm Medicine Center) in Marshfield, Wisconsin. She is the project manager for the agritourism safety project, the agricultural youth work guidelines project, and the program manager for the Childhood Agricultural Safety Network. Working with the Grain Handling Safety Coalition, she also led the development of their youth curriculum and resources. She has a Master's Degree in Human & Community Resources from the University of Wisconsin Steven's Point. Marsha grew up on a farm and maintains her ties with that community through the farm that she and her family still own and operate.

  • Children and Youth: Living, working and playing safely on farms

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Farms and ranches are great places to live, work and play, and there are numerous benefits to growing up on them. However, agricultural worksites are among the most dangerous in the U.S., resulting in numerous injuries and fatalities to youth. For working youth, too many of these injuries and deaths are the result of performing work that does not match their abilities.

    Join us as we discuss "Putting Farm Safety Into Practice," featuring the newly released Agricultural Youth Work Guidelines, which help parents and supervisors assign age appropriate tasks to youth. We'll also discuss non-working children and visitors to farms and ranches, and ways to keep them safe.
    Farms and ranches are great places to live, work and play, and there are numerous benefits to growing up on them. However, agricultural worksites are among the most dangerous in the U.S., resulting in numerous injuries and fatalities to youth. For working youth, too many of these injuries and deaths are the result of performing work that does not match their abilities. 

    Marsha Salwedel, Ed.D

    National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

    Marsha Salzwedel is the Agricultural Youth Safety Specialist at the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety (part of the National Farm Medicine Center) in Marshfield, Wisconsin. She is the project manager for the agritourism safety project, the agricultural youth work guidelines project, and the program manager for the Childhood Agricultural Safety Network. Working with the Grain Handling Safety Coalition, she also led the development of their youth curriculum and resources. She has a Master's Degree in Human & Community Resources from the University of Wisconsin Steven's Point. Marsha grew up on a farm and maintains her ties with that community through the farm that she and her family still own and operate.

  • Youth Working in Agriculture: Keeping Them Safe While They Learn and Grow

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    Work is inherently good for children and youth - and agriculture offers many opportunities for them to develop work skills, learn responsibility and leadership, and gain an appreciation for farming and related industries. We also know that agricultural work can be dangerous, and that many youth are injured or killed while working in agricultural jobs.

    Work is inherently good for children and youth - and agriculture offers many opportunities for them to develop work skills, learn responsibility and leadership, and gain an appreciation for farming and related industries. We also know that agricultural work can be dangerous, and that many youth are injured or killed while working in agricultural jobs.
    Join us as we discuss strategies to help safeguard our youth, such as assigning age appropriate tasks, providing good supervision, addressing hazards, and providing personal protective equipment. We'll provide you with links to free resources and information you can use to keep youth safe while working on the farm or ranch, enabling them to learn and grow from their work experience.

    Marsha Salwedel, Ed.D

    National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

    Marsha Salzwedel is the Agricultural Youth Safety Specialist at the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety (part of the National Farm Medicine Center) in Marshfield, Wisconsin. She is the project manager for the agritourism safety project, the agricultural youth work guidelines project, and the program manager for the Childhood Agricultural Safety Network. Working with the Grain Handling Safety Coalition, she also led the development of their youth curriculum and resources. She has a Master's Degree in Human & Community Resources from the University of Wisconsin Steven's Point. Marsha grew up on a farm and maintains her ties with that community through the farm that she and her family still own and operate.

  • Children and Tractors: Myths, Facts, or Other

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Join us as we discuss the topic of children and tractors, starting at birth and moving up through adulthood. We will explore what we know, what we think we know, and what we don’t know.

    Join us as we discuss the topic of children and tractors, starting at birth and moving up through adulthood. We will explore what we know, what we think we know, and what we don’t know.
    BY the end of this webinar participants will be able to:
    1. Discuss the risks and benefits of children on the farm
    2. Explore some of the common “myths” associated with children and tractors
    3. Discuss safety concerns of babies in tractors
    4. Explore how youth can work safely in and around tractors
    5. Determine what can be done to keep visitors safe around tractors and equipment
    6. Identify resources that can be used to help safeguard children and youth around tractors

    Marsha Salwedel, Ed.D

    National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

    Marsha Salzwedel is the Agricultural Youth Safety Specialist at the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety (part of the National Farm Medicine Center) in Marshfield, Wisconsin. She is the project manager for the agritourism safety project, the agricultural youth work guidelines project, and the program manager for the Childhood Agricultural Safety Network. Working with the Grain Handling Safety Coalition, she also led the development of their youth curriculum and resources. She has a Master's Degree in Human & Community Resources from the University of Wisconsin Steven's Point. Marsha grew up on a farm and maintains her ties with that community through the farm that she and her family still own and operate.

  • Assessment of Opioid Misuse Risk Among Farmers in the Clinical Setting

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Prescription opioids are often the first-line therapy to treat chronic and acute pain among farmers. Prescribing opioids to farmer populations that may not seek regular treatment or have access to alternative therapies increases the risk for potential opioid misuse. Properly assessing for these characteristics among other abuse or addiction risk factors, is critical in providing treatment that is both appropriate and effective. The training module will seek to provide insight on misuse risk factors among farmers to better inform healthcare providers on warning signs in this specific cohort.

    Prescription opioids are often the first-line therapy to treat chronic and acute pain among farmers. Prescribing opioids to farmer populations that may not seek regular treatment or have access to alternative therapies increases the risk for potential opioid misuse. Properly assessing for these characteristics among other abuse or addiction risk factors, is critical in providing treatment that is both appropriate and effective. The training module will seek to provide insight on misuse risk factors among farmers to better inform healthcare providers on warning signs in this specific cohort.
    By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: 
    1. List potential risk factors for opioid misuse among farmers.
    2. Understand proper opioid misuse assessment strategies.
    3. Identify effective alternatives for treating chronic and acute pain among farmers

    Sponsored by:

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    This project was supported by the FY17 USDA NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant # 2017-46100-27225 and the FY18 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants (ROTA) # TI-18-022

    Dr. Ali Hartman, DPT

    Consulting PT, CF-L1, Pro-Activity North Carolina

    Clinically trained as a Doctor of Physical Therapy, Ali harbors a deep appreciation for the human body and the resilience it holds. Unlike traditional rehabilitation professionals, Ali spends the majority of her time outside of the clinic walls, embedding herself within working populations to maximize the health, well-being, and performance of groups and individuals while leveraging her unique experience in workplace prevention and health promotion.

    She has completed advanced certifications in Applied Prevention and Health Promotion Therapies, and residency at Pro-Activity, a human achievement company that has specialized in workplace prevention and health promotion with industrialized workforces for the past 20 years. Ali was recently named managing partner of Pro-Activity’s North Carolina field office.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Engaging Guestworkers in Occupational Safety Research in Forestry

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The southern US contains some of the most intensively managed forests in the world that provide the bulk of the nation's softwood lumber and pulp. There is a paucity of research on the burden of injury, illness, and fatalities among reforestation workers in this region. Latino guest workers make up more than 85% of the reforestation workforce in the region. Efforts to delineate health and safety risk factors associated with tree planters require employer/contractor buy-in and support from crew leaders and industry associations. A participatory approach to research is critical to the success of this study and recruitment efforts must be culturally sensitive to the needs of this work group.

    The southern US contains some of the most intensively managed forests in the world that provide the bulk of the nation's softwood lumber and pulp. There is a paucity of research on the burden of injury, illness, and fatalities among reforestation workers in this region.  Latino guest workers make up more than 85% of the reforestation workforce in the region. Efforts to delineate health and safety risk factors associated with tree planters require employer/contractor buy-in and support from crew leaders and industry associations. A participatory approach to research is critical to the success of this study and recruitment efforts must be culturally sensitive to the needs of this work group.
    At the end of the presentation, attendees will be able to:
    1. Identify the burden of injury, illness and fatalities of reforestation workers in the southern U.S.
    2. Define the nature of the organization of work in this particular sector of forestry.
    3. Describe the reforestation workforce.
    4. List the socio-cultural factors that must be considered when engaging this population in research.

    Vanessa Cassanova, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences at The University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Tyler

    Dr. Cassanova serves as the Applied Research Manager for the Southwest Center for Agricultural Health, Injury Prevention, and Education. Dr. Casanova has extensive research experience with loggers and migrant and immigrant workers in the southern forest industry.  Her work is broadly focused on the organization of work and its impact on safety and health outcomes and health disparities in the workplace.

  • Designing, Evaluating and Using Apps and Wearable Technology for Agricultural Workers' Safety and Health

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Mobile and wearable devices and the application software, also known as apps, that run on these devices are becoming ubiquitous in the general population. This is also true in agriculturally related populations. This reality has tremendous potential for improving the health and safety of individuals that work in agriculture. A plethora of apps and devices already exist that can be used for the assessment of workplace hazards and implementation of worker protection. However, very little guidance on the use of these apps for agricultural safety and health exists. This presentation will briefly cover the basics of designing apps and wearable technology, report on a study that developed a framework for evaluating apps and technology that have potential usefulness in this area and present some of the current applications of wearable technology and apps in agricultural safety and health research and outreach.

    Mobile and wearable devices and the application software, also known as apps, that run on these devices are becoming ubiquitous in the general population. This is also true in agriculturally related populations. This reality has tremendous potential for improving the health and safety of individuals that work in agriculture. A plethora of apps and devices already exist that can be used for the assessment of workplace hazards and implementation of worker protection. However, very little guidance on the use of these apps for agricultural safety and health exists. This presentation will briefly cover the basics of designing apps and wearable technology, report on a study that developed a framework for evaluating apps and technology that have potential usefulness in this area and present some of the current applications of wearable technology and apps in agricultural safety and health research and outreach.
    At the end of this webinar participants will be able to:
    1. Be able to describe mobile technology, including wearable devices and application software  
    2. Understand the design process for apps and wearable technology  
    3. Learn how to evaluate technology related to agricultural safety and health  
    4. Increase awareness of how mobile technology can be used in safety and health

    Aaron M. Yoder, PhD

    Associate Professor, Environmental, Agricultural and Occupational Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Extension - Biological Systems Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

    Aaron Yoder grew up in central Pennsylvania where he spent time working on his grandfather's farm. He graduated from Penn State University with a BS and MS in Agricultural Systems Management and Environmental Pollution Control, respectively. He went on to complete a PhD from Purdue University in Agricultural and Biological Engineering where he focused on ergonomic evaluation of assistive technology for AgrAbility clients. Aaron is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental, Agricultural and Occupational Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and works with projects through the NIOSH funded Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health. He is the president of the International Society for Agricultural Safety and Health and serves on the Board of Directors of the Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America and Progressive Agriculture Foundation. Dr. Yoder also maintains leadership roles in the eXtension.org/AgSafety Community of Practice, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers and the USDA NCERA197 Committee for establishing priorities at Land Grant University for agricultural safety and health research and education programs. More information on Dr. Yoder can be found at: