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  • Optimizing the Health of the Female Agricultural Producer

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The number of U.S. farms operated by women has increased by nearly 60% over the past three decades, from 5 percent in 1978 to 30 percent in 2012. Farm women face unique environmental exposures, ergonomic challenges, and health disparities. Health and safety initiatives are traditionally targeted to male agricultural producers. Examining the unique health care concerns of the female agriculturist as well as strategies to integrate care for this population is the take home message within this presentation. Funding for this project provided by the Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health, NIOSH AFF Grant U54OH010162.

    The number of U.S. farms operated by women has increased by nearly 60% over the past three decades, from 5 percent in 1978 to 30 percent in 2012. Farm women face unique environmental exposures, ergonomic challenges, and health disparities. Health and safety initiatives are traditionally targeted to male agricultural producers. Examining the unique health care concerns of the female agriculturist as well as strategies to integrate care for this population is the take home message within this presentation. 
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to: 
    1. Describe today’s profile of a female agricultural producer. 
    2. Identify at least four leading health indicators impacting women in agriculture. 
    3. Locate three current evidenced based resources in the field of agricultural health and safety

    Funding for this project provided by the Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health, NIOSH AFF Grant U54OH010162.

    Linda Emanuel, RN

    Community Health Nurse, AgriSafe Network

    Good health advocacy has been at the heart of Linda’s essence from her formative years as a farm girl in eastern Nebraska. Graduating from Nebraska Methodist School of Nursing in 1985, she worked as an R.N. in a variety of acute care hospital settings for over 30 years. She and her husband Tom raised three sons on a successful row crop operation that has been able to welcome the next generation and their families home to continue to diversify their family business. Linda served as a Fellow in the Nebraska LEAD program and has also received agrimedicine training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Linda now serves on the advisory board for CS-CASH and a member of the AgriSafe team, as a Community Health Nurse.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Safe and Healthy Recovery After a Farm Flood

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Disaster recovery can be as dangerous as the disaster itself, especially if no disaster preparedness plan was implemented. This is especially true on farms and ranches where inherent farm hazards such as machinery and equipment, livestock, and agriculture chemicals are displaced and co-mingle, putting all emergency response personnel, farm workers and family members in danger. Floods can heighten the risk of health threats such as mold, tetanus bacteria, contaminated well water, heat illness and high stress. This presentation will highlight basic precautions to prevent possible diseases and injuries during and after flooding.

    Disaster recovery can be as dangerous as the disaster itself, especially if no disaster preparedness plan was implemented. This is especially true on farms and ranches where inherent farm hazards such as machinery and equipment, livestock, and agriculture chemicals are displaced and co-mingle, putting all emergency response personnel, farm workers and family members in danger. Floods can heighten the risk of health threats such as mold, tetanus bacteria, contaminated well water, heat illness and high stress. This presentation will highlight basic precautions to prevent possible diseases and injuries during and after flooding. 
    By the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to: 
    · Identify common human health risks faced during a farm flood. 
    · Discuss prevention tips and injury prevention for common human health risks. 
    · Identify AgriSafe and external resources to address human health risks during a farm flood.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

    Chad Roy, PhD, MSPH

    Director, Infectious Disease Aerobiology, Director, Biodefense Research Programs, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Professor of Microbiology & Immunology, Tulane School of Medicin

    Dr. Roy is a professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Tulane University School of Medicine and also the Director of Infectious Disease Aerobiology at the Tulane National Primate Research Center. Dr. Roy's research focuses on respiratory health and the aerobiology of infectious diseases.

  • The Ergonomics of Hand Planting Reforestation Work

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Reforestation work is vital to the health of America's forests and the U.S. economy. Hand planting, a common reforestation practice, provides unique challenges to safety and health practitioners interested in reducing occupational injuries and illnesses. This webinar will share lessons learned from a team of investigators studying occupational exposures to physical risk factors among hand planters in the Southeastern United States.

    Reforestation work is vital to the health of America's forests and the U.S. economy. Hand planting, a common reforestation practice, provides unique challenges to safety and health practitioners interested in reducing occupational injuries and illnesses. This webinar will share lessons learned from a team of investigators studying occupational exposures to physical risk factors among hand planters in the Southeastern United States.
    At the end of this webinar, participants will have a better understanding of 
    1. What hand planting work involves
    2. The challenges associated with collecting exposure information within the agriculture, forestry, and fishing industry sector
    3. The importance of studying and preventing injuries and illnesses among reforestation workers.

    Mark Schall, PhD, CPE

    Assistant Professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Auburn University

    Mark Schall earned his PhD in Industrial Engineering from the University of Iowa in December 2014 where he was a graduate fellow of the Heartland Education and Research Center and the Healthier Workforce Center for Excellence. His primary research interests are in applying direct measurement technologies to assess exposure to physical risk factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders and developing ergonomic interventions that reduce the incidence of adverse health conditions among working people.

    Robert Granzow, MS, AEP

    Robert F. Granzow, MS, AEP is a PhD candidate in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering in the College of Engineering at Auburn University. He is a student in the Deep South Center for Occupational Health and Safety (a NIOSH Education and Research Center) Occupational Ergonomics and Safety program.

  • Farmer's Preferences for Hearing Protection Devices: Do Educational Interventions Work?

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Although 44% of Midwestern farmers reported noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) symptoms, less than one-third report using hearing protection devices (HPDs) when working around loud noises. Few studies have evaluated which HPD models farmers prefer to wear, and how educational activities may influence this preference. Dr. Gibbs will be discussing current research on farmer’s priorities and preferences for HPD types, as well as the impact of several hearing conservation education activities.

    Although 44% of Midwestern farmers reported noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) symptoms, less than one third report using hearing protection devices (HPDs) when working around loud noises. Few studies have evaluated which HPD models farmers prefer to wear, and how educational activities may influence this preference. Dr. Gibbs will be discussing current research on farmer’s priorities and preferences for HPD types, as well as the impact of several hearing conservation education activities.
    At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:
    1. Discuss the prevalence of Noise-Induced-Hearing-Loss (NIHL) symptoms among farmers.
    2. List farmer's top priorities and concerns when choosing hearing protection devices.
    3. Learn about the best HPD models to promote in agricultural hearing conservation campaigns.
    4. Learn more about how to implement successful hearing conservation educational activities.

    Jenna Gibbs, PhD, MPH

    Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health, University of Iowa

    Jenna Gibbs has been the Center Coordinator of the Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health (GPCAH) at the University of Iowa for two years. Prior to her work at GPCAH, Jenna was an industrial hygienist at NIOSH/CDC in Morgantown, WV. Jenna got her PhD in environmental health at University of Washington, while working at the Pacific Northwest Agricultural Health and Safety Center.  Her research interests include hearing conservation, pesticides, and air quality improvements in livestock operation.

  • Pharm to Farm: Partnerships to Make Clinical Pharmacy Services Accessible to Missouri Farmers

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    This session will discuss the partnerships and collaborations to deliver clinical pharmacy services to farmers and ranchers, as well as describe how health professions students are trained to become partners in agricultural health and safety.

    This session will discuss the partnerships and collaborations to deliver clinical pharmacy services to farmers and ranchers, as well as describe how health professions students are trained to become partners in agricultural health and safety.
    Objectives: 
    - Recognize the benefits of the delivery of clinical pharmacy services in rural communities 
    - Identify opportunities for collaboration with health professions schools to provide outreach services to AgrAbility clients 
    - Describe how student pharmacists can be equipped with skills to fill healthcare gaps in rural areas and serve as partners in agricultural health and safety

    Kelly Cochran, PharmD, BCPS

    Kelly Cochran is a clinical associate professor at University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Pharmacy at MU and is a board certified pharmacotherapy specialist. In 2010 she developed the first ambulatory care clinical pharmacy services at the University of Missouri General Internal Medicine Clinics in Columbia, where she serves as a clinical pharmacy specialist and precepts pharmacy students and residents. Pursuing her interest in rural health, she developed Pharm to Farm, a mobile practice and teaching service which provides on-site farmstead medication assessments to farmers/ranchers throughout Missouri and has partnerships with Missouri Extension and Missouri AgrAbility Project. She has completed a certificate in Agricultural Health and Safety-The Core Course and is an AgriSafe member. Her current research includes evaluation of medication-related agricultural injury among Missouri farmers. She grew up on a farm in Indiana and earned her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Butler University in Indianapolis. She completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City and an Ambulatory Care Specialty Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy and Medical Center.

  • Prevention of Grain Dust Explosions

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    This Grain Safety program is intended for workers and managers in the grain industry including grain elevators, farm operators and workers, grain haulers, and agriculture business owners. The major focus of the program is on safety in confined space work areas including entry, respiratory protection, and prevention of Grain Dust explosions.

    This Grain Safety program is intended for workers and managers in the grain industry including grain elevators, farm operators and workers, grain haulers, and agriculture business owners. The major focus of the program is on safety in confined space work areas including entry, respiratory protection, and prevention of Grain Dust explosions.
    At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will:
    1. Describe several recent dust explosions and the dust deflagration process
    2. Identify the basic considerations used in a facility hazard analysis for dust 
    3. Describe the prevention and mitigation techniques used in control of the combustible dust hazard 
    4. Describe Minimum Explosive Concentration (MEC) 
    5. Identify combustible particulate solids
    6. Identify training needed for employees
    7. Identify housekeeping techniques to prevent an grain dust explosion
    8. Understand employees’ rights and responsibilities
    9. Describe the OSHA Agricultural exemption

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Respiratory Protection Program Adapted to Grain Handling Operations

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    The OSHA respiratory standard requires a written respiratory protection program for situations in which permissible exposure levels (PELs) of airborne contaminants could be exceeded or when the employer requires use of respirators by workers. This training will assist agriculture-based employers who require respirator use to comply with the OSHA respiratory protection program standard. Training includes written worksite specific procedures, program evaluation, selection of an appropriate respirator approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), training, fit testing, inspection, cleaning, maintenance, and storage, medical evaluation, work area surveillance and air quality standards. This material was produced under a grant (SH-31230-SH7) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government

    The OSHA respiratory standard requires a written respiratory protection program for situations in which permissible exposure levels (PELs) of airborne contaminants could be exceeded or when the employer requires use of respirators by workers. This training will assist agriculture-based employers who require respirator use to comply with the OSHA respiratory protection program standard. Training includes written worksite specific procedures, program evaluation, selection of an appropriate respirator approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), training, fit testing, inspection, cleaning, maintenance, and storage, medical evaluation, work area surveillance and air quality standards.
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to: 
    1. Recognize the diverse respiratory hazards unique to agricultural and the justification for a comprehensive respiratory program. 
    2. Identify the OSHA respirator standards that apply to an agricultural setting. 
    3. Understand key components of an effective respiratory protection program. 
    4. Learn how to access resources, templates, medical evaluations, and further trainings to effectively implement a respiratory program.

    This material was produced under a grant (SH-31230-SH7) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Confined Space - Grain Bin Entry

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    The Confined Space Grain Safety program is intended for workers and managers in agriculture. This includes Coop's, farm operators, employees, and agriculture business owners. The major focus of the program is on safety in confined space work areas.

    The Confined Space Grain Safety program is intended for workers and managers in agriculture. This includes Coop's, farm operators, employees, and agriculture business owners. The major focus of the program is on safety in confined space work areas.
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

    1. Be able to identify hazards associated with confined space work. 
    2. Understand the process for confined space entry and lock out/ tag out procedures. 
    3. Understand monitoring the air quality in a Confined Space. 
    4. Understand the harnesses that need to be worn during an entry 
    5. Understand the job responsibilities of a confined space attendant 
    6. Know where to look for OSHA references and resources related to confined space entry in the grain industry. 

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue.