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Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
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  • Contains 3 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 03/07/2024 at 12:00 PM (CST)

    Overdose deaths are a leading cause of injury-related death in the United States and the majority of overdose deaths involve opioids. This epidemic is impacting communities all across the country. Naloxone is a life-saving medication that can reverse an overdose from opioids when given in time. This session is designed to prepare communities and non-medical public and safety professionals to recognize and respond to an opioid overdose. Participants will learn the warning signs of opioid overdose and how to intervene safely using naloxone.

    Overdose deaths are a leading cause of injury-related death in the United States and the majority of overdose deaths involve opioids. This epidemic is impacting communities all across the country. Naloxone is a life-saving medication that can reverse an overdose from opioids when given in time. This session is designed to prepare communities and non-medical public and safety professionals to recognize and respond to an opioid overdose. Participants will learn the warning signs of opioid overdose and how to intervene safely using naloxone. 

    At the end of this webinar participants will be able to:

    • Identify risk factors for opioid intentional and nonintentional overdose
    • Recognize the signs of opioid overdose
    • Respond effectively to an opioid overdose
    • Correctly administer intranasal naloxone

    Tara Haskins, DNP, MSN, RN, AHN-BC

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

  • Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/01/2024

    The Chainsaw Safety training program is intended for workers and managers in the agricultural and forestry industries. The major focus of the program is on the identification of and the safe operation of chainsaws. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 36,000 people are injured by chainsaws annually.

    Summary: The Chainsaw Safety training program is intended for workers and managers in the agricultural and forestry industries.  The major focus of the program is on the identification of and the safe operation of chainsaws.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 36,000 people are injured by chainsaws annually.

    Intended Audience: This course is intended for workers in forestry and logging, including fallers, first-line supervisors/managers of forestry workers, logging equipment operators, sawing machine setters, operators and tenders, and truck drivers.

    Objectives: At the conclusion of the training, participants will be able to:

    1. Describe the purpose of OSHA’s rule on Chainsaw Safety.
    2. Explain the basic requirements of Chainsaw Safety.
    3. List the components of creating a safe work environment.
    4. Discuss the proper PPE to be worn during chainsaw operations.
    5. Review the precheck of the equipment before starting the job.

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/15/2023

    As people spend more time outdoors, so do many insects and pests. Among them are ticks, which are small bloodsucking insects. The deer tick (also known as the black-legged tick) is found mainly in the Eastern and upper Midwestern regions of the U.S. It can cause conditions such as Lyme disease – the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. This webinar will cover the things you need to know to prevent tick bites when working outdoors, how to remove a tick if bitten, as well as the symptoms that can result from tick bites that may indicate Lyme Disease.

    Summary: As people spend more time outdoors, so do many insects and pests. Among them are ticks, which are small bloodsucking insects. The deer tick (also known as the black-legged tick) is found mainly in the Eastern and upper Midwestern regions of the U.S. It can cause conditions such as Lyme disease – the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. This webinar will cover the things you need to know to prevent tick bites when working outdoors, how to remove a tick if bitten, as well as the symptoms that can result from tick bites that may indicate Lyme Disease.

    Intended Audience: This course is intended for Ag professionals, educators, and individuals involved in working and recreation outdoors.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    Gain an understanding of tick-borne disease control measures to reduce exposure risks among ag workers.
    Describe Lyme Disease and its regional variation.
    Describe symptoms of the different types of Lyme Disease.
    Identify workers’ rights and employers’ responsibilities for the workplace.

    Abigail Kahrs, MPH

    Program Coordinator

    AgriSafe Network

    Abigail Kahrs is the Program Coordinator for AgriSafe. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Animal Science as well as a Master’s in Public Health. She organizes, and coordinates educational opportunities and resources for farmers, farm labor contractors, farm workers, and their families on issues associated with health and work safety (pesticide safety, weather protection, and other occupational hazards) as well as overall agricultural worker family well-being. She primarily assists in the scheduling, training, and reporting of women’s health, infectious diseases, and youth safety programs at AgriSafe Network.

  • Contains 6 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/11/2023

    Forestry and logging workers are exposed to a range of biological hazards, extreme weather, accidents, and – especially for women– assault. Workplace violence is violence or the threat of violence against workers. This training will review the many forms of workplace violence among co-workers, including sexual harassment. The federal Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act) states that “each employer shall furnish to each of his employees’ employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees.” In this presentation, AgriSafe will focus on educating forestry employees and their employers on reporting violent incidents to authorities, informing employees of their legal rights, and safe work practices.

    Summary: Forestry and logging workers are exposed to a range of biological hazards, extreme weather, accidents, and – especially for women– assault. Workplace violence is violence or the threat of violence against workers. This training will review the many forms of workplace violence among co-workers, including sexual harassment. The federal Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act) states that “each employer shall furnish to each of his employees’ employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees.” In this presentation, AgriSafe will focus on educating forestry employees and their employers on reporting violent incidents to authorities, informing employees of their legal rights, and safe work practices.

    Intended Audience: This course is intended for workers in forestry and logging, including fallers, first-line supervisors/managers of forestry workers, logging equipment operators, sawing machine setters, operators and tenders, and truck drivers.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to understand…

    1. The scope and nature of workplace violence occurring in the forestry sector today.

    2. Employers’ responsibilities in addressing workplace violence and implementing preventive measures.

    3. Effective strategies and interventions can make the workplace safer and more responsive to employee victims.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health and Equity Director

    AgriSafe Network

    Mrs. Knesha Rose-Davison serves as the Public Health and Equity Director for AgriSafe Network. She has over 17 years of public health experience in maternal and child health, community health, health disparities, and advocacy. In May 2016, she joined AgriSafe Network as their health communications director, quickly growing into their public health programs director, where she managed employer-employee safety training for youth working in agriculture, opioid safety for health providers and agricultural workers, and women’s health topics. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) and a Master of Public Health (2006) from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine focused on rural occupational health, environmental health, and safety. She is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association, where she serves in leadership. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity, and she aligns all her work with these causes.

  • Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 01/17/2024

    The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) provides resources and connections for individuals and communities regarding suicide prevention and postvention. The aftermath of a suicide can be lonely and isolating for those left behind. This special webinar will focus on AFSP’s Healing Conversations, a no-cost program for people impacted by suicide loss. Learn how to access the program for yourself or someone you know struggling with suicide loss.

    Summary: The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) provides resources and connections for individuals and communities regarding suicide prevention and postvention. The aftermath of a suicide can be lonely and isolating for those left behind. This special webinar will focus on AFSP’s Healing Conversations, a no-cost program for people impacted by suicide loss. Learn how to access the program for yourself or someone you know struggling with suicide loss.

    Intended Audience: 18+ older, community leaders, loss survivors, caregivers, etc.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    1. Share information about AFSP’s Healing Conversations
    2. Discuss crisis intervention and postvention resources
    3. Locate suicide loss and healing resources

    Bubba Randall

    American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Louisiana Chapter

    Bubba has volunteered with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Louisiana Chapter (AFSP Louisiana) for eight years. He joined AFSP shortly after losing his son, Jessie Randall, to suicide on April 7, 2015. Bubba is the immediate past Chair of the chapter and currently serves as Healing Conversations Coordinator for the state and is a member of AFSP’s national Loss and Healing Council. His passion is to help other survivors of a suicide loss and let them know they are not alone. Bubba is trained in ASIST and safeTALK.

    Cynthia Elmer

    Healing Conversations Volunteer

    American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Louisiana Chapter

    Cynthia has been a longtime volunteer for AFSP and was one of the founding members of the Louisiana Chapter, after losing her son Kevin to suicide. She served several years on the AFSP board and continues to volunteer with the chapter on several committees. Cynthia is a Healing Conversations volunteer and works tirelessly to advocate for suicide prevention across the state as an Advocacy Ambassador. Cynthia is trained in ASIST and safeTALK.

    Meghan Goldbeck

    Executive Director

    American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Louisiana and Mississippi Chapters

    Meghan Goldbeck is the Executive Director of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s Louisiana and Mississippi Chapters. Meghan has had a career in the nonprofit sector for over a decade and is a strong advocate for mental health and suicide prevention in her community. She received a bachelor’s degree from Southern Illinois University Carbondale and is currently working on obtaining a master’s degree in Nonprofit Administration from Louisiana State University Shreveport. She is certified in Mental Health First Aid and safeTALK.

  • Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/13/2023

    Forest workers face unique ergonomic challenges due to their exposure to extreme environmental conditions, heavy workload, and dangerous tools and machines. The forest sector has one of the highest rates of Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs), almost 100 times higher than the industrial targets the National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) set. This program is intended to help forest workers identify ergonomic issues leading to musculoskeletal injuries and discover resources to aid in injury treatment and prevention.

    Summary: Forest workers face unique ergonomic challenges due to their exposure to extreme environmental conditions, heavy workload, and dangerous tools and machines. The forest sector has one of the highest rates of Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs), almost 100 times higher than the industrial targets the National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) set. This program is intended to help forest workers identify ergonomic issues leading to musculoskeletal injuries and discover resources to aid in injury treatment and prevention.

    Objectives: At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to…

    1. Identify work site hazards and potential resulting musculoskeletal injuries.

    2. Identify three initiatives aimed at reducing risks related to musculoskeletal injuries.

    3. Locate evidence-based resources in the forestry health and safety field that address ergonomic security.

    Intended Audience: This course is intended for workers in forestry and logging, including fallers, first-line supervisors/managers of forestry workers, logging equipment operators, sawing machine setters, operators and tenders, and truck drivers.

    Abigail Kahrs, MPH

    Program Coordinator

    AgriSafe Network

    Abigail Kahrs is the Program Coordinator for AgriSafe. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Animal Science as well as a Master’s in Public Health. She organizes, and coordinates educational opportunities and resources for farmers, farm labor contractors, farm workers, and their families on issues associated with health and work safety (pesticide safety, weather protection, and other occupational hazards) as well as overall agricultural worker family well-being. She primarily assists in the scheduling, training, and reporting of women’s health, infectious diseases, and youth safety programs at AgriSafe Network.

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/30/2023

    Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farm workers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team and effectively communicating within that team are essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Summary: Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farmworkers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team, and effectively communicating within that team is essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Intended Audience: Supervisor or Managers: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns, and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    • Define zoonotic disease and identify various modes of transmission
    • Identify a minimum of four significant zoonotic diseases affecting the production agricultural population
    • Discuss warning signs and symptoms of major zoonotic diseases which have adverse effects for reproductive health
    • Locate a minimum of three recommended educational resources for use in training an agricultural workforce

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health and Equity Director

    AgriSafe Network

    Mrs. Knesha Rose-Davison serves as the Public Health and Equity Director for AgriSafe Network. She has over 17 years of public health experience in maternal and child health, community health, health disparities, and advocacy. In May 2016, she joined AgriSafe Network as their health communications director, quickly growing into their public health programs director, where she managed employer-employee safety training for youth working in agriculture, opioid safety for health providers and agricultural workers, and women’s health topics. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) and a Master of Public Health (2006) from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine focused on rural occupational health, environmental health, and safety. She is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association, where she serves in leadership. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity, and she aligns all her work with these causes.

  • Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/01/2023

    Dr. Merendino will present the Importance of Foot Health in Agriculture in the first half of the presentation. He will address important practices and provide examples of foot health issues to take action on. Karen will finish with a presentation on her extension fieldwork with the ag/hort growers along with Dr. Merendino including a field day program in Volusia County (commercial fernery), then conclude her results from an Extension Sock Study assaying Merino Wool Socks.

    Summary: Dr. Merendino will present the Importance of Foot Health in Agriculture in the first half of the presentation. He will address important practices and provide examples of foot health issues to take action on. Karen will finish with a presentation on her extension fieldwork with the ag/hort growers along with Dr. Merendino including a field day program in Volusia County (commercial fernery), then conclude her results from an Extension Sock Study assaying Merino Wool Socks.

    Intended Audience: Agricultural/ Horticultural professionals, medical personnel, and the general public

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    1. Identify Best Management Practices for proper foot health.
    2. Identify common foot conditions that result from poor foot health.
    3. Gain knowledge on grower work boot and sock trait preferences as evidenced by actual trials and surveys

    Register Here

    Anthony Merendino, DPM

    Assistant Professor

    UF Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute

    Assistant Professor, Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, UF, UF Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute

    Dr. Merendino earned his medical degree from Barry University School of Podiatric Medicine in Miami. Following medical school, he completed his residency in podiatric surgery at Kern Hospital for Special Surgery in Warren, Michigan. His inspiration for becoming a physician started when he was young. He experienced the battle his grandparents had with the effects of diabetes, which eventually led to the loss of limbs and life. This formed his desire and focus to reduce the effects of diabetes and other diseases of the foot and ankle.

    His goal is to treat patients and educate them on the conditions they face. When his patients understand why a disease is affecting their foot and ankle, they become more involved in their care plan. Outside of medicine, he enjoys spending time with his family biking, and hiking.

    Karen Stauderman, MS

    Commercial Horticulture Agent III

    University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Services, Extension Volusia County

    Originally from Oregon, Karen moved to Florida in 1988 where she began work as a research scientist and a Commercial Horticulture agent with the University of Florida. Karen holds a dual bachelor’s degree in Plant Pathology and Horticulture from Oregon State University and a master’s in Entomology from the University of Florida. In 1995, she along with her husband, started a U-pick strawberry farm, restaurant, vineyard, and winery. She instructs on pesticide education and works directly with the Cut Foliage Greens, citrus, sports turf, and alternative crop industries for Volusia County in Central Florida.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/26/2023

    Foresters and loggers work in the most hazardous industries with high job-related injury, illness, and fatality rates. This workforce faces unique environmental exposures, ergonomic challenges, and health disparities across all ages. The last comprehensive literature review in forestry health and safety for NIOSH was completed in 2012. Under a NIOSH IPA project, AgriSafe conducted a forestry health and safety literature review for publications from 2012 to 2022. The objectives of this review were 1) uncover the health and safety issues currently facing the forestry and logging workforce, 2) identify any new trends or topics in the literature, 3) identify areas of training and health needs 4) identify healthcare access issues impacting the forestry workforce. Final results of this project will be shared with the audience. Findings in this project will contribute to NIOSH’s priorities for forestry occupational health and safety and the literature. The literature review will inform and prioritize future forestry training needs through AgriSafe’s OSHA forestry training projects.

    Summary: Foresters and loggers work in the most hazardous industries with high job-related injury, illness, and fatality rates. This workforce faces unique environmental exposures, ergonomic challenges, and health disparities across all ages. The last comprehensive literature review in forestry health and safety for NIOSH was completed in 2012. Under a NIOSH IPA project, AgriSafe conducted a forestry health and safety literature review for publications from 2012 to 2022. The objectives of this review were 1) uncover the health and safety issues currently facing the forestry and logging workforce, 2) identify any new trends or topics in the literature, 3) identify areas of training and health needs 4) identify healthcare access issues impacting the forestry workforce.  Final results of this project will be shared with the audience. Findings in this project will contribute to NIOSH’s priorities for forestry occupational health and safety and the literature. The literature review will inform and prioritize future forestry training needs through AgriSafe’s OSHA forestry training projects. 

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to understand…

    1. Summarize the findings of the literature review.
    2. Identify areas of training and health needs in health and safety for forestry workers.

    Intended Audience: This course is intended for agricultural safety/forestry professionals working in the industry, extension, academia, or safety centers and workers in forestry and logging, including logging owners and first-line supervisors/managers of forestry workers.

    Tara Haskins, DNP, MSN, RN, AHN-BC

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

  • Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/18/2023

    Veterans deal with a whole host of disabilities, traumas, and transitional issues following military service. Agriculture can serve as a solution to many veteran issues through professional training to support career goals and therapeutic activities to support overall wellness of the veteran and their families. Crosscutting programs like Heroes to Hives seek to address these multifaceted needs through professional training in beekeeping and transpersonal wellness practices within the course that seek to utilize bees and the interaction with them as modalities for positive health outcomes. In this session, we will discuss how Heroes to Hives delivers wellness opportunities and practices to their students.

    Summary: Veterans deal with a whole host of disabilities, traumas, and transitional issues following military service. Agriculture can serve as a solution to many veteran issues through professional training to support career goals and therapeutic activities to support overall wellness of the veteran and their families. Crosscutting programs like Heroes to Hives seek to address these multifaceted needs through professional training in beekeeping and transpersonal wellness practices within the course that seek to utilize bees and the interaction with them as modalities for positive health outcomes. In this session, we will discuss how Heroes to Hives delivers wellness opportunities and practices to their students.

    Intended Audience: Health Care Providers, Ag Educators, and Veteran Service Providers

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    1. Participants will learn about the Heroes to Hives program’s integrative training program.
    2. Participants will understand the value of integrating transpersonal practices into agricultural settings for wellness.
    3. Participants will learn how collaboration with the VA can lead to new wellness opportunities for veterans using VA care.
    4. Participants will learn about the USDA Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program’s Professional Development grant opportunity.

    Adam Ingrao, Ph.D., B.S.

    Co-Founder and National Director

    Heroes to Hives

    Dr. Adam Ingrao holds a B.S. in Agriculture and Plant Science from California Polytechnic State University and a Ph.D. in Entomology from Michigan State University. He is the Co-Founder and National Director for the Heroes to Hives program and an Outreach Specialist at Michigan Food and Farming Systems. Dr. Ingrao has been working in agriculture for 30 years and with honey bees professionally for 17 years, teaching beekeeping to audiences around the world. He has published numerous peer-reviewed articles on agriculture topics, is a regular contributor to Bee Culture magazine, and was most recently a co-author of the textbook Honey Bee Medicine for the Veterinary Practitioner.