Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Stepping Boldly into Tough Conversations

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Difficult conversations are something that people rarely look forward to. The reality is ignoring a situation and hoping that it will resolve itself, rarely works. Join us to learn how to confidently step into a tough conversation and promote open communication.

    Summary: Difficult conversations are something that people rarely look forward to. The reality is ignoring a situation and hoping that it will resolve itself, rarely works. Join us to learn how to confidently step into a tough conversation and promote open communication.

    Intended Audience: Anyone who wants to be more effective when faced with a tough conversation.

    Objectives: At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to...
    - Identify talking points before you start talking
    - Create a communication safe zone
    - Establish agreements and accountability

    Continuing Education is available for this webinar! The Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety offers 0.1 CEU or 1.0 contact hours of participation. This course is eligible for 1.0 CPH Recertification Credits and is sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. The following groups of professionals have been able to use these CEUs in the past; Industrial Hygiene (CIH), Certified Public Health Professional (CPH), Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Nursing (RN, LPN), Social Work (LSW), Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT), Audiology (ABA), and others. Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits.

    image
    image 

    image


    Rena Striegel, MBA

    President, Transition Point Business Advisors

    Rena is an internationally recognized business coach and consultant with more than 20 years of experience working directly with senior executives and entrepreneurs to identify and implement strategies that create growth and profitability.

    In her role as coach, strategist and facilitator, she leads client projects in the areas of Executive and business coaching, strategic planning, business planning, developing hiring strategies, and employee/leadership development.

    Rena has a passion for helping people make more money and have more fun! Her talent lies in helping business owners and executive make connections between concepts and application in order to help them achieve the level of operational excellence that allows resources to be focused on growth rather than on fixing problems.

    Her direct and honest bottom line approach has helped the leaders and management teams of international organizations like Business Network International (BNI), Xerox, Project Management Institute, Northwestern Mutual, United Way, Magna Corporation and many others improve their overall performance through clear executable strategies and higher employee contribution.

  • Zoonotic Disease and Pregnancy: A Deeper Dive (September 24, 2021)

    Contains 5 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/24/2021

    Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farm workers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team and effectively communicating within that team are essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Summary: Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farmworkers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team, and effectively communicating within that team is essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Intended Audience: Supervisor or Managers: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns, and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    • Define zoonotic disease and identify various modes of transmission
    • Identify a minimum of four significant zoonotic diseases affecting the production agricultural population
    • Discuss warning signs and symptoms of major zoonotic diseases which have adverse effects for reproductive health
    • Locate a minimum of three recommended educational resources for use in training an agricultural workforce

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health Program Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Public Health Program Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Best PPE to Protect Your Lungs (September 23, 2021)

    Contains 10 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/31/2021

    Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge. Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one-hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education.

    Summary: Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge. Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one-hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education.

    Intended Audience: The primary audience for this program will be rural health care providers, educators, and agribusiness safety managers

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    • List at least three sources of common agricultural respiratory hazards
    • Identify appropriate respiratory protection equipment for women working in agriculture
    • Access a minimum of three evidence-based resources for use in respiratory health and safety education for women working in agricultural environments.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa. She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training. From 1997 to 2013, she provided agricultural occupational health services and program development for the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety.

  • Food in the Field

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    With 18+ hour workdays, the stress of the weather, dealing with markets and policies, and limited nutritious, one-handed dining options, it is easy to put healthy eating on the back burner during the busy seasons of harvest and planting. Food in the Field is an online nutrition program seeking to nutritiously feed those who feed us in the field and everywhere in between. This webinar will cover valuable tools to help you plan ahead for the busy seasons as well as research supporting the role of nutrition in mental health and wellbeing.

    Summary: With 18+ hour workdays, the stress of the weather, dealing with markets and policies, and limited nutritious, one-handed dining options, it is easy to put healthy eating on the back burner during the busy seasons of harvest and planting. Food in the Field is an online nutrition program seeking to nutritiously feed those who feed us in the field and everywhere in between. This webinar will cover valuable tools to help you plan ahead for the busy seasons as well as research supporting the role of nutrition in mental health and wellbeing.

    Intended Audience: Farmers and their families, anyone interested in learning about a healthy eating pattern

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to….

    • Identify how to implement small shifts towards a healthy eating pattern
    • Utilize tools to create a healthy food environment at home and during the busy seasons of harvest and planting
    • Understand the research supporting diet’s role in reducing depression symptoms


    image

    Tara Dunker, MS, RD

    Food, Nutrition, and Health Extension Educator – Nebraska Extension

    With over seven years of experience as a practicing registered dietitian, Tara has contributed to the field in various professional capacities. Previously, she worked for the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) as the state project coordinator for after-school nutrition, fitness & cooking program funded by a Children, Youth, and Families At-Risk (CYFAR) grant through the 4-H Youth Development Department at UNL. Her current role, however, is Extension Educator in Gage County covering the areas of food, nutrition, and health with a focus on healthy youth and families, food access, local food systems, and food safety. Outside of Gage County, her accountability region includes Jefferson, Johnson, Nemaha, Pawnee, Richardson, and Saline counties. She also serves in a volunteer capacity with the Nebraska Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics, working to advance the profession.

    Hannah Guenther, MA

    Food, Nutrition, and Health Extension Educator – Nebraska Extension

    Hannah Guenther is a Food, Nutrition, and Health Extension Educator for the University of Nebraska – Lincoln. Hannah began her career in Extension in June 2018 after leaving her Family and Consumer Science classroom. She has a degree in Dietetics from the University of Nebraska – Lincoln and a Master’s degree in Education from the University of Nebraska – Kearney. Although raised a city girl, Hannah is quickly adjusting to life on the farm and now dedicates a majority of her time on culinary education programs and work to helping the agriculture community make nutritious choices. Hannah is married to Adam Guenther and they have a 7-year-old daughter named Charlotte. They currently reside on a feedlot outside of West Point. 

  • A Look at Stress and Mental Health During COVID-19 and the Impacts to Farmers and Other Sectors

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Hurricane Michael was the worst agriculture disaster in Georgia's history. The Department of Agriculture partnered with the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities and the Georgia Department of Public Health to develop outreach and educational materials to support farmer mental health in the state. This work continued during COVID-19. The Georgia Food and Feed Rapid Response Team (GA RRT) and partner agencies created a COVID-19 Food, Agriculture, and Hospitality Stress Workgroup to assess the impacts of stress and mental health across the nation through 2 online surveys. This presentation will cover partnership building, the evolution of farmer crisis resources in Georgia, and the development of outreach initiatives to inform food, agriculture, hospitality workers, and the public about the importance of the ABCs of Compassion Fatigue that includes awareness, balance, and connections.

    Summary: Hurricane Michael was the worst agriculture disaster in Georgia's history. The Department of Agriculture partnered with the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities and the Georgia Department of Public Health to develop outreach and educational materials to support farmer mental health in the state. This work continued during COVID-19. The Georgia Food and Feed Rapid Response Team (GA RRT) and partner agencies created a COVID-19 Food, Agriculture, and Hospitality Stress Workgroup to assess the impacts of stress and mental health across the nation through 2 online surveys. This presentation will cover partnership building, the evolution of farmer crisis resources in Georgia, and the development of outreach initiatives to inform food, agriculture, hospitality workers, and the public about the importance of the ABCs of Compassion Fatigue that includes awareness, balance, and connections.

    Intended Audience: Farmers, Public Health, Medical Providers (human and animal health), Emergency Managers, NGO, and General Public

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to….

    • Understand how to build partnerships for farmer mental health
    • Understand COVID-19 Stress and Mental Health Workgroup project timeline
    • Recognize Behavioral and Mental Health impacts to farmers and other sectors during COVID-19
    • Identify Farmer Stress and Mental Health resources and outreach materials

    Continuing Education is available for this webinar! The Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety offers 0.1 CEU or 1.0 contact hours of participation. This course is eligible for 1.0 CPH Recertification Credits and is sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. The following groups of professionals have been able to use these CEUs in the past; Industrial Hygiene (CIH), Certified Public Health Professional (CPH), Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Nursing (RN, LPN), Social Work (LSW), Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT), Audiology (ABA), and others. Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits.

    image
    image 


    image

    Venessa Sims, MEP, GA-CEM, BA Psychology,

    Director of Emergency Management, Georgia Department of Agriculture

    Venessa A. Sims, MEP, GA-CEM is the Director of Emergency Management and Asst. Food and Feed Rapid Response Team (GA RRT) Program Manager for the Georgia Department of Agriculture.  Venessa supports emergency management and homeland security duties for the food and agriculture sector in Georgia.  She served as Unified Commander for the 2020 Final Four and Super Bowl LIII Food Defense Branch and as a representative of the Super Bowl LIII Logistics Committee.  Venessa serves on the FDA FSMA Intentional Adulteration Workgroup as a state representative, serves as the Georgia representative for the Southern Animal and Agriculture Disaster Response Alliance (SAADRA), and serves as the Past President for the National Alliance of State Animal and Agriculture Emergency Programs (NASAAEP).  She is a member of the Heritage Emergency Response Alliance (HERA).  Venessa also serves as a liaison as the Emergency Support Function (ESF) 11 Coordinator for the state of Georgia and coordinates response activities at the State Operations Center (SOC) for ESF 11 during activations, ESF 11 planning, and exercise support activities, and ESF 11 recovery endeavors.  Venessa chairs the Georgia Animal Coordination Group during disasters.  She served as a member of the Georgia Agriculture Recovery Task Force for Hurricane Michael, the worst agriculture disaster in Georgia history and has chaired stress and mental health education initiatives for the food and agriculture sectors.  Venessa is the Training & Exercise Coordinator for the Department where she works collaboratively with local, state, federal, and private sector partners to plan, train and implement exercises related to food and agriculture and public health.  She has served as Exercise Director, Planner, Player, Evaluator, Actor, After Action Report and Improvement Plan Point of Contact for Super Bowl LIII, Georgia Public Library Service, Cobb County Libraries, HERA, metro-Atlanta UASI, DOD, GEMA, FDA, CDC, Biowatch, food and agriculture, water, radiological, public health, and laboratory exercises.  Ms. Sims regularly presents at local, state, and national events on an array of topics related to food and agriculture planning, response, and recovery initiatives. 

  • Pediatric Farm-Related Injuries: Safeguarding Children Who Visit or Live on Farms

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Injuries are the most common cause of death for children and adolescents, and farms and ranches present many unique hazards to youth. During this presentation, we will discuss many of these including augers, grain bins, gravity boxes, tractors, power take-offs (PTOs), manure pits, chemical exposures, animals, and gasoline-powered pressure sprayers. One of the most common causes of serious injuries and deaths to youth on farms and ranches are the use of off-road vehicles (ORVs) like all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), utility task vehicles (UTVs), and recreational off-highway vehicles (ROVs). The safety concerns and prevention strategies related to ORVs will be a featured segment of the presentation. A general overview of how the growth and development of youth affect the risk of injury, and the role healthcare providers can assume to impact injury prevention will be discussed.

    Summary: Injuries are the most common cause of death for children and adolescents, and farms and ranches present many unique hazards to youth. During this presentation, we will discuss many of these including augers, grain bins, gravity boxes, tractors, power take-offs (PTOs), manure pits, chemical exposures, animals, and gasoline-powered pressure sprayers. One of the most common causes of serious injuries and deaths to youth on farms and ranches are the use of off-road vehicles (ORVs) like all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), utility task vehicles (UTVs), and recreational off-highway vehicles (ROVs). The safety concerns and prevention strategies related to ORVs will be a featured segment of the presentation. A general overview of how the growth and development of youth affect the risk of injury, and the role healthcare providers can assume to impact injury prevention will be discussed.

    Intended Audience: Anyone working with youth in agriculture, and rural healthcare providers

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    • Name at least four specific safety hazards on farms and express how one might counsel families to prevent injuries from those hazards.
    • Describe what a PTO is and how one avoids injuries associated with them.
    • State at least two ways to prevent injury when operating tractors.
    • Convey how one would attempt the rescue of someone caught in a grain bin, or manage an extremity caught in an auger.
    • Explain at least three reasons why off-road vehicles like all-terrain vehicles and utility task vehicles are not designed to be used on roads.
    image

    Charles Jennissen, MD

    Clinical Professor, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine

    Charles Jennissen, MD, is a pediatric emergency medicine physician and a Clinical Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. Dr. Jennissen grew up on a dairy farm in central Minnesota.  This plays a large part in his interest in safety and injury prevention, particularly regarding children and teens, and those who work and live on farms.  Most of his research activities have addressed injury-related issues, especially those involving off-road vehicles. Dr. Jennissen is very active in the Iowa ATV Safety Taskforce and is a member of a national coalition led by the Consumer Federation of America that has been working to inform the public and governing officials of the dangers of off-road vehicles on public roads. He has been an advisory board member of I-CASH (Iowa Center for Agricultural Safety and Health) for 22 years. He is proud to have received the SAFE KIDS Iowa “People Who Make a Difference” Award in 2006.

  • Developing and Implementing a Pilot Agricultural Community Suicide Prevention Program for Farmers and Farm Families

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This presentation describes a pilot community-based suicide prevention program. Eighteen trainers from various farmer-connected groups such as commodity groups, equipment dealers, farm safety trainers, teachers, ministers, and rural health nurses obtained credentials as QPR (Question-Persuade-Refer) trainers. Over 450 persons were trained from these constituent groups in an 8-month period of time using training materials customized for the farming community. Using a Community of Practice framework challenges and successes in establishing mutual engagement, joint enterprise, a shared repertoire, and meaning in practice. Program revisions and the next steps forward are discussed.

    Summary: This presentation describes a pilot community-based suicide prevention program. Eighteen trainers from various farmer-connected groups such as commodity groups, equipment dealers, farm safety trainers, teachers, ministers, and rural health nurses obtained credentials as QPR (Question-Persuade-Refer) trainers. Over 450 persons were trained from these constituent groups in an 8-month period of time using training materials customized for the farming community. Using a Community of Practice framework challenges and successes in establishing mutual engagement, joint enterprise, a shared repertoire, and meaning in practice. Program revisions and the next steps forward are discussed.

    Intended Audience: Agricultural Safety & Health Professionals, Rural Community healthcare workers, social service professionals, Agricultural Extension

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to….

    • Identify unique emotional stressors for farmers and farm families
    • Understand the basic tenets and approach of the QPR Suicide Prevention Program and adaptions that are appropriate for implementation with farmers and farm families
    • Understand useful strategies for identifying community partners to build coalitions to support farmer and farm families to access and utilize support services.
    • Identify elements of the Community of Practice framework for application to the development of community-based farmer mental health support networks.
    image

    Joan M. Mazur, PhD

    Professor, Southeast Center for Agriculture Health and Injury Prevention, University of Kentucky

    Joan M. Mazur, Ph.D. is Professor of Instructional Systems Design in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction where she also serves as a Director of the Digital Learning & Design P-20 Innovation Lab. Her research is primarily interdisciplinary and has focused on narrative forms of instruction, mediating technologies and inquiry, and recently on teacher professional development and coaching for innovative classroom learning technology as part of the P-20 Innovation Initiative. She teaches graduate classes in digital gaming, social media design, technology integration in the secondary schools and mixed methods research. She has collaborated with the Colleges of Engineering, Agriculture, Public Health, and Arts and Sciences and numerous public school districts on various projects, funded by NSF, NIOSH, DoDEA and various private foundations including BellSouth and James Graham Brown.

    Joan began at UK in 1993 after receiving her doctoral degree from Cornell University in Curriculum & Instruction. Mazur lives with her husband on their farm in Willisburg in Washington County.

  • Rural Road Safety: A Shared Responsibility

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Tractors have traditionally been a leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries on and around farms and ranches. Other agricultural vehicles are adding to this trend. This webinar will cover the basic hazards associated with agricultural tractors and agricultural vehicles and how to prevent injuries from these hazards.

    Summary: Rural roads play an important role in moving people and goods in the U.S., but all too often, crashes occur, and fatalities happen. These fatalities are not just statistics, but are our loved ones and community members, so how do we proactively work to reach zero? In this webinar, we will examine the concept that rural road safety is a shared responsibility, discuss safety culture, and delve into some strategies that can be used to improve safety for all rural road users. You will leave this webinar with actions you as an individual can take to make a difference.

    Intended Audience: The attendees for National Farm Safety and Health Week including farmers, rural nurse practitioners, and rural clinicians.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to….

    • Identify the importance of vision zero for rural areas
    • Recognize effective strategies being used in rural areas
    • Describe how you as an individual can support safety initiatives


    image

    Jaime Sullivan, P.E.

    Director, National Center for Rural Road Safety

    Jaime is a Senior Research Engineer for the Western Transportation Institute (WTI) at Montana State University with 20 years of experience. Her focus is in applied rural safety and operations research for Local and State Departments of Transportation and Public Lands such as the National Park Service. She currently serves as the Director for the National Center for Rural Road Safety, the program manager for the Public Lands Transportation Fellows Program, and the chair of the new TRB Rural Transportation Issues Coordination Council (A0040C). 

  • What’s New in Tractor and Agricultural Vehicle Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Tractors have traditionally been a leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries on and around farms and ranches. Other agricultural vehicles are adding to this trend. This webinar will cover the basic hazards associated with agricultural tractors and agricultural vehicles and how to prevent injuries from these hazards.

    Summary: Tractors have traditionally been a leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries on and around farms and ranches. Other agricultural vehicles are adding to this trend. This webinar will cover the basic hazards associated with agricultural tractors and agricultural vehicles and how to prevent injuries from these hazards.

    Intended Audience: Safety professionals, educators, students, Ag workers, Ag business employees, and healthcare workers

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to….

    • Understand the hazards associated with agricultural tractors and vehicles.
    • Learn ways to reduce the hazards associated with agricultural tractors and vehicles.
    • Learn where to find resources for teaching and training on the topic of agricultural tractors and vehicle safety.


    image

    Aaron M. Yoder, PhD

    Associate Professor, Environmental, Agricultural and Occupational Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Extension - Biological Systems Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

    Aaron Yoder grew up in central Pennsylvania where he spent time working on his grandfather's farm. He graduated from Penn State University with a BS and MS in Agricultural Systems Management and Environmental Pollution Control, respectively. He went on to complete a Ph.D. from Purdue University in Agricultural and Biological Engineering where he focused on the ergonomic evaluation of assistive technology for AgrAbility clients. Aaron is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental, Agricultural, and Occupational Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and works with projects through the NIOSH-funded Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health. He is the president of the International Society for Agricultural Safety and Health and serves on the Board of Directors of the Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America and Progressive Agriculture Foundation. Dr. Yoder also maintains leadership roles in the eXtension.org/AgSafety Community of Practice, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, and the USDA NCERA197 Committee for establishing priorities at Land Grant University for agricultural safety and health research and education programs. 

  • Rooted in Facts: COVID-19 Vaccines (August 25, 2021)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The coronavirus pandemic has challenged our way of thinking, living and interacting. Get the information you need to make decisions for yourself and your family. This is a discussion addressing common questions about COVID-19 vaccines. Watch the recording of this neighbor-to-neighbor virtual discussion to sort through information concerning the COVID-19 vaccines. This presentation took place on August 25th at noon Central with invited speaker Fred Gerr, MD.

    The coronavirus pandemic has challenged our way of thinking, living and interacting. Get the information you need to make decisions for yourself and your family. This is a discussion addressing common questions about COVID-19 vaccines.  Watch the recording of this neighbor-to-neighbor virtual discussion to sort through information concerning the COVID-19 vaccines. This presentation took place on August 25th at noon Central with invited speaker Fred Gerr, MD.

    Intended Audience: Agricultural Producers & Workers, Individuals living in rural areas, or any individuals that would like to learn more about COVID-19 vaccine confidence

    Fred Gerr, MD

    Dr. Gerr has been practicing occupational medicine and internal medicine for 35 years. He is currently professor emeritus of Occupational and Environmental Health and Epidemiology at the University of Iowa College of Public Health and professor emeritus of Internal Medicine in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Occupational Medicine at the Carver College of Medicine at the University of Iowa. Dr. Gerr has served as program director of the Occupational Medicine Residency Training Program at the Rollins College of Public Health at Emory University and at the University of Iowa. He has provided technical assistance for the prevention of COVID-19 infection to the University of Iowa, the Supreme Court of the State of Iowa, the Theater Arts Program at Coe College, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Dr. Gerr is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Preventive Medicine.