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  • Aging and Parkinson's Disease in Agriculture (April 13, 2021)

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Parkinson's disease impacts over one million people living in the United States. People living in rural areas may not have access to specialists and getting diagnosis may be difficult. Rural health care providers and agricultural professionals need to develop an awareness of this neurodegenerative disorder and understand the effects on agricultural work. Participants will learn about rural specific resources, safety screening for aspects of agricultural work, tips to maximize farmer functioning, and communication strategies with farm families.

    Summary: Parkinson's disease impacts over one million people living in the United States. People living in rural areas may not have access to specialists and getting diagnosis may be difficult. Rural health care providers and agricultural professionals need to develop an awareness of this neurodegenerative disorder and understand the effects on agricultural work. Participants will learn about rural specific resources, safety screening for aspects of agricultural work, tips to maximize farmer functioning, and communication strategies with farm families.

    Objectives: At the end of this presentation, learners will be able to...

    • Understand the impact of aging on the farming workforce
    • Translate relevant strategies when interacting with people living with Parkinson’s that work in agricultural production
    • Understand why an in-home engagement is an important approach to consider for rural individuals with Parkinson disease
    • Use evidenced-based screening tools to address safety and foster communication for individuals with movement disorders working in agriculture

    Intended Audience: This course is intended for healthcare professionals, agricultural and agribusiness professionals, people engaged in agricultural work and families that encounter aging individuals living with movement disorders like Parkinson’s. Anyone working with aging producers in rural America and interested in preserving their safety and function will find value in this educational offering.

    Continuing Education:

    The Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety offers 0.1 CEU or 1.0 contact hours of participation. This course is eligible for 1.0 CPH Recertification Credits and is sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits. The following groups of professionals have been able to use these CEUs in the past; Industrial Hygiene (CIH), Certified Public Health Professional(CPH), Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Nursing (RN, LPN), Social Work (LSW), Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT), Audiology (ABA), and others.  Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits.

    NP’s and RN’s will gain the knowledge and understanding regarding aging in agriculture and Parkinson’s disease impact on agricultural work, driving safety, rural exercise programs as strategies to improve client outcomes.

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    This webinar is supported by:

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    Funded under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012345 with the University of North Texas Health Science Center - Gibson D. Lewis Library, and awarded by the DHHS, NIH, National Library of Medicine.

    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

    Amy Mullins, APRN, MSN, FNP-BC

    Family Nurse Practitioner, UT Health East Texas Neurological Institute

    Amy Mullins is a board-certified family nurse practitioner at the UT Health East Texas Neurological Institute where she cares for patients with Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and other movement disorders. She holds a Master of Science in Nursing from Southeast Missouri State University and is currently completing her Doctorate in Nursing Practice at University of Texas at Tyler. Amy is a certified Geriatric Nurse Generalist and Dementia care and Staff Educator. Her clinical practice places an emphasis on communication. "I try to develop a relationship where I'm 100 percent approachable - there's nothing you can't ask me."

    Averi Olson, OTS

    Averi Olson comes from a 4th generation farming family in North Dakota and will be receiving her doctorate in occupational therapy from the University of Mary this coming April 2021. Averi is a third-year doctoral student who is currently completing her capstone project on aging throughout agriculture with UMASH. Over the past year, she has completed her clinical hours in acute care, outpatient, and assisted living settings in Eastern North Dakota and Western Minnesota. Along with a farming background, Averi has a high interest in the aging population, workplace modification, adaptive strategies, the promotion of health and wellness. Upon graduation, she plans to remain in the Upper Midwest and provide occupational therapy services to rural areas. 

    Kristin Pickett, PhD, OT

    Assistant Professor in the Occupational Therapy Program in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison

    Dr. Kristin Pickett is an Assistant Professor in the Occupational Therapy Program in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She holds a B.S. in Biology from the University of Wisconsin–Platteville and Master and Doctoral degrees from the University of Minnesota–Twin Cities. Dr. Pickett’s doctoral work focused on the use of f-MRI to examine individuals with idiopathic focal hand dystonia. She completed a postdoctoral experience in the Physical Therapy and Movement Disorders Program in the Department of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Dr. Pickett’s current focus is on the use of collaborative and community-based research methods aimed at positively impacting meaningful health outcomes for older adults, especially those with Parkinson disease, who have limited access to effective forms of physical activity.

  • Best PPE to Protect Your Lungs (March 31, 2021)

    Contains 10 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/31/2021

    Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge. Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education

    Summary:  Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge.  Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education
    Intended audience: The primary audience for this program will be rural health care providers, educators, and agribusiness safety managers
    Objectives (Focus areas): At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to: 
    1. List at least three sources of common agricultural respiratory hazards 
    2. Identify appropriate respiratory protection equipment for women working in agriculture 
    3. Access a minimum of three evidence- based resources for use in respiratory health and safety education for women working in agricultural environments.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte Halverson is an occupational health nurse for the AgriSafe Network and serves as the network’s Clinical Director. In that capacity, she researches, develops resources, and presents webinar and in person educational sessions on a variety of health and safety topics specific to the agricultural workforce. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Anhydrous Ammonia Safety for Farmworkers (March 31, 2021)

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/31/2021

    Anhydrous ammonia (NH3) is an effective nitrogen crop fertilizer used throughout the Midwest and beyond. Anhydrous ammonia is potentially dangerous, as it seeks water from the nearest source, which may be the human body – especially the eyes, lungs, and skin because of their high moisture content. Few problems occur when anhydrous ammonia is handled properly and applied as intended. However, it is important for all individuals working with this type of fertilizer to understand the potential health risks, necessary safety precautions, and proper response in the event of an exposure.

    Summary: Anhydrous ammonia (NH3) is an effective nitrogen crop fertilizer used throughout the Midwest and beyond.  Anhydrous ammonia is potentially dangerous, as it seeks water from the nearest source, which may be the human body – especially the eyes, lungs, and skin because of their high moisture content.  Few problems occur when anhydrous ammonia is handled properly and applied as intended.  However, it is important for all individuals working with this type of fertilizer to understand the potential health risks, necessary safety precautions, and proper response in the event of an exposure.

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is one of the last lines of defense for workers against Anhydrous Ammonia injuries. Women in all industries, including agriculture, have trouble finding and purchasing respiratory protective equipment that fits and is safe and comfortable wear. The National Safety Council, in a 2019 publication of Safety and Health, reported OSHA documentation indicating the lack of a full range of PPE, as well as, employers’ limited knowledge of PPE designed for women – as some of the reasons for the difficulty.  Focus of the training is on anhydrous ammonia safety during transport and application, including the anatomy of the nurse tank and toolbar, safety inspection processes, hitching and unhitching safety, personal protective equipment (PPE), rural roadway safety, and first aid/emergency procedures.  Hazard communication and emergency action plans will also be addressed.

    Intended Audience: Farm/Ranch owner and operators, health and safety professionals, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the conclusion of the program, participants will be able to...

    • Identify the anatomy of a nurse tank and toolbar
    • Choose appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE)
    • Make use of a safety inspection process
    • Describe safety measures to follow during anhydrous transport and application
    • Apply rural roadway safety measures
    • Describe hitching and unhitching safety
    • Plan and utilize basic first aid/emergency procedures
    • Locate hazard communication plan and emergency action plan resources

    This material was produced under grant number SH-99084-SH0 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Addressing Military Needs in Agriculture (March 17, 2021)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Veterans have a long history of service to our country through military service and through agriculture. The 2017 USDA report added a new special category of producers: “Producers with Military Service”. This report identified that 370,019 men and women agriculture producers claimed the title of US veteran, with 294,974 of them having spent more than 10 years on their farm. Recently much attention has highlighted veterans’ participation in farming. With this new attention, it is important to understand the unique characteristics and needs of those veterans

    Summary: Veterans have a long history of service to our country through military service and through agriculture. The 2017 USDA report added a new special category of producers: “Producers with Military Service”. This report identified that 370,019 men and women agriculture producers claimed the title of US veteran, with 294,974 of them having spent more than 10 years on their farm. Recently much attention has highlighted veterans’ participation in farming. With this new attention, it is important to understand the unique characteristics and needs of those veterans. 

    Registered nurses will be able address the needs of veteran farmers with a clearer understanding of the veteran experience compounded by the stress of farming and link veteran farmers to importance resources that support and build provider-client relationships and client resilience

    Objectives:
    The learner will be able to:

    • Outline the unique challenges that veterans face when returning from service to build a career in agriculture.
    • Utilize resources that are available to veterans that provide support for their unique challenges.

    Intended Audience
    All healthcare professionals, health and safety professionals, veteran healthcare administrators, farm/ranch owner and operators, public health, agricultural professionals working in academia, business or production, organizations working with veteran farmers, veterans and veteran groups. 


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    Continuing Nursing Education Information:
    • Faculty and planners of this educational activity have disclosed that they have NO conflicts of interests related to this program.
    • There will be NO discussion of off-label use of products for purposes other than what was approved by the FDA.
    • This program has NO commercial support
    • To receive the 1.0 contact hours, you must watch the entire program, complete and pass the post-test, complete the post-program evaluation.

    ​Dr. Crystal Kyle

    Biological Science Specialist in the Institute of Youth, Family, and Community (IYFC)

    Dr. Crystal Kyle serves as a Biological Science Specialist in the Institute of Youth, Family, and Community (IYFC). She provides programmatic grant support to competitive and non-competitive grant programs. As a military veteran who farms, one of her emphasis is on Military and Veteran Programs and scholarships, such as AgVet and Military Reimbursables. These include Military REACH, Military Family Learning Network, Virtual Lab School, Family Readiness, Yellow Ribbon, Substance Abuse, and Early Learning collaborations with Department of Defense. Other areas include Small and Medium Farm grants under Small Business Innovation Research. Dr. Kyle provides assistance in Beginner Farmer and Rancher, AgrAbility, 4-H, and 1890s Programs.  She holds a PhD in Agricultural, leadership and community development from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

  • AgriSafe Nurse Scholar Program

    Contains 78 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/01/2021

    The AgriSafe Nurse Scholar program is a distance learning opportunity available to rural nurses. Education and training, provided by experienced health & safety educators will enable rural nurses to increase their knowledge base in prevention, identification and assessment of diseases related to agricultural work exposures. Classes are in the form of webinars that can be viewed OnDemand. Nurses who complete this course will be eligible for 20 hours of continuing nursing education.

    The AgriSafe Nurse Scholar program is a distance learning opportunity available to rural nurses, nurse practitioners, and nurse educators. Education and training, provided by experienced health & safety educators will enable rural nurses to increase their knowledge base in prevention, identification and assessment of diseases related to agricultural work exposures. Nurses who complete this course will be eligible for 20 hours of continuing nursing education provided by the University of Louisiana Lafayette.

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    The Nurse Scholar program provides flexibility in scheduling out time to earn your CNE contact hours. Classes are in the form of webinars that can be viewed OnDemand (your own time). If you would like to see a list of all webinar topics, click on the course objectives tab.

    The AgriSafe Nurse Scholar course including all content, testing, and evaluation must be completed by March 1, 2022.

    Email nursescholar@agrisafe.org with any questions.

    This program is supported by:

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    To see a list of the 2020 Nurse Scholar topic titles and course objectives for each presentation: 
  • Talking to Farmers About Pain (Continuing Education: Multiple Disciplines)

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    The occupational hazards that farmers face put them at greater risk for acute and chronic pain as a result of ergonomic repetition, accident, or surgical procedure. Addressing specific occupational sources of pain and what activities the pain inhibits are crucial to improving treatment. This module will focus on how to transform the conversation between provider and patient to improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction.

    The occupational hazards that farmers face put them at greater risk for acute and chronic pain as a result of ergonomic repetition, accident, or surgical procedure. Addressing specific occupational sources of pain and what activities the pain inhibits are crucial to improving treatment. This module will focus on how to transform the conversation between provider and patient to improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction.
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1.  Understand the prevalence of occupational hazards amongst farming occupations.
    2.  Recognize occupational implications as they relate to acute and chronic pain.
    3.  Gain strategies to improve provider-patient conversations about occupational farmer pain.
    4.  Identify patient resources to aid in facilitating candid discussion about pain.
    Sponsored by:

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    This project was supported by the FY17 USDA NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant # 2017-46100-27225 and the FY18 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants (ROTA) # TI-18-022

    Continuing Health Professional Education is available for this webinar for free to licensed health care providers in the state of Mississippi. For health care providers outside of Mississippi, the continuing education is available for $40 per CE hour.

    Physician- AMA- The University of Mississippi School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Mississippi School of Medicine designates this e-learning activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the educational activity.

    Dental- ADA CERP – American Dental Association Continuing Education Recognition Program. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider. ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry designates this activity for 1.0 continuing education credits.

    Nursing- The University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing is approved as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by The Mississippi Nurses Foundation, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. As an approved provider, the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing awards this activity 1.0 contact hour(s).

    Social Work- This organization The University of Mississippi Medical Center provider number SWB 120016 is approved as a provider for continuing education by the Mississippi Board of Examiners and Marriage & Family Therapists; Approval Period: 1/15/2020 through 1/15/2022 Social workers will receive 1.0 continuing education clock hours in participating in this course General.

    Pharmacy- The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. Upon successful completion of this activity, seminar registrants will have continuing pharmacy education credit posted to their MyCPE Monitor (www.mycpemonitor.net). This seminar has been approved for (1.0 CEUs) by the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, Division of Pharmacy Professional Development. ACPE number: 0032-999-19-076-H01-P

    CHPE- This activity is approved by the University of Mississippi Medical Center Division of Continuing Health Professional Education for a maximum of 1.0 contact hours.

    Emergency Medical Services- This offering has been approved for 1.0 EMS continuing education credit by the Mississippi Bureau of Emergency Medical Services.

    For more information on courses and continuing education, please visit- https://learning.agrisafe.org/opioid-misuse-prevention

    Alison Hartman, DPT, CF-L1

    Consulting PT, DPT, CF-L1 Pro-Activity North Carolina

    Clinically trained as a Doctor of Physical Therapy, Ali harbors a deep appreciation for the human body and the resilience it holds. Unlike traditional rehabilitation professionals, Ali spends the majority of her time outside of the clinic walls, embedding herself within working populations to maximize the health, well-being, and performance of groups and individuals while leveraging her unique experience in workplace prevention and health promotion. She has completed advanced certifications in Applied Prevention and Health Promotion Therapies, and residency at Pro-Activity, a human achievement company that has specialized in workplace prevention and health promotion with industrialized workforces for the pasts 20 years. Ali was recently named managing partner of Pro-Activity’s North Carolina field office. 

    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

  • Tools for Healthcare Professionals Working in Agricultural Communities (February 19, 2021)

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    In this webinar, attendees will learn about tools they can make use to enhance healthcare services for their farming and ranching patients. Alex Cavanaugh from the Rural Health Information Hub (RHIhub) will provide a general overview of services including: Rural Response Issue Guides for COVID-19, Farmer Mental Health and Suicide Prevention resources, and the Agricultural Health and Safety Topic Guide. Sarah Dauterive of AgriSafe Network will introduce MedlinePlus and its uses for healthcare professionals.

    Summary: In this webinar, attendees will learn about tools they can make use to enhance healthcare services for their farming and ranching patients. Alex Cavanaugh from the Rural Health Information Hub (RHIhub) will provide a general overview of services including: Rural Response Issue Guides for COVID-19, Farmer Mental Health and Suicide Prevention resources, and the Agricultural Health and Safety Topic Guide. Sarah Dauterive of AgriSafe Network will introduce MedlinePlus and its uses for healthcare professionals.

    Objectives: At the conclusion of the program, participants will be able to...

    1. Recognize RHIhub as a resource for understanding rural health and Ag issues
    2. Navigate the RHIhub for specific materials to respond to rural health needs
    3. Increase understanding of MedlinePLus features and how to use them

    Intended Audience: Healthcare Professionals working with farmers and ranchers

    Funded under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012345 with the University of North Texas Health Science Center - Gibson D. Lewis Library, and awarded by the DHHS, NIH, National Library of Medicine.

    Alex Cavanaugh, MA

    Information Specialist, Rural Health Information Hub

    Alex Cavanaugh is an information specialist for the Rural Health Information Hub (RHIhub). In this position, he writes and maintains topic and state guides, adds new resources to the RHIhub website, and provides customized assistance through the Resource and Referral Service. He earned both a bachelor of arts and master of arts degrees in English from the University of North Dakota. He also holds a graduate certificate in nonprofit management from the University of Oregon and is currently working toward a PhD in English.

    Sarah Dauterive, MLIS

    Web Technologies Specialist, AgriSafe Network

    Sarah is the Web Technologies Librarian for AgriSafe Network. She is the project lead for the AgriSafe Health Hub, AgriSafe’s database of health information and services for the agricultural community. Through the Health Hub and her work at AgriSafe, Sarah connects the AgriSafe community with quality health information, services, and tools. She has a bachelor of arts degree in History from Mississippi State University and a Master of Library and Information Studies degree from the University of Alabama.

  • (Spanish Captions) Dispelling Misinformation about the COVID19 Vaccine: What Agricultural Producers Need to Know (February 12, 2021)

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are very effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Now that there are authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, accurate vaccine information is critical. COVID-19 vaccination will be an important tool to help stop the pandemic. None of the COVID-19 vaccines contain the live virus that causes COVID-19 so a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19. While more COVID-19 vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible, routine processes and procedures remain in place to ensure the safety of any vaccine that is authorized or approved for use. Safety is a top priority, and there are many reasons to get vaccinated. Dr. Lisa Morici will talk about how the vaccines have been developed, the safety and efficacy information from clinical trials, and why vaccination works to help stop the spread of COVID-19. Natalie Roy will explain why those who work in agriculture are considered essential workers and may receive prioritization in accessing the vaccine. Please join us in this important webinar so together we can reduce the spread of misinformation and help agricultural communities access the Covid-19 vaccine.

    Summary: Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are very effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Now that there are authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, accurate vaccine information is critical. COVID-19 vaccination will be an important tool to help stop the pandemic. While more COVID-19 vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible, routine processes and procedures remain in place to ensure the safety of any vaccine that is authorized or approved for use. Safety is a top priority, and there are many reasons to get vaccinated.

    Dr. Lisa Morici will talk about how the vaccines have been developed, the safety and efficacy information from clinical trials, and why vaccination works to help stop the spread of COVID-19. Natalie Roy will explain why those who work in agriculture are considered essential workers and may receive prioritization in accessing the vaccine. Please join us in this important webinar so together we can reduce the spread of misinformation and help agricultural communities access the Covid-19 vaccine.

    Intended Audience: Agriculture producers, safety and health professionals, health care providers, other people working in agriculture.

    Funded under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012345 with the University of North Texas Health Science Center - Gibson D. Lewis Library, and awarded by the DHHS, NIH, National Library of Medicine.

    Lisa Morici, PhD

    Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tulane University

    Tulane University

    Dr. Lisa Morici is a tenured Associate Professor in the Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology at Tulane University School of Medicine. Her research program focuses on the development of next generation vaccines for biodefense and emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases. Dr. Morici has successfully moved candidate vaccines from the discovery stage to planned phase 1 clinical trials. Her vaccine research program is currently supported by the National Institutes of Health and the Dept. of Defense.

    Natalie Roy, MPH

    AgriSafe Executive Director

    As Executive Director of AgriSafe for over twenty years, Natalie Roy utilizes her public health training to improve the quality of health care offered to farm families. Natalie holds a Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She is pleased to work in the area of agricultural health as it relates to her experience growing up on a farm in Canterbury New Hampshire.

  • Dispelling Misinformation about the COVID19 Vaccine: What Agricultural Producers Need to Know (February 12, 2021)

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are very effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Now that there are authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, accurate vaccine information is critical. COVID-19 vaccination will be an important tool to help stop the pandemic. None of the COVID-19 vaccines contain the live virus that causes COVID-19 so a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19. While more COVID-19 vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible, routine processes and procedures remain in place to ensure the safety of any vaccine that is authorized or approved for use. Safety is a top priority, and there are many reasons to get vaccinated. Dr. Lisa Morici will talk about how the vaccines have been developed, the safety and efficacy information from clinical trials, and why vaccination works to help stop the spread of COVID-19. Natalie Roy will explain why those who work in agriculture are considered essential workers and may receive prioritization in accessing the vaccine. Please join us in this important webinar so together we can reduce the spread of misinformation and help agricultural communities access the Covid-19 vaccine.

    Summary: Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are very effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Now that there are authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, accurate vaccine information is critical. COVID-19 vaccination will be an important tool to help stop the pandemic. While more COVID-19 vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible, routine processes and procedures remain in place to ensure the safety of any vaccine that is authorized or approved for use. Safety is a top priority, and there are many reasons to get vaccinated.

    Dr. Lisa Morici will talk about how the vaccines have been developed, the safety and efficacy information from clinical trials, and why vaccination works to help stop the spread of COVID-19. Natalie Roy will explain why those who work in agriculture are considered essential workers and may receive prioritization in accessing the vaccine. Please join us in this important webinar so together we can reduce the spread of misinformation and help agricultural communities access the Covid-19 vaccine.

    Intended Audience: Agriculture producers, safety and health professionals, health care providers, other people working in agriculture.

    Funded under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012345 with the University of North Texas Health Science Center - Gibson D. Lewis Library, and awarded by the DHHS, NIH, National Library of Medicine.

    Lisa Morici, PhD

    Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tulane University

    Tulane University

    Dr. Lisa Morici is a tenured Associate Professor in the Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology at Tulane University School of Medicine. Her research program focuses on the development of next generation vaccines for biodefense and emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases. Dr. Morici has successfully moved candidate vaccines from the discovery stage to planned phase 1 clinical trials. Her vaccine research program is currently supported by the National Institutes of Health and the Dept. of Defense.

    Natalie Roy, MPH

    AgriSafe Executive Director

    As Executive Director of AgriSafe for over twenty years, Natalie Roy utilizes her public health training to improve the quality of health care offered to farm families. Natalie holds a Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She is pleased to work in the area of agricultural health as it relates to her experience growing up on a farm in Canterbury New Hampshire.

  • Invest in Your Health: Prevention of Zoonotic Diseases (January 20, 2021)

    Contains 7 Component(s)

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agricultural producers are at high risk for acquiring a zoonotic disease related to their work environment with minimal information related to risks, symptoms and prevention. The majority of emerging infectious diseases in the U.S. are zoonotic in nature. They are often difficult to determine and many go unreported for a variety of reasons.

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agricultural producers are at high risk for acquiring a zoonotic disease related to their work environment with minimal information related to risks, symptoms and prevention. The majority of emerging infectious diseases in the U.S. are zoonotic in nature. They are often difficult to determine and many go unreported for a variety of reasons.
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1. Define zoonotic disease and identify various modes of transmission; 
    2. Locate recommended educational resources for use in educational programs; 
    3. Discuss warning signs and symptoms of major zoonotic diseases; 
    4. Identify zoonotic diseases affecting the production agricultural population

    Invest in Your Health is supported by:

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    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett has her BS in Molecular Biology from Defiance College, MS in Environmental Toxicology from Texas Tech University, and is currently a DVM candidate at Michigan State University. Her passion for public health began during a water testing project in Tanzania, Africa and has continued to evolve and include research focused on wildlife diseases and vector-borne zoonoses. Katelyn also served as a member of the AgriSafe Young Advisors Council, from 2016-2017. In her role as a rural leader, she assisted AgriSafe in design and launching of educational initiatives that can reduce farm related illness, injury and fatalities.