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  • Safety Training on Dairy Farms using Mobile-Learning Technologies

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The delivery of safety training content to workers in agriculture can be a challenging undertaking. This webinar will present a relatively novel approach to the delivery of safety training content to vulnerable workers in the dairy industry.

    The delivery of safety training content to workers in agriculture can be a challenging undertaking. This webinar will present a relatively novel approach to the delivery of safety training content to vulnerable workers in the dairy industry.
    At the end of this webinar participants will be able to:
    1. Understand the challenges associated with safety training among agriculture workers; 
    2. Distinguish between electronic learning (e-learning) and mobile-learning (m-learning); 
    3. Understand the benefits and challenges associated with m-learning in agriculture; 
    4. Understand basic approaches to delivery of safety training content using m-learning; and 
    5. Understand the challenges associated with training effectiveness evaluation.

    David I. Douphrate PhD, MPT, MBA, CPE

    CSP University of Texas School of Public Health in San Antonio

    Dr. David Douphrate is an Assistant Professor with the Southwest Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, located at the University of Texas, School of Public Health. Douphrate conducts research and outreach related to worker health and safety through the High Plains and Intermountain Center for Agricultural Health and Safety (HICAHS), headquartered at Colorado State University. Douphrate and his colleagues conduct research and outreach with dairy producers to improve safe working environments while simultaneously improving dairy productivity and efficiency.

  • Feedyard Worker Safety- Stakeholder Recommendations for Improvement

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health in collaboration with the Texas Cattle Feeders Association, Moore Ag Safety and the Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America hosted a roundtable discussion designed to gather input regarding worker safety from stakeholders in the feedyard industry. The roundtable included workers, managers, owners, safety professionals, insurance representatives, veterinarians and research personnel. The meeting successfully identified hazards, including emerging issues, highlighted current training efforts, and prioritized needed changes related to worker safety and training at cattle feedyards. This webinar will report the outcomes from this roundtable and subsequent findings.

    The Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health in collaboration with the Texas Cattle Feeders Association, Moore Ag Safety and the Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America hosted a roundtable discussion designed to gather input regarding worker safety from stakeholders in the feedyard industry. The roundtable included workers, managers, owners, safety professionals, insurance representatives, veterinarians and research personnel. The meeting successfully identified hazards, including emerging issues, highlighted current training efforts, and prioritized needed changes related to worker safety and training at cattle feedyards. This webinar will report the outcomes from this roundtable and subsequent findings.
    After viewing this webinar, participants will be able to:
    1. Assess worker safety hazards present on Midwestern feedyards
    2. Describe recommendations made by stakeholders to improve feedyard worker safety
    3. Identify current collaborative efforts designed to improve feedyard worker safety

    Ellen Duysen, MPH

    Community Outreach Specialist and Coordinator - Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health (CS-CASH) Department of Environmental, Agricultural and Occupational Health, UNMC

    As Center Coordinator for CS-CASH, Ms. Duysen provides the Center Director with assistance in planning, coordinating, and monitoring the 23 projects funded by the Center. These projects encompass research, prevention/intervention, education/translation, outreach, evaluation, and cross-disciplinary efforts. She engages in internal and external advisory committees, oversees fiscal and resource management, maintains records, and compiles Center reports. Ms. Duysen is the course director for the annual, week-long Ag Medicine Course that provides continuing education credits to health care providers across the US. In addition to administrative responsibilities, she is involved with the Center's active Outreach program. The program delivers educational materials, demonstrations, and presentations on the topics of respiratory and hearing protection, as well as injury prevention to the agricultural community in the Center's seven states region.

  • This is Our Brain on Stress

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The downturn in the agricultural economy continues to create stress for farm families, workers, and ag professionals who provide products, services and information in rural communities. This session will present basic information on the stress response and how short-term, acute stress evolves toward longer-term, chronic stress. Brain science research is reviewed, providing a strong basis for necessary and impactful ways to help people "manage" stress, reduce health impacts, and increase abilities to make sound, thoughtful business and family decisions.

    The downturn in the agricultural economy continues to create stress for farm families, workers, and ag professionals who provide products, services and information in rural communities. This session will present basic information on the stress response and how short-term, acute stress evolves toward longer-term, chronic stress. Brain science research is reviewed, providing a strong basis for necessary and impactful ways to help people "manage" stress, reduce health impacts, and increase abilities to make sound, thoughtful business and family decisions.
    By the end of this session, participants will be able to:
    1. Review and explain the "brain science" connected to how people experience acute stress.  
    2. Describe how acute stress evolves toward chronic stress and three specific outcomes of chronic stress exposure. 
    3. Explain three specific stress coping mechanisms that positively change our brains and bodies, alleviating stress effects including those which can be recommended or facilitated by agricultural professionals and service providers.

    Dr. John Shutske

    Professor and Extension Specialist in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Biological Systems Engineering Department

    Dr. Shitske spent eight years in College of Agriculture and Extension Administration as an Associate Dean.  John returned to a faculty role in July of 2016.  His research work will continue to focus on efforts to apply, design, and evaluate new strategies and technologies that impact negative health outcomes for people who live and work on farms while simultaneously pursuing enhanced profitability.  John also has an affiliate appointment in the UW's Family Medicine Department in the School of Medicine and Public Health. This relationship includes working with health professionals, Extension colleagues, and agricultural services providers to reduce the burden of occupational illness and injury in farming.

  • Respiratory Protection and On-Farm Fit Testing for Agricultural Workers

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    In this webinar, participants will learn about agricultural respiratory hazards and how to select appropriate protection. An overview of medical clearance and fit testing requirements will be given, as well as a discussion of some of the unique challenges faced when providing these services to the agricultural population.

    In this webinar, participants will learn about agricultural respiratory hazards and how to select appropriate protection. An overview of medical clearance and fit testing requirements will be given, as well as a discussion of some of the unique challenges faced when providing these services to the agricultural population.
    Learning objectives: 
    1. Identify agricultural workers who may be exposed to hazards that require respiratory protection 
    2. Understand the different types of respirators and cartridges and how to select appropriate protection 
    3. Describe how fit testing is performed and why it is needed 

    Anna Meyerhoff

    The New York Center for Agricultural Medicine & Health / Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety - Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing (NYCAMH/NEC), Cooperstown NY

    Anna Meyerhoff is the Bilingual Farm Safety Coordinator for NYCAMH/NEC. Anna develops and delivers bilingual farm safety and emergency response trainings as well as providing other outreach services throughout NY and the Northeast.  She received a BA in Spanish from SUNY Geneseo, worked on her family's dairy farm, and has lived and studied abroad in Central America.

    Melissa Horsman

    The New York Center for Agricultural Medicine & Health / Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety - Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing (NYCAMH/NEC), Cooperstown NY

    Melissa Horsman is the PPE Program Coordinator for NYCAMH/NEC.  She is responsible for administering the Personal Protective Equipment and On-Farm Fit Testing Programs. Melissa attended Texas A&M University where she studied Zoology and honed her MSDS decryption skills.

  • Staying Cool in Your Region's Heat: How to manage, identify, and reduce heat illnesses and sun exposure

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    This session will include information on heat exposure, ways to reduce the chances of experiencing heat related illness, sun exposure, safety, and identification of aspects that can be screened as skin cancer. It will also help participants identify if they or someone they are working with is experiencing heat stress, heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

    This session will include information on heat exposure, ways to reduce the chances of experiencing heat related illness, sun exposure, safety, and identification of aspects that can be screened as skin cancer. It will also help participants identify if they or someone they are working with is experiencing heat stress, heat exhaustion or heat stroke.
    Objectives: 
    1. Participants will gain knowledge in identifying signs and symptoms of heat stress, heat exhaustion and heat stroke along with treatments that can be provided when identified. 
    2. Participants will have an increased knowledge of how heat index can be used to help plan and reduce heat stress, heat exhaustion and heat stroke 
    3. Participants will gain knowledge on how to identify questionable areas on skin that need to be future evaluated due to skin exposure along with ways to prevent skin damage. 

    Jessica Wilburn, RN, MSN, CEN

    AgriSafe NC Nurse Coordinator, NC Agromedicine Institute

    As AgriSafe-NC Nurse Coordinator and co-owner of a registered Angus seed stock farm, Ms. Wilburn has both professional and personal knowledge of the health and safety issues affecting agricultural populations. Jessica has provided agricultural health and safety training for farmers, healthcare providers, Cooperative Extension agents and others.

  • Safe and Healthy Recovery After a Farm Flood

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Disaster recovery can be as dangerous as the disaster itself, especially if no disaster preparedness plan was implemented. This is especially true on farms and ranches where inherent farm hazards such as machinery and equipment, livestock, and agriculture chemicals are displaced and co-mingle, putting all emergency response personnel, farm workers and family members in danger. Floods can heighten the risk of health threats such as mold, tetanus bacteria, contaminated well water, heat illness and high stress. This presentation will highlight basic precautions to prevent possible diseases and injuries during and after flooding.

    Disaster recovery can be as dangerous as the disaster itself, especially if no disaster preparedness plan was implemented. This is especially true on farms and ranches where inherent farm hazards such as machinery and equipment, livestock, and agriculture chemicals are displaced and co-mingle, putting all emergency response personnel, farm workers and family members in danger. Floods can heighten the risk of health threats such as mold, tetanus bacteria, contaminated well water, heat illness and high stress. This presentation will highlight basic precautions to prevent possible diseases and injuries during and after flooding. 
    By the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to: 
    · Identify common human health risks faced during a farm flood. 
    · Discuss prevention tips and injury prevention for common human health risks. 
    · Identify AgriSafe and external resources to address human health risks during a farm flood.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association’s and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.  

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

    Chad Roy, PhD, MSPH

    Director, Infectious Disease Aerobiology, Director, Biodefense Research Programs, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Professor of Microbiology & Immunology, Tulane School of Medicin

    Dr. Roy is a professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Tulane University School of Medicine and also the Director of Infectious Disease Aerobiology at the Tulane National Primate Research Center. Dr. Roy's research focuses on respiratory health and the aerobiology of infectious diseases.

  • Talking to Farmers About Their Pain

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The occupational hazards that farmers face put them at greater risk for acute and chronic pain as a result of ergonomic repetition, accident, or surgical procedure. Addressing specific occupational sources of pain and what activities the pain inhibits are crucial to improving treatment. This module will focus on how to transform the conversation between provider and patient to improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction.

    The occupational hazards that farmers face put them at greater risk for acute and chronic pain as a result of ergonomic repetition, accident, or surgical procedure. Addressing specific occupational sources of pain and what activities the pain inhibits are crucial to improving treatment. This module will focus on how to transform the conversation between provider and patient to improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction.
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1.  Understand the prevalence of occupational hazards amongst farming occupations.
    2.  Recognize occupational implications as they relate to acute and chronic pain.
    3.  Gain strategies to improve provider-patient conversations about occupational farmer
    pain.
    4.  Identify patient resources to aid in facilitating candid discussion about pain.
    Sponsored by:

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    This project was supported by the FY17 USDA NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant # 2017-46100-27225 and the FY18 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants (ROTA) # TI-18-022

    Alison Hartman, DPT, CF-L1

    Consulting PT, DPT, CF-L1 Pro-Activity North Carolina

    Clinically trained as a Doctor of Physical Therapy, Ali harbors a deep appreciation for the human body and the resilience it holds. Unlike traditional rehabilitation professionals, Ali spends the majority of her time outside of the clinic walls, embedding herself within working populations to maximize the health, well-being, and performance of groups and individuals while leveraging her unique experience in workplace prevention and health promotion. She has completed advanced certifications in Applied Prevention and Health Promotion Therapies, and residency at Pro-Activity, a human achievement company that has specialized in workplace prevention and health promotion with industrialized workforces for the pasts 20 years. Ali was recently named managing partner of Pro-Activity’s North Carolina field office. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association’s and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Optimizing the Health of the Female Agricultural Producer

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    The number of U.S. farms operated by women has increased by nearly 60% over the past three decades, from 5 percent in 1978 to 30 percent in 2012. Farm women face unique environmental exposures, ergonomic challenges, and health disparities. Health and safety initiatives are traditionally targeted to male agricultural producers. Examining the unique health care concerns of the female agriculturist as well as strategies to integrate care for this population is the take home message within this presentation. Funding for this project provided by the Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health, NIOSH AFF Grant U54OH010162.

    The number of U.S. farms operated by women has increased by nearly 60% over the past three decades, from 5 percent in 1978 to 30 percent in 2012. Farm women face unique environmental exposures, ergonomic challenges, and health disparities. Health and safety initiatives are traditionally targeted to male agricultural producers. Examining the unique health care concerns of the female agriculturist as well as strategies to integrate care for this population is the take home message within this presentation. 
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to: 
    1. Describe today’s profile of a female agricultural producer. 
    2. Identify at least four leading health indicators impacting women in agriculture. 
    3. Locate three current evidenced based resources in the field of agricultural health and safety

    Funding for this project provided by the Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health, NIOSH AFF Grant U54OH010162.

    Linda Emanuel, RN

    Community Health Nurse, AgriSafe Network

    Good health advocacy has been at the heart of Linda’s essence from her formative years as a farm girl in eastern Nebraska. Graduating from Nebraska Methodist School of Nursing in 1985, she worked as an R.N. in a variety of acute care hospital settings for over 30 years. She and her husband Tom raised three sons on a successful row crop operation that has been able to welcome the next generation and their families home to continue to diversify their family business. Linda served as a Fellow in the Nebraska LEAD program and has also received agrimedicine training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Linda now serves on the advisory board for CS-CASH and a member of the AgriSafe team, as a Community Health Nurse.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association’s and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • The Ergonomics of Hand Planting Reforestation Work

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Reforestation work is vital to the health of America's forests and the U.S. economy. Hand planting, a common reforestation practice, provides unique challenges to safety and health practitioners interested in reducing occupational injuries and illnesses. This webinar will share lessons learned from a team of investigators studying occupational exposures to physical risk factors among hand planters in the Southeastern United States.

    Reforestation work is vital to the health of America's forests and the U.S. economy. Hand planting, a common reforestation practice, provides unique challenges to safety and health practitioners interested in reducing occupational injuries and illnesses. This webinar will share lessons learned from a team of investigators studying occupational exposures to physical risk factors among hand planters in the Southeastern United States.
    At the end of this webinar, participants will have a better understanding of 
    1. What hand planting work involves
    2. The challenges associated with collecting exposure information within the agriculture, forestry, and fishing industry sector
    3. The importance of studying and preventing injuries and illnesses among reforestation workers.

    Mark Schall, PhD, CPE

    Assistant Professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Auburn University

    Mark Schall earned his PhD in Industrial Engineering from the University of Iowa in December 2014 where he was a graduate fellow of the Heartland Education and Research Center and the Healthier Workforce Center for Excellence. His primary research interests are in applying direct measurement technologies to assess exposure to physical risk factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders and developing ergonomic interventions that reduce the incidence of adverse health conditions among working people.

    Robert Granzow, MS, AEP

    Robert F. Granzow, MS, AEP is a PhD candidate in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering in the College of Engineering at Auburn University. He is a student in the Deep South Center for Occupational Health and Safety (a NIOSH Education and Research Center) Occupational Ergonomics and Safety program.

  • Farmer's Preferences for Hearing Protection Devices: Do Educational Interventions Work?

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Although 44% of Midwestern farmers reported noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) symptoms, less than one-third report using hearing protection devices (HPDs) when working around loud noises. Few studies have evaluated which HPD models farmers prefer to wear, and how educational activities may influence this preference. Dr. Gibbs will be discussing current research on farmer’s priorities and preferences for HPD types, as well as the impact of several hearing conservation education activities.

    Although 44% of Midwestern farmers reported noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) symptoms, less than one third report using hearing protection devices (HPDs) when working around loud noises. Few studies have evaluated which HPD models farmers prefer to wear, and how educational activities may influence this preference. Dr. Gibbs will be discussing current research on farmer’s priorities and preferences for HPD types, as well as the impact of several hearing conservation education activities.
    At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:
    1. Discuss the prevalence of Noise-Induced-Hearing-Loss (NIHL) symptoms among farmers.
    2. List farmer's top priorities and concerns when choosing hearing protection devices.
    3. Learn about the best HPD models to promote in agricultural hearing conservation campaigns.
    4. Learn more about how to implement successful hearing conservation educational activities.

    Jenna Gibbs, PhD, MPH

    Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health, University of Iowa

    Jenna Gibbs has been the Center Coordinator of the Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health (GPCAH) at the University of Iowa for two years. Prior to her work at GPCAH, Jenna was an industrial hygienist at NIOSH/CDC in Morgantown, WV. Jenna got her PhD in environmental health at University of Washington, while working at the Pacific Northwest Agricultural Health and Safety Center.  Her research interests include hearing conservation, pesticides, and air quality improvements in livestock operation.