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  • Contains 7 Component(s)

    Stigma exists across all age groups for those struggling with mental health. Navigation of the teen years in everyday situations can create angst and uncomfortable feelings that are difficult to express. Adding mental illness and mental crisis to a teen or young adult’s typical growth and development makes struggling with emotions, relationships, academic success, and safety more challenging. According to the CDC, rates of depression and anxiety climb significantly during the ages of 12-17. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youths in the United States. This module opens an introductory discussion of mental health among teens and young adults with guidance from an adult educator. Focus is placed on decreasing stigma, improving mental health literacy, and positive coping skills for teens and young adults. The module showcases a high school agricultural student’s understanding of the agricultural mental health crisis, helping to frame mental health distress to academic and future career success.

    Summary: Stigma exists across all age groups for those struggling with mental health. Navigation of the teen years in everyday situations can create angst and uncomfortable feelings that are difficult to express. Adding mental illness and mental crisis to a teen or young adult’s typical growth and development makes struggling with emotions, relationships, academic success, and safety more challenging. According to the CDC, rates of depression and anxiety climb significantly during the ages of 12-17. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youths in the United States. This module opens an introductory discussion of mental health among teens and young adults with guidance from an adult educator. Focus is placed on decreasing stigma, improving mental health literacy, and positive coping skills for teens and young adults. The module showcases a high school agricultural student’s understanding of the agricultural mental health crisis, helping to frame mental health distress to academic and future career success. 

     Objectives: After the module, teens and young adults will be able to....

    1. Understand the relationship of mental health to physical health and academic or career success 
    2. Recognize basic signs or symptoms that present when young adults experience mental stress 
    3. Identify healthy and unhealthy coping behaviors when faced with mental distress 
    4. Communicate their concerns when suspecting they or someone they know is experiencing a mental health crisis 

    Intended Audience: This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults.



    Invest in Your Health is supported by:

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    Tara Haskins, DNP, MSN, RN, AHN-BC

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/13/2022

    Learn about AgriSafe’s new forestry initiative to reduce occupation-related health disparities for forestry workers through trainings. After the info session, the floor was opened for questions, comments, and suggestions. (This session was held on December 13, 2022.)

    Learn about AgriSafe’s new forestry initiative to reduce occupation-related health disparities for forestry workers through trainings. After the info session, the floor was opened for questions, comments, and suggestions. (This session was held on December 13, 2022.)

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health Program Director, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Public Health Program Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

    Tara Haskins, DNP, MSN, RN, AHN-BC

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/08/2022

    As people spend more time outdoors, so do many insects and pests. Among them are ticks, which are small bloodsucking insects. The deer tick (also known as the black-legged tick) is found mainly in the Eastern and upper Midwestern regions of the U.S. It can cause conditions such as Lyme disease – the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. This webinar will cover the things you need to know to prevent tick bites when working outdoors, how to remove a tick if bitten, as well as the symptoms that can result from tick bites that may indicate Lyme Disease.

    Summary: As people spend more time outdoors, so do many insects and pests. Among them are ticks, which are small bloodsucking insects. The deer tick (also known as the black-legged tick) is found mainly in the Eastern and upper Midwestern regions of the U.S. It can cause conditions such as Lyme disease – the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. This webinar will cover the things you need to know to prevent tick bites when working outdoors, how to remove a tick if bitten, as well as the symptoms that can result from tick bites that may indicate Lyme Disease.

    Intended Audience: This course is intended for Ag professionals, educators, and individuals involved in working and recreation outdoors.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    Gain an understanding of tick-borne disease control measures to reduce exposure risks among ag workers.
    Describe Lyme Disease and its regional variation.
    Describe symptoms of the different types of Lyme Disease.
    Identify workers’ rights and employers’ responsibilities for the workplace.

    Abigail Kahrs, MPH

    Program Coordinator

    AgriSafe Network

    Abigail Kahrs is the Program Coordinator for AgriSafe. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Animal Science as well as a Master’s in Public Health. She organizes, and coordinates educational opportunities and resources for farmers, farm labor contractors, farm workers, and their families on issues associated with health and work safety (pesticide safety, weather protection, and other occupational hazards) as well as overall agricultural worker family well-being. She primarily assists in the scheduling, training, and reporting of women’s health, infectious diseases, and youth safety programs at AgriSafe Network.

  • Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/17/2022

    Falls by older adults are common and usually multifactorial. Falls are associated with functional decline. Prevention of falls in older adults is better than treatment. Screening for fall risk factors is essential to create customized preventive interventions and is very effective. Falls prevention guidelines by different health organizations and their recommendation for multifactorial interventions are available.

    Summary: Falls by older adults are common and usually multifactorial. Falls are associated with functional decline. Prevention of falls in older adults is better than treatment. Screening for fall risk factors is essential to create customized preventive interventions and is very effective. Falls prevention guidelines by different health organizations and their recommendation for multifactorial interventions are available.

    Objectives: At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to…

    • Identify the risk factors of falls in older adults
    • Understand the consequences and complications of falls in older adults
    • Recognize the importance of falls screening in older adults
    • Learn how to assess, evaluate, and prevent falls in older people

    Intended Audience: Health Care providers- Physicians, Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants/Associates, Nurses, MPH Students, and Others e.g. Physical Therapist, Social Workers, etc.

    Ali, Lobna H., MD

    Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine

    Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

    Doctor Lobna Ali is a board-certified physician in family medicine and geriatrics. She is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine and the Associate Program Director of the Geriatric Fellowship at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans. Dr. Ali is a Certified Medical Director and serves as the Medical Director of the Audubon Retirement Village in New Orleans. Dr. Ali is an active member of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and a member of the AGS’s Public Education Committee. She is also an active member of the Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (AMDA) and is a member of the AMDA’s Education Committee. She has been the vice president of the Louisiana Geriatrics Society (LGS) since 2020. Dr. Ali has devoted herself to serving the needs of older adults throughout her professional career. Her philosophy of care centers on patients and their safety. As a geriatrician, she aims to restore patients’ independence and improve their quality of life.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will introduce participants to current challenges in the commercial fishing industry and how they are impacting the mental health and well-being of commercial fishermen and their communities. The presenters will also share resources that are available (and in the process of being created) that are intended to promote mental health awareness and provide resources for fishermen seeking support.

    Summary: This webinar will introduce participants to current challenges in the commercial fishing industry and how they are impacting the mental health and well-being of commercial fishermen and their communities. The presenters will also share resources that are available (and in the process of being created) that are intended to promote mental health awareness and provide resources for fishermen seeking support.

    Intended Audience: This presentation is for anyone interested in better understanding the needs of the commercial fishing community, and the work that is being done to support fishermen and their communities.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    • Have a general understanding of challenges that affect the mental and physical health of individuals who earn their living from fishing.
    • Learn about work that has been done to support the mental and physical health of commercial fishermen.
    • Find helpful resources that are available (or in the process of being made available) to support the work of providers interested in working with the commercial fishing community, or for anyone who wants to know more about health and wellness in the fishing community in general. (i.e., Fishing Forward podcast, FishAbility, ManTherapy)

    Monique Coombs

    Director of Community Programs

    Maine Coast Fishermen’s Association

    Monique Coombs is the Director of Community Programs for the Maine Coast Fishermen’s Association. She has been a part of the commercial fishing community for nearly two decades (and is married to a commercial fisherman). Her work has focused on seafood distribution, working waterfront, and wellness. Currently, she runs a program at the MCFA focusing on Fishermen Wellness, partnering with organizations like the Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety, NAMI Maine, and Access Health to identify and build resources specifically for the commercial fishing community, and to help educate behavioral health specialists on the needs of the fishing community.

    Mandy Roome, PhD

    Research Scientist

    Bassett Healthcare Network

    Amanda (Mandy) Roome is a research scientist at the Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in agriculture, forestry, and fishing. She works with
    commercial fishermen to determine ways to improve the health and safety of the industry. She has worked on a lifejacket initiative, working with commercial lobstermen in the Northeast to identify lifejackets that are both comfortable and feasible for them to work in. More recently, she has been teaming up with MCFA and Man Therapy to develop mental health resources geared toward commercial fishermen.

  • Contains 8 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/17/2022

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. The young ag producer works in an environment with noise hazards and plays in an environment with noise hazards. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is common (and preventable) but unfortunately, use of hearing protection among youth is not.

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. The young ag producer works in an environment with noise hazards and plays in an environment with noise hazards. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is common (and preventable) but unfortunately, use of hearing protection among youth is not. 

    By the end of the Train the Trainer session, participants/educators will be able to: 
    - Understand the pathophysiology of hearing loss 
    - Recognize the importance of preventing noise induced hearing loss 
    - Use the Invest in Your Health training materials and classroom activities to teach hearing loss prevention

    Other available Train the Trainer Modules include:

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    Marjorie McCullagh, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC, COHN-S, FAAOHN, FAAN

    Professor and Occupational Health Nursing Program Director, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    Marjorie McCullagh is Professor in the School of Nursing. She holds a PhD in nursing from the University of Michigan and has 20 years of clinical, teaching, and research experience in hearing conservation. Dr. McCullagh's career has focused on occupational health and safety, particularly as it relates to use of personal protection devices among farm operators and their families. Since 1985 she has had an active program of research in mitigating hazardous occupational exposures. She has conducted several randomized clinical trials, comparing the effectiveness of several approaches to influencing use of personal protective equipment. Dr. McCullagh is an associate professor and Director of the Occupational Health Nursing program at the University of Michigan School of Nursing.

  • Contains 5 Component(s)

    Summary: Caring for both the physical and emotional health of our next generation is crucial. From adapting to changes to feeling overwhelmed, like adults, children also experience stress and anxiety; however, they may be unsure of what they are feeling and how to respond. During this webinar, we will take a closer look at the status of farm youth mental health. We will recognize causes of stress among youth living in farming and rural communities and highlight the resources available to assist families.

    Summary: Caring for both the physical and emotional health of our next generation is crucial. From adapting to changes to feeling overwhelmed, like adults, children also experience stress and anxiety; however, they may be unsure of what they are feeling and how to respond. During this webinar, we will take a closer look at the status of farm youth mental health. We will recognize causes of stress among youth living in farming and rural communities and highlight the resources available to assist families.

    Intended Audience: Extension, practitioners, educators, farming/rural families, etc. 

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to...
    - Describe the status of farm youth's mental health including the prevalence of anxiety and depression. 
    - Recognize common and unique reasons or causes of stress among youth living in farming and rural communities.
    - Identify mental health and wellness resources available to assist farm families and where to locate them.

    Josie Rudolphi, PhD

    Assistant Professor/Extension Specialist

    University of Illinois

    Josie M. Rudolphi, PhD, is an assistant professor and Extension specialist in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Rudolphi’s research quantifies the burden of mental health conditions among agricultural populations, identifies risk and protective factors, and considers socio-ecological interventions. She is the director of the North Central Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance, a 12-state collaborative that increases and expands stress and mental health services to agricultural producers, workers, and their families

    Jana Davidson, M.Ed.

    Program Manager

    Progressive Agriculture Foundation

    As Program Manager, Jana Davidson leads the Foundation’s program team overseeing day-to-day and long-range program operations, while continuing to strengthen the overall reach, impact, and outcomes of the Progressive Agriculture Safety Day® programs. She guides the program staff through ongoing efforts to reach more children, families, and communities throughout North America to best align with the ongoing needs in rural and farming landscapes. Davidson received her Bachelor of Science degree from the Pennsylvania State University in Agribusiness Management and went on to earn a Master of Education specializing in Teaching & Curriculum. Davidson believes in the mission of the PAF Safety Day program in helping provide practical solutions through hands-on education and resources to overcome the problem of preventable injuries and fatalities among youth living, working, and visiting farms. She has been a volunteer with the PAF Safety Day program since 2005 and continues to coordinate a PAF Safety Days in her local community.

  • Contains 5 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/26/2022

    Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farm workers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team and effectively communicating within that team are essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Summary: Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farmworkers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team, and effectively communicating within that team is essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Intended Audience: Supervisor or Managers: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns, and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    • Define zoonotic disease and identify various modes of transmission
    • Identify a minimum of four significant zoonotic diseases affecting the production agricultural population
    • Discuss warning signs and symptoms of major zoonotic diseases which have adverse effects for reproductive health
    • Locate a minimum of three recommended educational resources for use in training an agricultural workforce

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health Program Director, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Public Health Program Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Contains 3 Component(s)

    Summary: Workplace sexual harassment (WSH) in agriculture is a persistent and pervasive problem that threatens employees’ safety and well-being and damages organizational climate and trajectory. Until recently, tailored trainings about WSH and resources specific to the agricultural sector and its audiences were lacking. Over the past several years, researchers and partners with the Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health (PNASH) Center in Washington State have worked with a number of agricultural and industry stakeholders (e.g. farmworkers, growers, government leaders and agencies, legal experts, advocates, etc.), to explore the nature of WSH and to develop relative education, resources, and training. While education alone will not stop WSH, it’s an important strategy in a multi-faceted approach to prevention. In this webinar, participants will be introduced to The Basta! Prevent Sexual Harassment in Agriculture training, toolkit, and video. The Basta! training uses an evidence-based, community engaged approach to help employees, HR staff, and growers prevent and address sexual harassment in the agricultural workplace.

    Summary: 

    Workplace sexual harassment (WSH) in agriculture is a persistent and pervasive problem that threatens employees’  safety and well-being  and damages organizational climate and trajectory. Until recently, tailored trainings about WSH and resources specific to the agricultural sector and its audiences were lacking. Over the past several years, researchers and partners with the Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health (PNASH) Center in Washington State have worked with a number of agricultural and industry stakeholders (e.g. farmworkers, growers, government leaders and agencies, legal experts, advocates, etc.), to explore the nature of WSH and to develop relative education, resources, and training.  While education alone will not stop WSH, it’s an important strategy in a multi-faceted approach to prevention. In this webinar, participants will be introduced to The Basta! Prevent Sexual Harassment in Agriculture training, toolkit, and video. The Basta! training uses an evidence-based, community engaged approach to help employees, HR staff, and growers prevent and address sexual harassment in the agricultural workplace.

    Following the session, the learner will be able to:
    a. Summarize the scope and nature of workplace sexual harassment in agriculture.
    b. Examine multi-level factors that influence sexual harassment in agriculture.
    c. Review employer’s and employees’ rights and responsibilities in reporting and addressing workplace sexual harassment.
    d. Share effective strategies and interventions that can reduce the threat of workplace sexual harassment and strengthen protocols and reporting mechanisms for employee-victims.

    Live interpretation in Spanish will be available for this session.

    Jody Early, Ph.D., M.S., MCHES

    Associate Professor, Faculty Coordinator, Health Education and Promotion Minor, School of Nursing and Health Studies, University of Washington Bothell

    Dr. Jody Early is an Associate Professor of Health Studies and an affiliate faculty in Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies and the Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health Center at the University of Washington Bothell and Seattle campuses. She currently serves as lead faculty for the Health Education and Promotion minor in the School of Nursing and Health Studies and is a former Associate Director of UW Bothell’s Teaching and Learning Center.

     Over the last 25 years, Jody has dedicated her life to improving health equity and higher education. A Master Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES), Jody’s research, teaching and praxis largely explore structural and social ecological factors that impact the health and well-being of individuals and populations, especially among women and Latinx communities. Her work, both in and outside of the academy, has allowed her to collaborate with communities to design, implement, and evaluate, culturally tailored health education interventions and strategies, and to involve her students in the process.

    Dennise Drury, MPH

    Outreach and Education Specialist

    Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health Center (PNASH)

    Dennise Drury is the Outreach and Education Specialist at the Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health Center (PNASH) She has a background in environmental science and a passion for increasing the inclusivity and accessibility of science and research for Latino communities. In her current role, she works in collaboration with researchers, community organizations, and agricultural stakeholders to coordinate the Center's communications and educational activities. She has a passion for developing and evaluating workplace interventions to improve the health and safety of farmworkers. She is currently working on developing an evaluation of the Basta! Prevent Sexual Harassment in Agriculture worksite training and toolkit created in collaboration with the agricultural community.

    Mike Gempler

    Executive Director

    Washington Grower's League

    Mike Gempler is the Executive Director of the Washington Grower’s League. He received a bachelor’s degree in agriculture from Ohio State University and a master’s degree in agricultural economics from the University of Wyoming. Mike is also a graduate of the Washington Agriculture and Forestry Leadership Program and served as a past-president of the National Council of Agricultural Employers (NCAE), based in Washington, DC.

    Alyson Dimmit Gnam

    Attorney

    Northwest Justice Project

    Alyson Dimmitt Gnam is an attorney in the Farmworker Unit at the Northwest Justice Project in Washington State. She represents agricultural employees in sexual harassment claims, as well as discrimination, labor trafficking, and concerted activity cases. She is a member of the steering committee of the sexual harassment peer training project of the BASTA Coalition.

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Summary: Do farmers or ranchers really retire? Generational family operations frequently include the aging parents, the living legends of agriculture. Farmers and ranchers self-identify good health with the ability to work. The normal aging process slows down one’s ability to engage in meaningful activities physically and mentally, essentially to continue working. Swirl in the postmenopausal issues incurred by the female farmer, and a myriad of health hazards arise.

    Summary: Do farmers or ranchers really retire? Generational family operations frequently include the aging parents, the living legends of agriculture. Farmers and ranchers self-identify good health with the ability to work. The normal aging process slows down one’s ability to engage in meaningful activities physically and mentally, essentially to continue working. Swirl in the postmenopausal issues incurred by the female farmer, and a myriad of health hazards arise.

    Unlike men, who experience a gradual loss of bone mass as they age, women will lose over 30% of their bone mass in the first five years after menopause. Agriculture is a hazardous and uncertain profession. Women are working well past the age of menopause. Training measures should focus on avoiding common risk factors and preventative actions to decrease the likelihood of an injury. Workplace and home safety are achievable. We will also address other age-related changes such as vision, hearing, and sleep disturbance. Every member of the family operation will benefit from learning creative strategies and solutions to help the aging in-place seniors achieve wellness and self-fulfillment.

    Linda Emanuel, RN

    Community Health Nurse, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Good health advocacy has been at the heart of Linda’s essence from her formative years as a farm girl in eastern Nebraska. Graduating from Nebraska Methodist School of Nursing in 1985, she worked as an R.N. in a variety of acute care hospital settings for over 30 years. She and her husband Tom raised three sons on a successful row crop operation that has been able to welcome the next generation and their families home to continue to diversify their family business. Linda served as a Fellow in the Nebraska LEAD program and has also received agrimedicine training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Linda now serves on the advisory board for CS-CASH and a member of the AgriSafe team, as a Community Health Nurse.