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  • Wildfire Health Threats: Risk Factors for Farmers and Ranchers (June 17, 2021)

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    Summary: Wildfires have become a persistent health threat for people working in agriculture. This webinar will focus on understanding the risks of exposure to wildfire smoke and potential strategies for responding to protect human health. Best practices for protecting worker health will be shared based on California's requirements along with resources for talking with agricultural workers about wildfire exposure risks. Intended Audience: farmers, ranchers, agricultural producers, agricultural workers, employers, agricultural safety and health professions, health professionals Objectives: By the end of this webinar, attendees will be able to… - Establish key concerns surrounding agricultural workers and exposure to wildfire smoke - Identify existing information gaps and propose potential solutions - Present preliminary efforts to develop a response framework targeted to farmers and ranchers - List best practices for protecting worker health during wildfire conditions - Identify at least one resource for sharing with ag workers related to wildfires

    Summary: Wildfires have become a persistent health threat for people working in agriculture. This webinar will focus on understanding the risks of exposure to wildfire smoke and potential strategies for responding to protect human health. Best practices for protecting worker health will be shared based on California's requirements along with resources for talking with agricultural workers about wildfire exposure risks.

    Intended Audience: farmers, ranchers, agricultural producers, agricultural workers, employers, agricultural safety and health professions, health professionals

    Objectives: By the end of this webinar, attendees will be able to…  

    - Establish key concerns surrounding agricultural workers and exposure to wildfire smoke  

    - Identify existing information gaps and propose potential solutions  

    - Present preliminary efforts to develop a response framework targeted to farmers and ranchers  

    - List best practices for protecting worker health during wildfire conditions  

    - Identify at least one resource for sharing with ag workers related to wildfires

    Teresa Andrews, MS

    Education and Outreach Specialist, Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, University of California Davis

    Ms. Andrews has extensive experience working with cultural minorities, including developing educational materials and conducting training. She collaborated with the Division for the Application of Research Discoveries, NHLBI in the development of culturally sensitive materials on nutrition and physical activity to be used by community health workers to help people build skills to make practical, lasting changes to help fight disease.  In her current role as outreach and educational specialist for the Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, Ms. Andrews has forged collaborative links with Hispanic farm worker groups, growers, farm labor contractors, community organizations, employers, and insurance personnel. She has developed low-literacy educational materials and conducted training sessions in both English and Spanish for farm worker children, dairy workers, farmers, and others.

    Elena Austin, MS, ScD

    Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington

    Dr. Austin received her Doctor of Science in Environmental Health from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, with concentrations in Exposure Assessment and Biostatistics. Her expertise areas and past work include multi-pollutant exposure metrics, geographic information systems, remote sensing, risk communication in farm-worker communities and the development and evaluation of data visualization tools. A number of her projects leverage novel applications of emerging technologies to improve worker health and safety, particularly in WA State agricultural workers and their families. In her ongoing work, she aims to develop methods to jointly investigate exposures to mixtures of pollutants on human health, deploy low-cost methods to assess environmental exposures and implement novel intervention studies with the goal of improving community and worker health, with a particular focus on under-studied populations.

    Edward Kasner, MPH, PhD,

    ClinicalAssistant Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington

    Dr. Kasner is an exposure scientist with a focus on leveraging the tools of precision agriculture to prevent injury and illness among workers. He participates in strategic planning and partnership engagement for the agriculture, forestry, and fishing industries in his role as Outreach Director at the Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health (PNASH) Center. He has conducted pesticide exposure assessments for farmers in Southwest China, led pesticide-related occupational epidemiology studies at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and participated in Washington and Oregon state initiatives addressing pesticide application safety. He also contributes to projects about wildfire smoke and COVID-19, with a particular emphasis on data for agricultural health indicators, practical solutions, and reproducible research.

  • Using Naloxone to Reverse Opioid Overdose in the Agricultural Workplace: Information for Employers and Workers (Continuing Education: Multiple Disciplines)

    Contains 6 Component(s)

    In 2018, the U.S. Surgeon General called for increased awareness and availability of naloxone, the opioid antagonist, to reverse the effects of opioid overdose. Despite the rise in the dispensing of naloxone, there is a significant gap in our response across all sectors of society. In the rural parts of our country, where emergency response times can be dangerously long, developing a workplace naloxone availability and use program could ultimately save lives. This webinar will share information from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to help employers and workers understand the risk of opioid overdose and the role of naloxone.

    In 2018, the U.S. Surgeon General called for increased awareness and availability of naloxone, the opioid antagonist, to reverse the effects of opioid overdose. Despite the rise in the dispensing of naloxone, there is a significant gap in our response across all sectors of society. In the rural parts of our country, where emergency response times can be dangerously long, developing a workplace naloxone availability and use program could ultimately save lives. This webinar will share information from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to help employers and workers understand the risk of opioid overdose and the role of naloxone. 
    By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: 
    1. Discuss what medications are prescription and illicit opioids and what is OUD (Opioid Use Disorder) 
    2. Describe the dangers of opioids in the workplace and OUD for safety-sensitive occupations 
    3. Discuss the role of naloxone in opioid overdose 
    4. Discuss the implementation of workplace naloxone use programs 
    5. Understand the administration of the dosage forms available for naloxone used in an emergency
    Sponsored by:
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    This project was supported by the FY17 USDA NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Grant # 2017-46100-27225 and the FY18 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants (ROTA) # TI-18-022

    Continuing Health Professional Education is available for this webinar for free to licensed health care providers in the state of Mississippi. For health care providers outside of Mississippi, the continuing education is available for $40 per CE hour.

    Physician- AMA The University of Mississippi School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Mississippi School of Medicine designates this e-learning activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the educational activity.  

    Dental- ADA CERP – American Dental Association Continuing Education Recognition Program. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider. ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry. The University of Mississippi School of Dentistry designates this activity for 1.0 continuing education credits.

    Nursing- The University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing is approved as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by The Mississippi Nurses Foundation, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. As an approved provider, the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing awards this activity 1.0 contact hour(s).

    Social Work- This organization The University of Mississippi Medical Center provider number SWB 120016 is approved as a provider for continuing education by the Mississippi Board of Examiners and Marriage & Family Therapists; Approval Period: 1/15/2020 through 1/15/2022 Social workers will receive 1.0 continuing education clock hours in participating in this course General.

    Pharmacy- The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. Upon successful completion of this activity, seminar registrants will have continuing pharmacy education credit posted to their MyCPE Monitor (www.mycpemonitor.net). This seminar has been approved for (1.0 CEUs) by the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, Division of Pharmacy Professional Development. ACPE number: 0032-999-19-079-H01-P

    CHPE- This activity is approved by the University of Mississippi Medical Center Division of Continuing Health Professional Education for a maximum of 1.0 contact hours.

    Emergency Medical Services- This offering has been approved for 1.0 EMS continuing education credit by the Mississippi Bureau of Emergency Medical Services.

    For more information on courses and continuing education, please visit- https://learning.agrisafe.org/opioid-misuse-prevention

    Heather Lyons-Burney, Pharm.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, UMKC School of Pharmacy at MSU

    Dr. Heather Lyons-Burney serves as a Clinical Assistant Professor for the UMKC School of Pharmacy’s satellite site at MSU in Springfield, Missouri. A PharmD graduate of UMKC School of Pharmacy, she completed a PGY1 residency with Cox Health Systems in Springfield. Throughout her career she has promoted the profession of pharmacy and has encouraged the development of team-based patient-centered care and innovative services in the community practice setting, as well as the importance of community engagement.. Locally, Heather serves on the clinic’s Board, as well as co-Chairs both the Taney and Greene county coalitions focused on prevention of substance misuse – receiving the Generation Rx Champions Award in 2012, and a Southwest Missouri Jefferson Award in 2018.  In November 2018, she received the ACT Missouri’s Champion of Change for Prevention statewide award for her continuous prevention efforts.  

  • Invest in Your Health: Cultivating a Healthy Mind (May 26, 2021)

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Stigma exists across all age groups for those struggling with mental health. Navigation of the teen years in everyday situations can create angst and uncomfortable feelings that are difficult to express. Adding mental illness and mental crisis to a teen or young adult’s typical growth and development makes struggling with emotions, relationships, academic success, and safety more challenging. According to the CDC, rates of depression and anxiety climb significantly during the ages of 12-17. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youths in the United States. This module opens an introductory discussion of mental health among teens and young adults with guidance from an adult educator. Focus is placed on decreasing stigma, improving mental health literacy, and positive coping skills for teens and young adults. The module showcases a high school agricultural student’s understanding of the agricultural mental health crisis, helping to frame mental health distress to academic and future career success.

    Summary: Stigma exists across all age groups for those struggling with mental health. Navigation of the teen years in everyday situations can create angst and uncomfortable feelings that are difficult to express. Adding mental illness and mental crisis to a teen or young adult’s typical growth and development makes struggling with emotions, relationships, academic success, and safety more challenging. According to the CDC, rates of depression and anxiety climb significantly during the ages of 12-17. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youths in the United States. This module opens an introductory discussion of mental health among teens and young adults with guidance from an adult educator. Focus is placed on decreasing stigma, improving mental health literacy, and positive coping skills for teens and young adults. The module showcases a high school agricultural student’s understanding of the agricultural mental health crisis, helping to frame mental health distress to academic and future career success. 

     Objectives: After the module, teens and young adults will be able to....

    1. Understand the relationship of mental health to physical health and academic or career success 
    2. Recognize basic signs or symptoms that present when young adults experience mental stress 
    3. Identify healthy and unhealthy coping behaviors when faced with mental distress 
    4. Communicate their concerns when suspecting they or someone they know is experiencing a mental health crisis 

    Intended Audience: This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults.



    Invest in Your Health is supported by:

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    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

  • What to Expect While Expecting- For Female Producers & Farmworkers in Ag (May 6, 2021)

    Contains 5 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/06/2021

    Summary: Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges. Objectives: At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to: - Identify unique exposures/risks associated with farm tasks. - Identify at least four reproductive health and safety issues for women. - Locate three current evidenced based resources in the field of agricultural health - Develop Hazard Map of work exposures. - Select appropriate PPE for farm tasks to reduce or eliminate exposures and or risks. Intended Audience: Producers- This training is intended primarily for agricultural producers including but not limited to farmers, ranchers, and any person or persons involved in some combination of raising field crops, orchards, vineyards, poultry, or other livestock.

    Summary: Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges.

    Objectives: At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    - Identify unique exposures/risks associated with farm tasks.
    - Identify at least four reproductive health and safety issues for women.
    - Locate three current evidenced based resources in the field of agricultural health
    - Develop Hazard Map of work exposures.
    - Select appropriate PPE for farm tasks to reduce or eliminate exposures and or risks.

    Intended Audience: Producers- This training is intended primarily for agricultural producers including but not limited to farmers, ranchers, and any person or persons involved in some combination of raising field crops, orchards, vineyards, poultry, or other livestock.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Shari Franklin Smith, M. Eng and BS, Chemical Engineering

    3M, Lead Application Engineering Specialist for Food, Bev, Agriculture, Chemical & Construction Industry

    Shari Franklin Smith, CIH, CSP has 20+ years of experience helping to keep workers healthy and safe. She has worked with protective clothing including high visibility safety apparel and protective coveralls, and 9+ years of experience managing an organization of safety and health professionals supporting 3M’s PPE products such as hearing and respiratory protection, protective clothing, and fall protection and 3M™ Scotchlite™ Reflective Material. She has been involved in human factors research in visibility protective clothing and hearing conservation. She was also a member of the ISEA High Visibility Committee responsible for creating the ISEA/ANSI 107 standard and is the Secretary-Elect of the AIHA Construction Committee. Shari is currently supporting construction, chemical manufacturing, and the food and beverage industry as a lead application engineering specialist in 3M Personal Safety Division. She has helped several companies implement hearing protection fit testing, hosted multiple health and safety symposiums for the chemical, food and construction industries, and spoken on emerging health and safety concerns such as COVID-19, diacetyl in coffee processing, manganese hazards in welding, concerns for workers in legal cannabis growing, and changing regulations such as silica and beryllium.

  • Aging and Parkinson's Disease in Agriculture- Continuing Education Available for Multiple Disciplines (April 13, 2021)

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Parkinson's disease impacts over one million people living in the United States. People living in rural areas may not have access to specialists and getting diagnosis may be difficult. Rural health care providers and agricultural professionals need to develop an awareness of this neurodegenerative disorder and understand the effects on agricultural work. Participants will learn about rural specific resources, safety screening for aspects of agricultural work, tips to maximize farmer functioning, and communication strategies with farm families.

    Summary: Parkinson's disease impacts over one million people living in the United States. People living in rural areas may not have access to specialists and getting diagnosis may be difficult. Rural health care providers and agricultural professionals need to develop an awareness of this neurodegenerative disorder and understand the effects on agricultural work. Participants will learn about rural specific resources, safety screening for aspects of agricultural work, tips to maximize farmer functioning, and communication strategies with farm families.

    Objectives: At the end of this presentation, learners will be able to...

    • Understand the impact of aging on the farming workforce
    • Translate relevant strategies when interacting with people living with Parkinson’s that work in agricultural production
    • Understand why an in-home engagement is an important approach to consider for rural individuals with Parkinson disease
    • Use evidenced-based screening tools to address safety and foster communication for individuals with movement disorders working in agriculture

    Intended Audience: This course is intended for healthcare professionals, agricultural and agribusiness professionals, people engaged in agricultural work and families that encounter aging individuals living with movement disorders like Parkinson’s. Anyone working with aging producers in rural America and interested in preserving their safety and function will find value in this educational offering.

    Continuing Education:

    The Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety offers 0.1 CEU or 1.0 contact hours of participation. This course is eligible for 1.0 CPH Recertification Credits and is sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits. The following groups of professionals have been able to use these CEUs in the past; Industrial Hygiene (CIH), Certified Public Health Professional(CPH), Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Nursing (RN, LPN), Social Work (LSW), Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT), Audiology (ABA), and others.  Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits.

    NP’s and RN’s will gain the knowledge and understanding regarding aging in agriculture and Parkinson’s disease impact on agricultural work, driving safety, rural exercise programs as strategies to improve client outcomes.

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    This webinar is supported by:

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    Funded under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012345 with the University of North Texas Health Science Center - Gibson D. Lewis Library, and awarded by the DHHS, NIH, National Library of Medicine.

    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

    Amy Mullins, APRN, MSN, FNP-BC

    Family Nurse Practitioner, UT Health East Texas Neurological Institute

    Amy Mullins is a board-certified family nurse practitioner at the UT Health East Texas Neurological Institute where she cares for patients with Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and other movement disorders. She holds a Master of Science in Nursing from Southeast Missouri State University and is currently completing her Doctorate in Nursing Practice at University of Texas at Tyler. Amy is a certified Geriatric Nurse Generalist and Dementia care and Staff Educator. Her clinical practice places an emphasis on communication. "I try to develop a relationship where I'm 100 percent approachable - there's nothing you can't ask me."

    Averi Olson, OTS

    Averi Olson comes from a 4th generation farming family in North Dakota and will be receiving her doctorate in occupational therapy from the University of Mary this coming April 2021. Averi is a third-year doctoral student who is currently completing her capstone project on aging throughout agriculture with UMASH. Over the past year, she has completed her clinical hours in acute care, outpatient, and assisted living settings in Eastern North Dakota and Western Minnesota. Along with a farming background, Averi has a high interest in the aging population, workplace modification, adaptive strategies, the promotion of health and wellness. Upon graduation, she plans to remain in the Upper Midwest and provide occupational therapy services to rural areas. 

    Kristin Pickett, PhD, OT

    Assistant Professor in the Occupational Therapy Program in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison

    Dr. Kristin Pickett is an Assistant Professor in the Occupational Therapy Program in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She holds a B.S. in Biology from the University of Wisconsin–Platteville and Master and Doctoral degrees from the University of Minnesota–Twin Cities. Dr. Pickett’s doctoral work focused on the use of f-MRI to examine individuals with idiopathic focal hand dystonia. She completed a postdoctoral experience in the Physical Therapy and Movement Disorders Program in the Department of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Dr. Pickett’s current focus is on the use of collaborative and community-based research methods aimed at positively impacting meaningful health outcomes for older adults, especially those with Parkinson disease, who have limited access to effective forms of physical activity.

  • Expert Panel Discussion on Mediation and How It Can Help the Agricultural Community (April 28, 2021)

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    ​Summary: Mediation is an option for resolving disputes designed to decrease stress and empower participants. A trained and impartial mediator helps people discuss their dispute by encouraging them to focus on identifying solution options with the goal of them reaching a mutually accepted agreement. Free to low-cost agricultural mediation is available in most states through the USDA Agricultural Mediation Program. Join in on this expert panel discussion on the mediation process and how it can help the agricultural community. Roundtable Strategies (RTS) and the Florida Agricultural Mediation Program (FAMP) will present an hour-long webinar to build awareness in the agricultural community about the availability of the mediation process to resolve conflict. A panel of three experts (farmer representative, agency representative, and mediator representative) will discuss mediation. The following topics will be covered: a description of their experience with the mediation process, the benefits and limitations of mediation, how mediation differs from other dispute resolution processes, and how participants can get the most out of their mediation session. Objectives: By the end of this webinar, attendees will be able to… 1. Explain mediation and how it is used. 2. Describe how mediation differs from other dispute resolution processes. 3. Understand the benefits and limitations of the mediation process for resolving disputes. 4. Better prepare for a mediation session. 5. Access and make referrals to available agricultural mediation resources in each state. Intended Audience: Farmers and organizations that work with farmers.

    Summary: Mediation is an option for resolving disputes designed to decrease stress and empower participants. A trained and impartial mediator helps people discuss their dispute by encouraging them to focus on identifying solution options with the goal of them reaching a mutually accepted agreement. Free to low-cost agricultural mediation is available in most states through the USDA Agricultural Mediation Program. Join in on this expert panel discussion on the mediation process and how it can help the agricultural community.

    Roundtable Strategies (RTS) and the Florida Agricultural Mediation Program (FAMP) will present an hour-long webinar to build awareness in the agricultural community about the availability of the mediation process to resolve conflict. A panel of three experts (farmer representative, agency representative, and mediator representative) will discuss mediation. The following topics will be covered: a description of their experience with the mediation process, the benefits and limitations of mediation, how mediation differs from other dispute resolution processes, and how participants can get the most out of their mediation session.

    Objectives: By the end of this webinar, attendees will be able to…
    1. Explain mediation and how it is used.
    2. Describe how mediation differs from other dispute resolution processes.
    3. Understand the benefits and limitations of the mediation process for resolving disputes.
    4. Better prepare for a mediation session.
    5. Access and make referrals to available agricultural mediation resources in each state.

    Intended Audience: Farmers and organizations that work with farmers.

    Presented by: Roundtable Strategies (RTS) is a non-profit organization that administers the Michigan and Florida Agricultural Mediation Programs (MAMP & FAMP). RTS and FAMP are also sub-partners in the Southern Region – Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance Network (S-FRSAN) under the leadership of AgriSafe.

    Benny Bunting

    Lead Farmer Advocate, RAFI-USA

    Benny is a national leader in advocating for farm families and saving farms that would otherwise be lost to foreclosure. For more than 20 years, family farmers in crisis have turned to Benny for help. He provides farmers with a broad array of advocacy services, including financial counseling, legal referrals, and technical assistance. Benny counsels between 75 and 100 farmers each year and devotes 60 hours to each client, on average. In more than 90% of the cases he works on, Benny helps farmers realize their goals and achieve greater stability. In 2008, Benny was awarded the prestigious Nancy Susan Reynolds Award for Personal Service. He serves as Lead Farmer Advocate for the Rural Advancement Foundation International (RAFI-USA).

    Dr. Betsy Dierberger, PhD

    National Agronomist, USDA/NRCS

    Betsy is the National Agronomist with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). She works out of Washington, DC providing input on policy interpretations, developing conservation practices, and keeping up to date with innovative technologies in agriculture. Betsy received her PhD in Agriculture Communication and Education/Soil Science from the University of Nebraska. Her master’s degree work was at Oklahoma State University in Soil Genesis and Geomorphology. She attended Illinois State University for her bachelor's degree in Agriculture Science. Betsy has been with NRCS since 2005, first as a Grassland Forage Agronomist and then as a State Resource Conservationist. Prior to joining NRCS, Betsy served as an Agriculture Educator for Michigan State University in Livingston and Ingham counties.

    LyTanya Brown

    JD Director, Mississippi Agricultural Mediation Program Federation of Southern Cooperatives

    LyTanya Brown received her B.S. degree in Behavioral Science from University of Maryland University College. She received her Juris Doctor from Southern University Law Center. While attending SULC, she served as the Teacher’s Assistant in the Mediation Clinic and conducted mediations in such areas as peer-peer, landlord/tenant, agriculture, and family issues. She also co-founded Southern University Law Center’s Journal of Race, Gender, and Poverty, which became Southern University Law Center’s second Law Journal. After graduating Southern University Law Center, LyTanya Brown pursued a career in Mediation and obtained approval from the Governor of the State of Mississippi to create Mississippi’s first Certified Agricultural Mediation Program, which is administered by Mississippi Association of Cooperatives, where she has served as Director for the past eleven years. She was also very instrumental in obtaining certification for the Georgia Agricultural Mediation Program and the Louisiana Agricultural Mediation Program, which is administered by the Federation of Southern Cooperatives. Over the years, LyTanya has conducted hundreds of mediations, which has resulted in the preservation of hundreds of homes and thousands of acres of land, totaling millions of dollars.

  • Practical Solutions for Heat-Related Illness Prevention for Agriculture (April 7, 2021)

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Agricultural workers are at high risk of heat-related illness and recent field studies point to specific risk factors and solutions. This webinar is intended to prepare agricultural safety and health professionals for the upcoming summer season. We will share practical and evidence-based solutions for the prevention of heat-related illness in the agricultural work environment.

    Summary: Agricultural workers are at high risk of heat-related illness and recent field studies point to specific risk factors and solutions. This webinar is intended to prepare agricultural safety and health professionals for the upcoming summer season. We will share practical and evidence-based solutions for the prevention of heat-related illness in the agricultural work environment.

    Objectives: By the end of this presentation participants will be able to...

    • Describe risk factors for heat-related illness
    • Describe solutions for the prevention of heat-related illness that can be implemented in agricultural work environments
    • Locate bilingual training and prevention resources

    Intended Audience: Agricultural farmers, ranchers, supervisors, farmworkers, farmworker organizations, health and safety professionals, trainers, promotores, rural healthcare providers, extension agents, and others who work in agriculture.

    Funded under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012345 with the University of North Texas Health Science Center - Gibson D. Lewis Library, and awarded by the DHHS, NIH, National Library of Medicine.

    Roxana Chicas, PhD, RN,

    Postdoctoral Fellow at the Division of Renal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Emory University

    Dr. Chicas is a bilingual and bicultural clinical scientist and a registered nurse with experience in occupational and environmental health, and nephrology. She is currently a postdoctoral researcher at Emory University. Her doctoral research focused on pilot testing cooling strategies in collaboration with agricultural workers. In the future, she hopes to continue to work to improve the health of underserved and vulnerable Latinx communities, particularly agricultural workers.

    June T. Spector, MD, MPH

    Director of Occupational & Environmental Medicine at the University of Washington and Assistant Chair for Occupational Medicine Partnerships in DEOHS

    Dr. Spector is a physician-scientist with a focus on the prevention and management of adverse health outcomes related to heat exposure and other climate-related hazards in working populations. She has been a faculty member at the University of Washington since 2012 and holds appointments in the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences (DEOHS) and Medicine (General Internal Medicine). She is the Director of Occupational & Environmental Medicine at the University of Washington and Assistant Chair for Occupational Medicine Partnerships in DEOHS.

  • Best PPE to Protect Your Lungs (March 31, 2021)

    Contains 10 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/31/2021

    Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge. Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education

    Summary:  Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge.  Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education
    Intended audience: The primary audience for this program will be rural health care providers, educators, and agribusiness safety managers
    Objectives (Focus areas): At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to: 
    1. List at least three sources of common agricultural respiratory hazards 
    2. Identify appropriate respiratory protection equipment for women working in agriculture 
    3. Access a minimum of three evidence- based resources for use in respiratory health and safety education for women working in agricultural environments.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Shari Franklin Smith, M. Eng and BS, Chemical Engineering

    3M, Lead Application Engineering Specialist for Food, Bev, Agriculture, Chemical & Construction Industry

    Shari Franklin Smith, CIH, CSP has 20+ years of experience helping to keep workers healthy and safe. She has worked with protective clothing including high visibility safety apparel and protective coveralls, and 9+ years of experience managing an organization of safety and health professionals supporting 3M’s PPE products such as hearing and respiratory protection, protective clothing, and fall protection and 3M™ Scotchlite™ Reflective Material. She has been involved in human factors research in visibility protective clothing and hearing conservation. She was also a member of the ISEA High Visibility Committee responsible for creating the ISEA/ANSI 107 standard and is the Secretary-Elect of the AIHA Construction Committee. Shari is currently supporting construction, chemical manufacturing, and the food and beverage industry as a lead application engineering specialist in 3M Personal Safety Division. She has helped several companies implement hearing protection fit testing, hosted multiple health and safety symposiums for the chemical, food and construction industries, and spoken on emerging health and safety concerns such as COVID-19, diacetyl in coffee processing, manganese hazards in welding, concerns for workers in legal cannabis growing, and changing regulations such as silica and beryllium.

  • Anhydrous Ammonia Safety for Farmworkers (March 31, 2021)

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/31/2021

    Anhydrous ammonia (NH3) is an effective nitrogen crop fertilizer used throughout the Midwest and beyond. Anhydrous ammonia is potentially dangerous, as it seeks water from the nearest source, which may be the human body – especially the eyes, lungs, and skin because of their high moisture content. Few problems occur when anhydrous ammonia is handled properly and applied as intended. However, it is important for all individuals working with this type of fertilizer to understand the potential health risks, necessary safety precautions, and proper response in the event of an exposure.

    Summary: Anhydrous ammonia (NH3) is an effective nitrogen crop fertilizer used throughout the Midwest and beyond.  Anhydrous ammonia is potentially dangerous, as it seeks water from the nearest source, which may be the human body – especially the eyes, lungs, and skin because of their high moisture content.  Few problems occur when anhydrous ammonia is handled properly and applied as intended.  However, it is important for all individuals working with this type of fertilizer to understand the potential health risks, necessary safety precautions, and proper response in the event of an exposure.

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is one of the last lines of defense for workers against Anhydrous Ammonia injuries. Women in all industries, including agriculture, have trouble finding and purchasing respiratory protective equipment that fits and is safe and comfortable wear. The National Safety Council, in a 2019 publication of Safety and Health, reported OSHA documentation indicating the lack of a full range of PPE, as well as, employers’ limited knowledge of PPE designed for women – as some of the reasons for the difficulty.  Focus of the training is on anhydrous ammonia safety during transport and application, including the anatomy of the nurse tank and toolbar, safety inspection processes, hitching and unhitching safety, personal protective equipment (PPE), rural roadway safety, and first aid/emergency procedures.  Hazard communication and emergency action plans will also be addressed.

    Intended Audience: Farm/Ranch owner and operators, health and safety professionals, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the conclusion of the program, participants will be able to...

    • Identify the anatomy of a nurse tank and toolbar
    • Choose appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE)
    • Make use of a safety inspection process
    • Describe safety measures to follow during anhydrous transport and application
    • Apply rural roadway safety measures
    • Describe hitching and unhitching safety
    • Plan and utilize basic first aid/emergency procedures
    • Locate hazard communication plan and emergency action plan resources

    This material was produced under grant number SH-99084-SH0 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Addressing Military Needs in Agriculture (March 17, 2021)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Veterans have a long history of service to our country through military service and through agriculture. The 2017 USDA report added a new special category of producers: “Producers with Military Service”. This report identified that 370,019 men and women agriculture producers claimed the title of US veteran, with 294,974 of them having spent more than 10 years on their farm. Recently much attention has highlighted veterans’ participation in farming. With this new attention, it is important to understand the unique characteristics and needs of those veterans

    Summary: Veterans have a long history of service to our country through military service and through agriculture. The 2017 USDA report added a new special category of producers: “Producers with Military Service”. This report identified that 370,019 men and women agriculture producers claimed the title of US veteran, with 294,974 of them having spent more than 10 years on their farm. Recently much attention has highlighted veterans’ participation in farming. With this new attention, it is important to understand the unique characteristics and needs of those veterans. 

    Registered nurses will be able address the needs of veteran farmers with a clearer understanding of the veteran experience compounded by the stress of farming and link veteran farmers to importance resources that support and build provider-client relationships and client resilience

    Objectives:
    The learner will be able to:

    • Outline the unique challenges that veterans face when returning from service to build a career in agriculture.
    • Utilize resources that are available to veterans that provide support for their unique challenges.

    Intended Audience
    All healthcare professionals, health and safety professionals, veteran healthcare administrators, farm/ranch owner and operators, public health, agricultural professionals working in academia, business or production, organizations working with veteran farmers, veterans and veteran groups. 


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    Continuing Nursing Education Information:
    • Faculty and planners of this educational activity have disclosed that they have NO conflicts of interests related to this program.
    • There will be NO discussion of off-label use of products for purposes other than what was approved by the FDA.
    • This program has NO commercial support
    • To receive the 1.0 contact hours, you must watch the entire program, complete and pass the post-test, complete the post-program evaluation.

    ​Dr. Crystal Kyle

    Biological Science Specialist in the Institute of Youth, Family, and Community (IYFC)

    Dr. Crystal Kyle serves as a Biological Science Specialist in the Institute of Youth, Family, and Community (IYFC). She provides programmatic grant support to competitive and non-competitive grant programs. As a military veteran who farms, one of her emphasis is on Military and Veteran Programs and scholarships, such as AgVet and Military Reimbursables. These include Military REACH, Military Family Learning Network, Virtual Lab School, Family Readiness, Yellow Ribbon, Substance Abuse, and Early Learning collaborations with Department of Defense. Other areas include Small and Medium Farm grants under Small Business Innovation Research. Dr. Kyle provides assistance in Beginner Farmer and Rancher, AgrAbility, 4-H, and 1890s Programs.  She holds a PhD in Agricultural, leadership and community development from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.