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  • The Impact of Climate-Related Hazards on Mental Health

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Extreme weather and climate events can lead to negative human health outcomes. Although the initial outcomes from these natural hazards are typically obvious, the long lasting impacts can be more difficult to identify because of the diversity of potential health burdens during the recovery phase. Mental health outcomes are one of the more complex relationships with natural hazards. The goal of this presentation is to build the link between human health and extreme weather and climate events. The discussion will be focused on rural populations.

    Summary: Extreme weather and climate events can lead to negative human health outcomes. Although the initial outcomes from these natural hazards are typically obvious, the long lasting impacts can be more difficult to identify because of the diversity of potential health burdens during the recovery phase. Mental health outcomes are one of the more complex relationships with natural hazards. The goal of this presentation is to build the link between human health and extreme weather and climate events. The discussion will be focused on rural populations.

    Intended Audience: farmers, ranchers, health and safety professionals, ag producers, agribusiness, rural mental health professionals

    Objectives: At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to.....

    - Describe the impact of climate on human health outcomes

    - Identify populations at risk for climate disasters

    - Better understand mechanisms of climate disasters

    - Understand the secondary health impacts from climate disasters

    - Explore the role that these issues play on mental health

    Thank you to our generous program sponsor:

    image

    Jesse E. Bell, Ph.D

    Claire M. Hubbard Professor of Health and Environment, Faculty Fellow, Daugherty Water For Food Global Institute, Department of Environmental, Agricultural, and Occupational Health, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center

    Dr. Jesse E. Bell is the Claire M. Hubbard Professor of Health and Environment in the Department of Environmental, Agricultural, and Occupational Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. His research explores the relationships of climate and extreme weather on natural and human processes. He served as a lead author for the U.S. Global Change Research Program report “The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A Scientific Assessment” that was released by the White House in 2016. Before coming to UNMC, Dr. Bell developed a joint position between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In this role, he led and coordinated a variety of projects related to climate impacts on human health. He also served on the White House OSTP Pandemic Prediction and Forecast Working Group. Dr. Bell is a Daugherty Water for Food Global Institute Faculty Fellow and adjunct faculty for the Department of Environmental Health at Emory University. His Ph.D. is from the University of Oklahoma.

  • Veteran Farmers: Reducing Noise Exposure & Protecting Your Health

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    Ag producers experience frequent exposure to high noise and have among the highest prevalence rates of hearing loss among all categories of workers. Additionally, noise exposure impacts multiple organ systems, contributing to cardiovascular disease, hypertension, obesity, and other highly prevalent diseases. Although the effects of noise can be mitigated through use of hearing protection and other strategies, these methods are highly underused in this worker group. In this Webinar designed for agricultural producers who are military veterans, learners will learn how to identify hazardous noise sources, strategies to reduce exposure to hazardous noise; and select and use of strategies to protect themselves from the negative effects of noise on their hearing and general health.

    Ag producers experience frequent exposure to high noise and have among the highest prevalence rates of hearing loss among all categories of workers. Additionally, noise exposure impacts multiple organ systems, contributing to cardiovascular disease, hypertension, obesity, and other highly prevalent diseases. Although the effects of noise can be mitigated through use of hearing protection and other strategies, these methods are highly underused in this worker group. In this Webinar designed for agricultural producers who are military veterans, learners will learn how to identify hazardous noise sources, strategies to reduce exposure to hazardous noise; and select and use of strategies to protect themselves from the negative effects of noise on their hearing and general health.

    Intended Audience: Military Veterans engaged in agricultural production

    Objectives:
    Upon completion of this training, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify harmful noise sources which have the potential to cause hearing damage and other health effects; 
    2. Identify strategies to reduce exposure to hazardous noise;
    3. Describe appropriate selection and use of personal protective equipment


    Thank you to our generous program sponsor:

    image

    Marjorie McCullagh, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC, COHN-S, FAAOHN, FAAN

    Professor and Occupational Health Nursing Program Director, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    Marjorie McCullagh is Professor in the School of Nursing. She holds a PhD in nursing from the University of Michigan and has 20 years of clinical, teaching, and research experience in hearing conservation. Dr. McCullagh's career has focused on occupational health and safety, particularly as it relates to use of personal protection devices among farm operators and their families. Since 1985 she has had an active program of research in mitigating hazardous occupational exposures. She has conducted several randomized clinical trials, comparing the effectiveness of several approaches to influencing use of personal protective equipment. Dr. McCullagh is an associate professor and Director of the Occupational Health Nursing program at the University of Michigan School of Nursing.

  • Farm and Ranch Health Threats After a Flood

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Disaster recovery can be as dangerous as the disaster itself, especially if no disaster preparedness plan was implemented. This is especially true on farms and ranches where inherent farm hazards such as machinery and equipment, livestock, and agriculture chemicals are displaced and co-mingle, putting all emergency response personnel, farm workers and family members in danger. Floods can heighten the risk of health threats such as mold, tetanus bacteria, contaminated well water, heat illness and high stress. This presentation will highlight basic precautions to prevent possible diseases and injuries during and after flooding.

    Summary: Disaster recovery can be as dangerous as the disaster itself, especially if no disaster preparedness plan was implemented. This is especially true on farms and ranches where inherent farm hazards such as machinery and equipment, livestock, and agriculture chemicals are displaced and co-mingle, putting all emergency response personnel, farm workers and family members in danger. Floods can heighten the risk of health threats such as mold, tetanus bacteria, contaminated well water, heat illness and high stress. This presentation will highlight basic precautions to prevent possible diseases and injuries during and after flooding.

    Objectives: At the end of the presentation, attendees will be able to: 

    - Identify common human health risks faced during a farm flood. 

    - Discuss prevention tips and injury prevention for common human health risks. 

    - Identify special considerations for working with livestock during a weather event. 

    - Discuss steps involved in developing a disaster preparedness plan and how to safety active a response. 

    - Discuss appropriate respiratory personal protective equipment needed during flood recovery. 

    - Identify warning signs for behavioral and mental health during and after recovery.

    Intended Audience: All individuals living/working on farms and ranches affected by flooding.


    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

    Rebecca S. McConnico, DVM

    Professor at Louisiana Tech University, Veterinarian

    Dr. McConnico is originally from north central Ohio, where she lived for 18 years. She obtained her BS in Animal Science from the University of Arkansas, her DVM from Louisiana State University, and her PhD and clinical residency in large animal internal medicine from North Carolina State University. She is board certified in the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (LA) and her clinical interests include equine critical care and internal medicine. The long term goals of Dr. McConnico’s research collaborations are elucidating the pathophysiologic mechanisms associated with intestinal diseases in horses, determining the link between these diseases and other related abnormalities (eg. laminitis, endotoxemia, myositis), with the broader intention of preventing, attenuating, and determining effective treatment modalities for these life-threatening conditions. 

    Kevin Moore, PhD, MBA, ASP

    Assistant Professor of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler

    Dr. Moore is an Assistant Professor of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler. He completed his PhD in Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering at Oklahoma State University. His research interests involve protecting the safety and health of agricultural workers, especially related to respiratory issues and the storage and handling of agricultural products. Dr. Moore serves the Southwest Center for Agricultural Health, Injury Prevention and Education as principal investigator for the pilot/feasibility studies core. He is also the Responsible Official for the Public Health Laboratory of East Texas.

    Alexander Nguyen, DO

    Occupational and Environmental Medicine Resident PGY-3 at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler

    Born in Lubbock, Texas to two Vietnamese immigrant parents and raised most of my life in Houston, Texas. Majored in Biology and minored in Chemistry at the University of Houston. Completed medical school at the University of North Texas Health Science Center Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine. Completed an internship at Garnet Health Medical Center in upstate New York. Currently completing my second and final year of Occupational and Environmental Medicine residency at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler. My current research involves working with commercial fishermen in the Gulf of Mexico to understand the dangers of falling overboard and the barriers to performing research during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Reducing the Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Perinatal Illness for Female Ag. Producers (August 27, 2020)

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges.

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges. 

    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

         1. Identify unique exposures/risks associated with farm tasks.

         2. Identify at least four reproductive health and safety issues for women. 

        3. Locate three current evidenced based resources in the field of agricultural health 

        4. Develop Hazard Map of work exposures.

        5. Select appropriate PPE for farm tasks to reduce or eliminate exposures and or risks.

    Intended Audience:

    Supervisor or Managers: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators,  health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Producers: This training is intended primarily for agricultural producers including but not limited to farmers, ranchers, and any person or persons involved in some combination of raising field crops, orchards, vineyards, horticulture, or other livestock.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Ergonomic Safety for Farm Women (August 19, 2020)

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    It is no secret - women are playing an increased role in production agriculture. They account for about one-third of the management, ownership and work on farms, ranches and in crop production. A major challenge continues to be access to protective equipment that meets the ergonomic needs of women. This program is intended to help women in rural/agricultural communities identify ergonomic issues leading to musculoskeletal injuries in farm and ranch work and discover resources to aid in injury prevention.

    It is no secret - women are playing an increased role in production agriculture. They account for about one-third of the management, ownership and work on farms, ranches and in crop production. A major challenge continues to be access to protective equipment that meets the ergonomic needs of women. This program is intended to help women in rural/agricultural communities identify ergonomic issues leading to musculoskeletal injuries in farm and ranch work and discover resources to aid in injury prevention.

    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

    1. Identify work site hazards and potential musculoskeletal injuries.

    2. Identify wellness initiatives aimed at reducing risks related to musculoskeletal injuries.

    3. Locate three current evidenced based resources in the field of agricultural health and safety that address ergonomic safety.

    4. Utilize the individual AgHRA to look at current exposures and preventive methods for daily farm tasks. 

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte Halverson is an occupational health nurse for the AgriSafe Network and serves as the network’s Clinical Director. In that capacity, she researches, develops resources, and presents webinar and in person educational sessions on a variety of health and safety topics specific to the agricultural workforce. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Mental Health in Farm and Ranch Country: How Communities Can Help!

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/30/2020

    In rural communities, the stigma associated with mental distress is hard to confront. Rural agricultural residents pride themselves as hard-working and dedicated to the land. These characteristics are sometimes in direct conflict with asking for help and self-care, leaving those around them at a loss for words and action. This presentation attempts to use the strengths of rural- self-reliance of communities and being a good neighbor- to frame the conversation of mental health and mental distress. Approaches to community assessment, community resources, and effective training programs to help rural residents craft solutions to grow a community network of mental health neighbors will be shared.

    In rural communities, the stigma associated with mental distress is hard to confront. Rural agricultural residents pride themselves as hard-working and dedicated to the land. These characteristics are sometimes in direct conflict with asking for help and self-care, leaving those around them at a loss for words and action. This presentation attempts to use the strengths of rural- self-reliance of communities and being a good neighbor- to frame the conversation of mental health and mental distress. Approaches to community assessment, community resources, and effective training programs to help rural residents craft solutions to grow a community network of mental health neighbors will be shared.

    Intended Audience: Community members, agricultural producers, farmworkers, community leaders

    Objectives: At the end of this presentation participants will be able to-

    1. Identify two barriers as it relates to their community regarding mental health services and conversations among rural residents.

    2. Name three signs that signal mental distress in agricultural residents.

    3. Implement at least two statements or questions that can open conversation with someone you suspect is experiencing mental distress.

    4. Name a community-based mental health training that can be implemented to expand your community network of mental health neighbors. 


    Thank you to our generous program sponsors:

    Federal Office of Rural Health Policy

    imageimage

    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

  • Respiratory Fit Testing in Agricultural Communities (June 24, 2020)

    Contains 8 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/24/2020

    Respiratory PPE fit testing helps assure the best protection against dangerous airborne particles. Agricultural workers face a myriad of challenges in obtaining a proper fit test and who can provide this service. Additionally, there are gray areas of misunderstanding about the fit testing mandates in certain agricultural populations.

    Summary
    Respiratory PPE fit testing helps assure the best protection against dangerous airborne particles. Agricultural workers face a myriad of challenges in obtaining a proper fit test and who can provide this service. Additionally, there are gray areas of misunderstanding about the fit testing mandates in certain agricultural populations. 
    Intended Audience:  Agricultural workers, including women in agriculture; managers and owners of agricultural businesses; educational and healthcare organizations serving an agricultural population.
    Objectives
    Upon completion of this webinar, participants in this webinar will : 
     - understand the difference between a respirator fit test and a fit check (seal check) procedure
     - determine who should be fit tested for respiratory personal protective equipment (PPE) 
     - know who can perform a fit test what tools are necessary for a fit test procedure
     - locate current reliable resources that provide information on respiratory fit testing

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte Halverson is an occupational health nurse for the AgriSafe Network and serves as the network’s Clinical Director. In that capacity, she researches, develops resources, and presents webinar and in person educational sessions on a variety of health and safety topics specific to the agricultural workforce. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Hazard Communications Standards (June 17, 2020)

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    This Hazard Communication Standard training program is intended for female workers and managers in the agricultural industry. This includes dairy farms and small farms that hire at-risk populations. The major focus of the program is on the identification of and the safe usage of chemicals and pesticides, along with respiratory protection.

    This Hazard Communication Standard training program is intended for female workers and managers in the agricultural industry. This includes dairy farms and small farms that hire at-risk populations. The major focus of the program is on the identification of and the safe usage of chemicals and pesticides, along with respiratory protection.
    At the conclusion of the training, participants will be able to: 
    1. Describe the purpose of OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HCS)
    2. Explain the basic requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard
    3. Differentiate between physical and health hazards of agricultural chemicals
    4. Recall the requirements of a written hazard communication program
    5. List the components of a hazard communication training program
    6. Interpret the information contained in Safety Data Sheets (SDS)
    7. Describe the requirements and purpose of hazard warning labels.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Eliminating Workplace Violence in the Field for Employers (June 10, 2020)

    Contains 6 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/10/2020

    Thirty-six percent of the 3.4 million producers counted in the census are women. Education will focus on all women including farmworker women and their employers on reporting violent incidents to authorities, making employees aware of their legal rights, safe work practices, medical referrals, treatment, and options including counseling if needed. Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Thirty-six percent of the 3.4 million producers counted in the census are women. Education will focus on all women including farmworker women and their employers on reporting violent incidents to authorities, making employees aware of their legal rights, safe work practices, medical referrals, treatment, and options including counseling if needed.
    Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators,  health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting. 
    Objectives Upon completion of this webinar, participants will understand the following concepts:
    1. The scope and nature of workplace violence occurring in agriculture today.
    2. Employers' responsibilities in addressing workplace violence and implementing preventive measures.
    3. Effective strategies and interventions that can make the workplace safer and more responsive to employee-victims.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Best PPE to Protect Your Lungs (June 4, 2020)

    Contains 10 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/04/2020

    Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge. Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education

    Summary:  Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge.  Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education
    Intended audience: The primary audience for this program will be rural health care providers, educators, and agribusiness safety managers
    Objectives (Focus areas): At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to: 
    1. List at least three sources of common agricultural respiratory hazards 
    2. Identify appropriate respiratory protection equipment for women working in agriculture 
    3. Access a minimum of three evidence- based resources for use in respiratory health and safety education for women working in agricultural environments.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte Halverson is an occupational health nurse for the AgriSafe Network and serves as the network’s Clinical Director. In that capacity, she researches, develops resources, and presents webinar and in person educational sessions on a variety of health and safety topics specific to the agricultural workforce. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.