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  • CNE- Addressing Military Needs in Agriculture (March 17, 2021)

    Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 03/17/2021 at 12:00 PM (CDT)

    Veterans have a long history of service to our country through military service and through agriculture. The 2017 USDA report added a new special category of producers: “Producers with Military Service”. This report identified that 370,019 men and women agriculture producers claimed the title of US veteran, with 294,974 of them having spent more than 10 years on their farm. Recently much attention has highlighted veterans’ participation in farming. With this new attention, it is important to understand the unique characteristics and needs of those veterans

    Summary: Veterans have a long history of service to our country through military service and through agriculture. The 2017 USDA report added a new special category of producers: “Producers with Military Service”. This report identified that 370,019 men and women agriculture producers claimed the title of US veteran, with 294,974 of them having spent more than 10 years on their farm. Recently much attention has highlighted veterans’ participation in farming. With this new attention, it is important to understand the unique characteristics and needs of those veterans. 

    Registered nurses will be able address the needs of veteran farmers with a clearer understanding of the veteran experience compounded by the stress of farming and link veteran farmers to importance resources that support and build provider-client relationships and client resilience

    Objectives:
    The learner will be able to:

    • Outline the unique challenges that veterans face when returning from service to build a career in agriculture.
    • Utilize resources that are available to veterans that provide support for their unique challenges.

    Intended Audience
    All healthcare professionals, health and safety professionals, veteran healthcare administrators, farm/ranch owner and operators, public health, agricultural professionals working in academia, business or production, organizations working with veteran farmers, veterans and veteran groups. 


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    ​Dr. Crystal Kyle

    Biological Science Specialist in the Institute of Youth, Family, and Community (IYFC)

    Dr. Crystal Kyle serves as a Biological Science Specialist in the Institute of Youth, Family, and Community (IYFC). She provides programmatic grant support to competitive and non-competitive grant programs. As a military veteran who farms, one of her emphasis is on Military and Veteran Programs and scholarships, such as AgVet and Military Reimbursables. These include Military REACH, Military Family Learning Network, Virtual Lab School, Family Readiness, Yellow Ribbon, Substance Abuse, and Early Learning collaborations with Department of Defense. Other areas include Small and Medium Farm grants under Small Business Innovation Research. Dr. Kyle provides assistance in Beginner Farmer and Rancher, AgrAbility, 4-H, and 1890s Programs.  She holds a PhD in Agricultural, leadership and community development from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

  • Tools for Healthcare Professionals Working in Agricultural Communities (February 19, 2021)

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    In this webinar, attendees will learn about tools they can make use to enhance healthcare services for their farming and ranching patients. Alex Cavanaugh from the Rural Health Information Hub (RHIhub) will provide a general overview of services including: Rural Response Issue Guides for COVID-19, Farmer Mental Health and Suicide Prevention resources, and the Agricultural Health and Safety Topic Guide. Sarah Dauterive of AgriSafe Network will introduce MedlinePlus and its uses for healthcare professionals.

    Summary: In this webinar, attendees will learn about tools they can make use to enhance healthcare services for their farming and ranching patients. Alex Cavanaugh from the Rural Health Information Hub (RHIhub) will provide a general overview of services including: Rural Response Issue Guides for COVID-19, Farmer Mental Health and Suicide Prevention resources, and the Agricultural Health and Safety Topic Guide. Sarah Dauterive of AgriSafe Network will introduce MedlinePlus and its uses for healthcare professionals.

    Objectives: At the conclusion of the program, participants will be able to...

    1. Recognize RHIhub as a resource for understanding rural health and Ag issues
    2. Navigate the RHIhub for specific materials to respond to rural health needs
    3. Increase understanding of MedlinePLus features and how to use them

    Intended Audience: Healthcare Professionals working with farmers and ranchers

    Funded under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012345 with the University of North Texas Health Science Center - Gibson D. Lewis Library, and awarded by the DHHS, NIH, National Library of Medicine.

    Alex Cavanaugh, MA

    Information Specialist, Rural Health Information Hub

    Alex Cavanaugh is an information specialist for the Rural Health Information Hub (RHIhub). In this position, he writes and maintains topic and state guides, adds new resources to the RHIhub website, and provides customized assistance through the Resource and Referral Service. He earned both a bachelor of arts and master of arts degrees in English from the University of North Dakota. He also holds a graduate certificate in nonprofit management from the University of Oregon and is currently working toward a PhD in English.

    Sarah Dauterive, MLIS

    Web Technologies Specialist, AgriSafe Network

    Sarah is the Web Technologies Librarian for AgriSafe Network. She is the project lead for the AgriSafe Health Hub, AgriSafe’s database of health information and services for the agricultural community. Through the Health Hub and her work at AgriSafe, Sarah connects the AgriSafe community with quality health information, services, and tools. She has a bachelor of arts degree in History from Mississippi State University and a Master of Library and Information Studies degree from the University of Alabama.

  • Dispelling Misinformation about the COVID19 Vaccine: What Agricultural Producers Need to Know (February 12, 2021)

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are very effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Now that there are authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, accurate vaccine information is critical. COVID-19 vaccination will be an important tool to help stop the pandemic. None of the COVID-19 vaccines contain the live virus that causes COVID-19 so a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19. While more COVID-19 vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible, routine processes and procedures remain in place to ensure the safety of any vaccine that is authorized or approved for use. Safety is a top priority, and there are many reasons to get vaccinated. Dr. Lisa Morici will talk about how the vaccines have been developed, the safety and efficacy information from clinical trials, and why vaccination works to help stop the spread of COVID-19. Natalie Roy will explain why those who work in agriculture are considered essential workers and may receive prioritization in accessing the vaccine. Please join us in this important webinar so together we can reduce the spread of misinformation and help agricultural communities access the Covid-19 vaccine.

    Summary: Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are very effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Now that there are authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, accurate vaccine information is critical. COVID-19 vaccination will be an important tool to help stop the pandemic. While more COVID-19 vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible, routine processes and procedures remain in place to ensure the safety of any vaccine that is authorized or approved for use. Safety is a top priority, and there are many reasons to get vaccinated.

    Dr. Lisa Morici will talk about how the vaccines have been developed, the safety and efficacy information from clinical trials, and why vaccination works to help stop the spread of COVID-19. Natalie Roy will explain why those who work in agriculture are considered essential workers and may receive prioritization in accessing the vaccine. Please join us in this important webinar so together we can reduce the spread of misinformation and help agricultural communities access the Covid-19 vaccine.

    Intended Audience: Agriculture producers, safety and health professionals, health care providers, other people working in agriculture.

    Funded under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012345 with the University of North Texas Health Science Center - Gibson D. Lewis Library, and awarded by the DHHS, NIH, National Library of Medicine.

    Lisa Morici, PhD

    Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tulane University

    Tulane University

    Dr. Lisa Morici is a tenured Associate Professor in the Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology at Tulane University School of Medicine. Her research program focuses on the development of next generation vaccines for biodefense and emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases. Dr. Morici has successfully moved candidate vaccines from the discovery stage to planned phase 1 clinical trials. Her vaccine research program is currently supported by the National Institutes of Health and the Dept. of Defense.

    Natalie Roy, MPH

    AgriSafe Executive Director

    As Executive Director of AgriSafe for over twenty years, Natalie Roy utilizes her public health training to improve the quality of health care offered to farm families. Natalie holds a Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She is pleased to work in the area of agricultural health as it relates to her experience growing up on a farm in Canterbury New Hampshire.

  • Invest in Your Health: Prevention of Zoonotic Diseases (January 20, 2021)

    Contains 7 Component(s)

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agricultural producers are at high risk for acquiring a zoonotic disease related to their work environment with minimal information related to risks, symptoms and prevention. The majority of emerging infectious diseases in the U.S. are zoonotic in nature. They are often difficult to determine and many go unreported for a variety of reasons.

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agricultural producers are at high risk for acquiring a zoonotic disease related to their work environment with minimal information related to risks, symptoms and prevention. The majority of emerging infectious diseases in the U.S. are zoonotic in nature. They are often difficult to determine and many go unreported for a variety of reasons.
    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
    1. Define zoonotic disease and identify various modes of transmission; 
    2. Locate recommended educational resources for use in educational programs; 
    3. Discuss warning signs and symptoms of major zoonotic diseases; 
    4. Identify zoonotic diseases affecting the production agricultural population

    Invest in Your Health is supported by:

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    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett has her BS in Molecular Biology from Defiance College, MS in Environmental Toxicology from Texas Tech University, and is currently a DVM candidate at Michigan State University. Her passion for public health began during a water testing project in Tanzania, Africa and has continued to evolve and include research focused on wildlife diseases and vector-borne zoonoses. Katelyn also served as a member of the AgriSafe Young Advisors Council, from 2016-2017. In her role as a rural leader, she assisted AgriSafe in design and launching of educational initiatives that can reduce farm related illness, injury and fatalities.

  • Reducing the Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Perinatal Illness for Female Ag. Producers (December 16, 2020)

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges.

    Pregnancy and fertility are often not considered when women assume farm tasks. Pesticide and other chemical exposures, zoonotic diseases and heavy lifting particularly during childbearing years, present challenges. 

    At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

         1. Identify unique exposures/risks associated with farm tasks.

         2. Identify at least four reproductive health and safety issues for women. 

        3. Locate three current evidenced based resources in the field of agricultural health 

        4. Develop Hazard Map of work exposures.

        5. Select appropriate PPE for farm tasks to reduce or eliminate exposures and or risks.

    Intended Audience:

    Supervisor or Managers: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators,  health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Producers: This training is intended primarily for agricultural producers including but not limited to farmers, ranchers, and any person or persons involved in some combination of raising field crops, orchards, vineyards, horticulture, or other livestock.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Prevention of Covid-19 Among the Agricultural Industry – Contact Tracing

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and associated coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has profoundly affected humans on a global scale in a noticeably short time. Individuals working in agriculture who, as “essential workers", are exempt from stay-home mandates, and are naturally at increased risk of negative health, economic, social, and familial consequences from the on-going COVID-19 pandemic. Language and cultural differences, rural geographies, socioeconomic pressures, and immigration status are among the barriers that impede agricultural workers access to critical education and prevention technologies emerging to combat COVID-19. Additionally, the unusual persistence and multimodal transmission cycle of SARS-CoV-2 emerging from ongoing scientific study may require customization of otherwise standard prevention messaging to agricultural workers to further prevent infection and disease exacerbation.

    Summary: The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and associated coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has profoundly affected humans on a global scale in a noticeably short time. Individuals working in agriculture who, as “essential workers", are exempt from stay-home mandates, and are naturally at increased risk of negative health, economic, social, and familial consequences from the on-going COVID-19 pandemic. Language and cultural differences, rural geographies, socioeconomic pressures, and immigration status are among the barriers that impede agricultural workers access to critical education and prevention technologies emerging to combat COVID-19. Additionally, the unusual persistence and multimodal transmission cycle of SARS-CoV-2 emerging from ongoing scientific study may require customization of otherwise standard prevention messaging to agricultural workers to further prevent infection and disease exacerbation.

    Contact tracing is a tool that can help slow the spread of infectious diseases, such as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Contact tracing helps protect you and your employees by: Letting people know they may have been exposed to COVID-19 and should monitor their health for signs and symptoms of COVID-19. Helping people who may have been exposed to COVID-19 get tested, self-quarantine or isolate to prevent spread of disease (CDC).

    Intended Audience: Farm/Ranch owner and operators, health and safety professionals, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the conclusion of the program, participants will be able to...

    1. Explain the importance of COVID-19 occurrence, distribution and control for agricultural safety. 
    2. Understand how COVID-19 particularly impacts rural areas. 
    3. Identify ways to limit the spread of COVID-19 in an agricultural work environment through contact tracing.
    4. Document at least three evidence based resources on COVID-19 safety in the workplace.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-99084-SH0 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Emma Bergqvist

    Public Health Analyst, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Emma is a second year MPH candidate at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine with a concentration in Epidemiology. She has a Bachelor's degree in Biology, with a minor in Health Policy and Administration. Through her studies she has developed a passion for infectious diseases and public health, both of which she uses in her role as Public Health Analyst at AgriSafe. She critically analyzes emerging health threats that impact the health of agricultural producers. Emma provides data analysis of agricultural health issues, finds practical solutions, and reports statistical and analytical outcomes to stakeholders.

  • Invest in Your Health: Cover Up! Head to Toe Personal Protective Equipment (December 15, 2020)

    Contains 7 Component(s)

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agriculture is ranked as one of the most dangerous occupations and involves workers and family members of all ages. Illness and injuries can be prevented if we use the right protective equipment for the job. This program will present an overview of common exposures in farming and ranching and identify appropriate personal protective equipment.

    This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults. Agriculture is ranked as one of the most dangerous occupations and involves workers and family members of all ages. Illness and injuries can be prevented if we use the right protective equipment for the job. This program will present an overview of common exposures in farming and ranching and identify appropriate personal protective equipment.
    At the conclusion of the program, participants/educators will be able to: 
    1. Review several of the indicators related to use of personal protective equipment (PPE) in agriculture 
    2. Access personal protective (PPE) educational material developed for classroom use
    3. Select decision making activities from programs designed for classroom time frames
    4. Identify safety and health resources for use in educational settings

    Invest in Your Health is supported by:

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    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte Halverson is an occupational health nurse for the AgriSafe Network and serves as the network’s Clinical Director. In that capacity, she researches, develops resources, and presents webinar and in person educational sessions on a variety of health and safety topics specific to the agricultural workforce. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Invest In Your Health - Train the Trainer Course

    Contains 33 Component(s)

    AgriSafe is offering this Train-the-Trainer series to anyone who works with youth (ages 14-23 years). The series of modules will walk you through 6 target areas and includes an instructor guide after completing each topic.

    AgriSafe offers Invest in Your Health Trainer Exchange where educators can be certified to train on six AgriSafe modules (targeted for ages 14-23). AgriSafe provides the course instruction and training materials. Under our open share platform, once certified, educators would be free to use the training materials in their classroom setting. Our end goal is to build the capacity of local agricultural educators, rural health professionals and rural leaders to train young workers.  

    Currently, AgriSafe offers six training modules:   

    1. Say What? Protecting your Hearing
    2. Cover Up! Head to Toe Personal Protective Equipment
    3. Stay Cool! Prevention of Heat Related Illness
    4. Stop Zoonosis it its Tracks- Prevention of Zoonosis
    5. Where Y’at-Using Mapping to Define Hazards in Agriculture
    6. Cultivating a Healthy Mind: Mental Wellness for Youth

    Utilizing an open share curriculum model, AgriSafe is expanding access to ag safety and health curriculum to a wide variety of health and safety instructors including parents, teachers and employers.  This curriculum built with a classroom audience in mind, has been utilized in a variety of ways to train youth and new employees in agriculture alike..

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

    Invest in Your Health is supported by:

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    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

    Natalie Roy, MPH

    AgriSafe Executive Director

    As Executive Director of AgriSafe for over twenty years, Natalie Roy utilizes her public health training to improve the quality of health care offered to farm families. Natalie holds a Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She is pleased to work in the area of agricultural health as it relates to her experience growing up on a farm in Canterbury New Hampshire.

    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

    Marjorie McCullagh, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC, COHN-S, FAAOHN, FAAN

    Professor and Occupational Health Nursing Program Director, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    Marjorie McCullagh is Professor in the School of Nursing. She holds a PhD in nursing from the University of Michigan and has 20 years of clinical, teaching, and research experience in hearing conservation. Dr. McCullagh's career has focused on occupational health and safety, particularly as it relates to use of personal protection devices among farm operators and their families. Since 1985 she has had an active program of research in mitigating hazardous occupational exposures. She has conducted several randomized clinical trials, comparing the effectiveness of several approaches to influencing use of personal protective equipment. Dr. McCullagh is an associate professor and Director of the Occupational Health Nursing program at the University of Michigan School of Nursing.

    Linda Emanuel, RN

    Community Health Nurse, AgriSafe Network

    Good health advocacy has been at the heart of Linda’s essence from her formative years as a farm girl in eastern Nebraska. Graduating from Nebraska Methodist School of Nursing in 1985, she worked as an R.N. in a variety of acute care hospital settings for over 30 years. She and her husband Tom raised three sons on a successful row crop operation that has been able to welcome the next generation and their families home to continue to diversify their family business. Linda served as a Fellow in the Nebraska LEAD program and has also received agrimedicine training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Linda now serves on the advisory board for CS-CASH and a member of the AgriSafe team, as a Community Health Nurse.

    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett has her BS in Molecular Biology from Defiance College, MS in Environmental Toxicology from Texas Tech University, and is currently a DVM candidate at Michigan State University. Her passion for public health began during a water testing project in Tanzania, Africa and has continued to evolve and include research focused on wildlife diseases and vector-borne zoonoses. Katelyn also served as a member of the AgriSafe Young Advisors Council, from 2016-2017. In her role as a rural leader, she assisted AgriSafe in design and launching of educational initiatives that can reduce farm related illness, injury and fatalities.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte Halverson is an occupational health nurse for the AgriSafe Network and serves as the network’s Clinical Director. In that capacity, she researches, develops resources, and presents webinar and in person educational sessions on a variety of health and safety topics specific to the agricultural workforce. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Invest in Your Health: Cultivating a Healthy Mind (December 3, 2020)

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Stigma exists across all age groups for those struggling with mental health. Navigation of the teen years in everyday situations can create angst and uncomfortable feelings that are difficult to express. Adding mental illness and mental crisis to a teen or young adult’s typical growth and development makes struggling with emotions, relationships, academic success, and safety more challenging. According to the CDC, rates of depression and anxiety climb significantly during the ages of 12-17. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youths in the United States. This module opens an introductory discussion of mental health among teens and young adults with guidance from an adult educator. Focus is placed on decreasing stigma, improving mental health literacy, and positive coping skills for teens and young adults. The module showcases a high school agricultural student’s understanding of the agricultural mental health crisis, helping to frame mental health distress to academic and future career success.

    Summary: Stigma exists across all age groups for those struggling with mental health. Navigation of the teen years in everyday situations can create angst and uncomfortable feelings that are difficult to express. Adding mental illness and mental crisis to a teen or young adult’s typical growth and development makes struggling with emotions, relationships, academic success, and safety more challenging. According to the CDC, rates of depression and anxiety climb significantly during the ages of 12-17. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youths in the United States. This module opens an introductory discussion of mental health among teens and young adults with guidance from an adult educator. Focus is placed on decreasing stigma, improving mental health literacy, and positive coping skills for teens and young adults. The module showcases a high school agricultural student’s understanding of the agricultural mental health crisis, helping to frame mental health distress to academic and future career success. 

     Objectives: After the module, teens and young adults will be able to....

    1. Understand the relationship of mental health to physical health and academic or career success 
    2. Recognize basic signs or symptoms that present when young adults experience mental stress 
    3. Identify healthy and unhealthy coping behaviors when faced with mental distress 
    4. Communicate their concerns when suspecting they or someone they know is experiencing a mental health crisis 

    Intended Audience: This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults.



    Invest in Your Health is supported by:

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    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

  • Farm Theater: A Unique Approach to Health and Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Farm Dinner Theater is an award winning intervention that is changing the actions of farm families for their health and safety. Based on a four year NIOSH research project, Dr. Reed will walk the audience through the development, history, evaluation and evolution of the Farm Dinner Theater. Since the research project ended communities have used the free toolkit to guide them in hosting their own theaters.

    Summary: Farm Dinner Theater is an award winning intervention that is changing the actions of farm families for their health and safety. Based on a four year NIOSH research project, Dr. Reed will walk the audience through the development, history, evaluation and evolution of the Farm Dinner Theater. Since the research project ended communities have used the free toolkit to guide them in hosting their own theaters.

    Intended audience: Anyone working in service to farm populations or other community groups.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar participants will be able to-

    • Describe the history and concepts of didactic readers’ theater 
    • Apply theater to their specific audience 
    • Apply techniques for engaging community to support the theater

    Deborah B. Reed, MSPH, PhD, RN, FAAOHN, FAAN

    Professor of Extension Community Health and Safety, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, College of Nursing

    Debbie grew up on family farm in Kentucky just a few miles from the University of Kentucky. She is currently the Extension Professor of Community Health and Safety at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, affectionately known as the Ag Nurse. For the past 29 years Dr. Reed has worked with farm families throughout the nation to promote their health and prevent the many injuries that are so common in this occupation. She has developed and tested health education programs for children and youth on farms, and is upscaling the Farm Dinner Theater, a didactic readers’ theater for the farmer populations. The program that was designated as an Edge Runner by the America Academy of Nursing and is currently funded by the Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation. Dr. Reed is recognized internationally for her work on farm health and safety and farm family stress and suicide prevention. She loves communing with nature, , horses, angus cattle, and smelling newly mown hay.