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  • Discovering the Root of your Back Story – Prevention and Understanding of Back Injuries

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/25/2020

    Back injuries are one of the most common forms of farm-related injuries, so protecting the back is one of the most important things a producer can do to stay active on the farm. Men and women are both prone to work-related back pain and the first episode usually occurs between the ages of 20 and 40. Training will focus on effects of whole body vibration, causes of back injuries/pain, how to prevent back injuries/pain, and other considerations. Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Back injuries are one of the most common forms of farm-related injuries, so protecting the back is one of the most important things a producer can do to stay active on the farm. Men and women are both prone to work-related back pain and the first episode usually occurs between the ages of 20 and 40. Training will focus on effects of whole body vibration, causes of back injuries/pain, how to prevent back injuries/pain, and other considerations.
    Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting. 
    Objectives:
    Upon completion of this training, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify causes of back injuries/pain
    2. Explain and utilize strategies to prevent back injuries/pain
    3. Describe and utilize proper lifting techniques
    4. Describe effects of whole body vibration (WBV)
    5. Apply strategies for maintaining back health
    6. Recall ways to manage chronic pain

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 


    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

    Linda Emanuel, RN

    Community Health Nurse, AgriSafe Network

    Good health advocacy has been at the heart of Linda’s essence from her formative years as a farm girl in eastern Nebraska. Graduating from Nebraska Methodist School of Nursing in 1985, she worked as an R.N. in a variety of acute care hospital settings for over 30 years. She and her husband Tom raised three sons on a successful row crop operation that has been able to welcome the next generation and their families home to continue to diversify their family business. Linda served as a Fellow in the Nebraska LEAD program and has also received agrimedicine training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Linda now serves on the advisory board for CS-CASH and a member of the AgriSafe team, as a Community Health Nurse.

  • Safety in the Field: Addressing Workplace Sexual Harassment for Farm Workers

    Contains 5 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/25/2020

    Thirty-six percent of the 3.4 million producers counted in the census are women. Education will focus on all women including farmworker women and their employers on reporting violent incidents to authorities, making employees aware of their legal rights, safe work practices, medical referrals, treatment, and options including counseling if needed. Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Thirty-six percent of the 3.4 million producers counted in the census are women. Education will focus on all women including farmworker women and their employers on reporting violent incidents to authorities, making employees aware of their legal rights, safe work practices, medical referrals, treatment, and options including counseling if needed.
    Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators,  health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting. 
    Objectives Upon completion of this webinar, participants will understand the following concepts:
    1. The scope and nature of workplace violence occurring in agriculture today.
    2. Employers' responsibilities in addressing workplace violence and implementing preventive measures.
    3. Effective strategies and interventions that can make the workplace safer and more responsive to employee-victims.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

    Dennise Drury

    Dennise Drury is an MPH Student in Environmental Health and the Outreach and Education Specialist for the Pacific Northwest Agricultural Health and Safety Center. As an student, she is currently working on evaluating the Basta! Prevent Sexual Harassment in Agriculture curriculum and training video with trainers and farmworkers. At the PNASH Center, she works in collaboration with researchers, community organizations, and agricultural stakeholders to develop and promote resources for workplace health and safety.  She is a bicultural and bilingual Latina from Texas and has passion for increasing the inclusivity and accessibility of science and research for Latino communities.

    Jody Early, Ph.D., M.S., MCHES

    Associate Professor, Faculty Coordinator, Health Education and Promotion Minor, School of Nursing and Health Studies, University of Washington Bothell

    Dr. Jody Early is an Associate Professor of Health Studies and an affiliate faculty in Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies and the Pacific Northwest Agriculture Safety and Health Center at the University of Washington Bothell and Seattle campuses. She currently serves as lead faculty for the Health Education and Promotion minor in the School of Nursing and Health Studies and is a former Associate Director of UW Bothell’s Teaching and Learning Center.

     Over the last 25 years, Jody has dedicated her life to improving health equity and higher education. A Master Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES), Jody’s research, teaching and praxis largely explore structural and social ecological factors that impact the health and well-being of individuals and populations, especially among women and Latinx communities. Her work, both in and outside of the academy, has allowed her to collaborate with communities to design, implement, and evaluate, culturally tailored health education interventions and strategies, and to involve her students in the process.

  • Respiratory Protection Issues in Agriculture - What to Wear & Does It Fit?

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    The business of agriculture presents a myriad of hazards, including exposures to dusts, molds, pesticides and other chemicals, gases, as well as welding fumes and particles. Deciding what protection to use to prevent acute and chronic respiratory diseases is confusing. In addition, just finding the right protective gear can be a challenge. This webinar will address those issues and provide information on the importance of fit testing and fit (seal)checks. Intended Audience: agricultural production workers, including female workers, and agricultural business managers

    The business of agriculture presents a myriad of hazards, including exposures to dusts, molds, pesticides and other chemicals, gases, as well as welding fumes and particles. Deciding what protection to use to prevent acute and chronic respiratory diseases is confusing. In addition, just finding the right protective gear can be a challenge. This webinar will address those issues and provide information on the importance of fit testing and fit (seal)checks.

    Intended Audience: agricultural production workers, including female workers, and agricultural business managers

    At the end of this webinar participants will be able to: 1. Identify appropriate respiratory protection equipment for work in agriculture
    2. Understand the difference between a respirator fit test and a fit check (seal check) procedure.
    3. Determine who should be fit tested for respiratory personal protective equipment (PPE)
    4. Know who can perform a fit test and what tools are necessary for a fit test procedure
    5. Locate current reliable resources that provide information on respiratory PPE

    Thank you to our generous program sponsors:

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    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte Halverson is an occupational health nurse for the AgriSafe Network and serves as the network’s Clinical Director. In that capacity, she researches, develops resources, and presents webinar and in person educational sessions on a variety of health and safety topics specific to the agricultural workforce. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa.

    She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training.

  • Emergency Planning for Farm Operations

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Safety planning is one of the most difficult to justify because you never know the amount of time, money, or lives you are saving for accidents that don't happen. With more children likely to be on the farm than ever before in history again this Fall, it is even more critical we take action for Emergency Response Planning. Shay Foulk, a Safety Consultant with Ag View Solutions, will speak on how to navigate the difficult conversations, implementation, and sustainability of Emergency Response Planning. No different than any other business, Shay works with farming operations to assess risks, identify solutions, and implement them in a manner that is practical and easy for farms.

    Summary: Safety planning is one of the most difficult to justify because you never know the amount of time, money, or lives you are saving for accidents that don't happen. With more children likely to be on the farm than ever before in history again this Fall, it is even more critical we take action for Emergency Response Planning. Shay Foulk, a Safety Consultant with Ag View Solutions, will speak on how to navigate the difficult conversations, implementation, and sustainability of Emergency Response Planning. No different than any other business, Shay works with farming operations to assess risks, identify solutions, and implement them in a manner that is practical and easy for farms. 

    Intended Audience:
     Farm Managers, Operators, and those who live or work on the farm, or those who advise this audience

    Objectives:
     At the end of this webinar participants will be familiar with....
    • Emergency Response Planning
    • Safety Implementation
    • Contacts and Resources
    • Program availability
    • How to change the farm NOW


    Thank you to our generous program sponsors:

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    Shay Foulk

    Safety Consultant; Ag View Solutions

    Shay Foulk is a former Army Ranger. He returned to the farm and brought back planning and safety procedures that can be easily implemented for safe working environments. He helps coach farming operations on practical safety, implementation, and follow-thru.

     

  • Teach Your Way: Open Source Ag Health and Safety Curriculum

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Learn how to access AgriSafe’s free online trainings for use in the classroom. Educators can be certified to train on six AgriSafe modules (targeted for ages 16-23). Generous sponsorship allows AgriSafe to provide free course instruction and training materials. Under our open share platform, once certified, you may use the training materials in your classroom setting. Our end goal is to build the capacity of local agricultural educators, rural health professionals and rural leaders to train young workers.

    Learn how to access AgriSafe’s free online trainings for use in the classroom. Educators can be certified to train on six AgriSafe modules (targeted for ages 16-23). Generous sponsorship allows AgriSafe to provide free course instruction and training materials. Under our open share platform, once certified, you may use the training materials in your classroom setting. Our end goal is to build the capacity of local agricultural educators, rural health professionals and rural leaders to train young workers.

    Objectives: 

         - Discuss the importance of training youth and young adults in agricultural safety

         - Highlight Invest in Your Health Curriculum and how to access resources

         - Preview new module on Mental Health for Youth and related resources.


    Thank you to our generous program sponsors:

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    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health Program Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Public Health Program Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety: Building a Toolkit for Child Agricultural Safety and Health

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Join us as we introduce participants to the world of child agricultural safety and health. After learning about benefits, risks and hazards of living, working and playing on farms, we will explore safety strategies for safeguarding children. We will help participants build a toolkit for safeguarding children and youth in the agricultural environment. All tools and resources used to build these toolkits are available free of charge. Intended Audience: Farm parents and supervisors/employers, ag safety and health professionals, agricultural industry organizations, Extension, agricultural youth focused organizations (e.g. FFA, 4-H), etc.

    Join us as we introduce participants to the world of child agricultural safety and health. After learning about benefits, risks and hazards of living, working and playing on farms, we will explore safety strategies for safeguarding children. We will help participants build a toolkit for safeguarding children and youth in the agricultural environment. All tools and resources used to build these toolkits are available free of charge.

    Intended Audience: Farm parents and supervisors/employers, ag safety and health professionals, agricultural industry organizations, Extension, agricultural youth focused organizations (e.g. FFA, 4-H), etc.

    Thank you to our program sponsors:

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    Melissa Ploeckelman

    Outreach Specialist, National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

    Melissa Ploeckelman is the outreach specialist for the National Children’s Center for Rural Agriculture Health and Safety and the National Farm Medicine Center and is a member of the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Heath communication team. Ploeckelman is well-known to the Wisconsin agricultural community. She comes from the Colby School District, where she was the agriculture instructor, FFA advisor and Youth Apprenticeship coordinator for six years. Ploeckelman grew up on her family’s dairy farm in Wisconsin.  While the farm was sold in 2019, her family still raises a variety of animals from pigs to goats, and chickens to alpacas.  They also have a large garden and enjoy cooking maple syrup.  Ploeckelman graduated from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls in 2010 with a degree in agricultural education. While attending college she served as the 2006-2007 State FFA Parliamentarian, was named 2008 Marathon County Fairest of the Fairs, and selected the 2009 State Fairest of the Fairs. She now enjoys her job focusing on rural and agricultural safety and health.  Ploeckelman is passionate to share her story as a means to keep farmers and their families safe! 

  • Lessons Learned in Covid-19 Prevention Efforts among Agriculture Workers and Employers

    Contains 6 Component(s)

    Agriculture work sites, shared worker housing, and shared worker transportation vehicles present unique challenges for preventing and controlling the spread of COVID-19. Consistent application of specific preparation, prevention, and management measures can help reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19. Best practices in Covid-19 testing and contact training will be shared to help agricultural producers identify strategies for responding on their farm. The CDC Covid-19 prevention guidance for agriculture will also be shared to assist employers in adopting recommendations to protect workers.

    Intended Audience: Agricultural employers, farm workers, farmers, ranchers, agribusiness, and other ag safety and health professionals

    Agriculture work sites, shared worker housing, and shared worker transportation vehicles present unique challenges for preventing and controlling the spread of COVID-19. Consistent application of specific preparation, prevention, and management measures can help reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19.  Best practices in Covid-19 testing and contact training will be shared to help agricultural producers identify strategies for responding on their farm. The CDC Covid-19 prevention guidance for agriculture will also be shared to assist employers in adopting recommendations to protect workers.

    Thank you to our generous program sponsors:

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    Chad Roy, PhD, MSPH

    Director, Infectious Disease Aerobiology, Director, Biodefense Research Programs at the Tulane National Primate Research Center, Professor of Microbiology & Immunology, Tulane School of Medicine

    Dr.Roy is a professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Tulane University Schoolof Medicine and also the Director of Infectious Disease Aerobiology at theTulane National Primate Research Center. Dr. Roy's research focuses onrespiratory health and the aerobiology of infectious diseases.  Dr. Roy isa career aerobiologist, and has been active in numerous investigations for anarray of high consequence pathogens over the years.  Currently, Dr. Royand his laboratory enterprise are heavily engaged in the COVID-19 response incooperation with the US NIH, CDC, and other international partners.  Heserves on numerous ad hoc SME panels contributing to the ongoingresponse to COVID-19, including as an invited panelist with the World HealthOrganizations’ (WHO) committee on development of animal models for futuretesting of medical countermeasures.    

    Jennifer M. Lincoln, PhD, CSP

    CAPT (retired), US Public Health Service, Associate Director, Office of Agriculture Safety and Health, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

    Jennifer M. Lincoln, PhD, CSP, is the Associate Director for the NIOSH Office of Agriculture Safety and Health and Co-Chair of the NORA Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing Sector Council. Dr. Lincoln’s career has focused on scientific research and leadership to develop tailored risk-reduction interventions for high-risk work, especially in the prevention of traumatic injuries among workers in the commercial fishing industry, but also aviation, oil and gas, and wildland firefighting. In 2007, she created the NIOSH Commercial Fishing Safety Research and Design Program and in 2015 established the Center for Maritime Safety and Health Studies, which, in partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard, has led to a substantial decline in commercial fishing deaths. Dr Lincoln grew up in rural Indiana and after a 28-year career in Alaska with the US Public Health Service, she and her husband moved back to settle on their 80 acres earlier this year.

    Doug Trout, MD, MHS

    CDC COVID-19 WSH Team Chief, Hazard Evaluations and Technical Assistance Branch, DFSE NIOSH

    Medical officer with CDC / NIOSH; Branch Chief with the NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation Program; Active in many areas of CDC COVID-19 response activitie

    Natalie Roy, MPH

    AgriSafe Executive Director

    As Executive Director of AgriSafe for over sixteen years, Natalie Roy utilizes her public health training to improve the quality of health care offered to farm families. Natalie holds a Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She is pleased to work in the area of agricultural health as it relates to her experience growing up on a farm in Canterbury New Hampshire.

  • Mental Health Innovations in Agricultural Communities

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    This session is a panel presentation that communicates a forward vision of agricultural mental health. The presenters will explore the development of a farmer specific hotline, the efforts of a state department of agriculture, and unique examples that coalesce around a central objective-to meet the mental health needs of agricultural producers and their families. Hopefully, this session will spark discussion, ideas, collaborations between community and governmental groups to thoughtfully build a mental health safety net for the people that feed America.

    Summary: This session is a panel presentation that communicates a forward vision addressing disparities in agricultural mental health. The presenters will explore the development of a farmer specific hotline, the efforts of a state department of agriculture, and suggested strategies to address a central objective-to meet the mental health needs of ALL agricultural producers and their families. This session is designed to spark discussion, ideas, collaborations between community and governmental groups to thoughtfully build a mental health safety net across cultures.

    Intended Audience: Ag producers, farmers, ranchers, farm families, rural and ag community members, rural and ag policy makers, health and safety professionals 

    Objectives: At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to...

    1. Describe diverse, cultural characteristics of rural and agricultural communities to inform innovation in mental health.

    2. Understand the scope of work required to develop a farmer specific hotline.

    3. Discuss program strategies that could address the gaps of mental health programming.

    4. Explore state-level efforts to address disparities in mental health and agriculture.


    Thank you to our generous program sponsors:

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    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

    Dr. Jewel H. Bronaugh,

    Commissioner- Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

    In April 2018, Governor Ralph Northam appointed Dr. Jewel H. Bronaugh as the 16th Commissioner of the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Dr. Bronaugh most recently served as the Executive Director of the Center of Agriculture Research, Engagement and Outreach (CAREO) at Virginia State University. She previously served as the Virginia State Executive Director for the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA), where she was appointed by Governor Terry McAuliffe and the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, Tom Vilsack, in July 2015. Dr. Bronaugh is the first African American female in the nation to serve in this capacity.

    Prior to being appointed to FSA, she served as the Dean of the College of Agriculture at Virginia State University (VSU) for 5 years, where she led the strategic vision for the Extension and Research divisions and the academic departments. In her earlier career at VSU, she was the Associate Administrator of Cooperative Extension and a 4-H Youth Development Specialist, where she developed and delivered programs that addressed issues of bullying among youth.

    In spring 2019, she launched the Farmer Stress Task Force, organized in partnership with agricultural and health related agencies and organizations, to raise awareness and coordinate resources to address farmer stress and mental health challenges in Virginia.

    Joan M. Mazur, PhD

    Professor, Southeast Center for Agriculture Health and Injury Prevention, University of Kentucky

    Joan M. Mazur, Ph.D. is Professor of Instructional Systems Design in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction where she also serves as a Director of the Digital Learning & Design P-20 Innovation Lab. Her research is primarily interdisciplinary and has focused on narrative forms of instruction, mediating technologies and inquiry, and recently on teacher professional development and coaching for innovative classroom learning technology as part of the P-20 Innovation Initiative. She teaches graduate classes in digital gaming, social media design, technology integration in the secondary schools and mixed methods research. She has collaborated with the Colleges of Engineering, Agriculture, Public Health, and Arts and Sciences and numerous public school districts on various projects, funded by NSF, NIOSH, DoDEA and various private foundations including BellSouth and James Graham Brown.

    Joan began at UK in 1993 after receiving her doctoral degree from Cornell University in Curriculum & Instruction. Mazur lives with her husband on their farm in Willisburg in Washington County.

  • Planting the Seeds of Tractor and Machinery Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Tractors and machinery have traditionally been a leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries on and around farms and ranches. The Planting the Seeds of Tractor and Machinery Safety webinar will cover the basic hazards associated with agricultural tractors and machinery and how to prevent injuries from these hazards.

    Intended Audience: Safety professionals, educators, students, Ag workers, Ag business employees and health care workers.

    Tractors and machinery have traditionally been a leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries on and around farms and ranches. The Planting the Seeds of Tractor and Machinery Safety webinar will cover the basic hazards associated with agricultural tractors and machinery and how to prevent injuries from these hazards.

    Learning objectives
    1. Participants will understand the hazards associated agricultural tractors and machinery.
    2. Participants will learn ways to reduce the hazards associated agricultural tractors and machinery.
    3. Participants will learn where to find resources for teaching and training on the topic of tractor and machinery safety.

    Thank you to our generous program sponsors:

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    Aaron M. Yoder, PhD

    Associate Professor, Environmental, Agricultural and Occupational Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Extension - Biological Systems Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

    Aaron Yoder grew up in central Pennsylvania where he spent time working on his grandfather's farm. He graduated from Penn State University with a BS and MS in Agricultural Systems Management and Environmental Pollution Control, respectively. He went on to complete a PhD from Purdue University in Agricultural and Biological Engineering where he focused on ergonomic evaluation of assistive technology for AgrAbility clients. Aaron is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental, Agricultural and Occupational Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and works with projects through the NIOSH funded Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health. He is the president of the International Society for Agricultural Safety and Health and serves on the Board of Directors of the Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America and Progressive Agriculture Foundation. Dr. Yoder also maintains leadership roles in the eXtension.org/AgSafety Community of Practice, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers and the USDA NCERA197 Committee for establishing priorities at Land Grant University for agricultural safety and health research and education programs. More information on Dr. Yoder can be found at: 

  • The Impact of Climate-Related Hazards on Mental Health

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Extreme weather and climate events can lead to negative human health outcomes. Although the initial outcomes from these natural hazards are typically obvious, the long lasting impacts can be more difficult to identify because of the diversity of potential health burdens during the recovery phase. Mental health outcomes are one of the more complex relationships with natural hazards. The goal of this presentation is to build the link between human health and extreme weather and climate events. The discussion will be focused on rural populations.

    Summary: Extreme weather and climate events can lead to negative human health outcomes. Although the initial outcomes from these natural hazards are typically obvious, the long lasting impacts can be more difficult to identify because of the diversity of potential health burdens during the recovery phase. Mental health outcomes are one of the more complex relationships with natural hazards. The goal of this presentation is to build the link between human health and extreme weather and climate events. The discussion will be focused on rural populations.

    Intended Audience: farmers, ranchers, health and safety professionals, ag producers, agribusiness, rural mental health professionals

    Objectives: At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to.....

    - Describe the impact of climate on human health outcomes

    - Identify populations at risk for climate disasters

    - Better understand mechanisms of climate disasters

    - Understand the secondary health impacts from climate disasters

    - Explore the role that these issues play on mental health

    Thank you to our generous program sponsor:

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    Jesse E. Bell, Ph.D

    Claire M. Hubbard Professor of Health and Environment, Faculty Fellow, Daugherty Water For Food Global Institute, Department of Environmental, Agricultural, and Occupational Health, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center

    Dr. Jesse E. Bell is the Claire M. Hubbard Professor of Health and Environment in the Department of Environmental, Agricultural, and Occupational Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. His research explores the relationships of climate and extreme weather on natural and human processes. He served as a lead author for the U.S. Global Change Research Program report “The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A Scientific Assessment” that was released by the White House in 2016. Before coming to UNMC, Dr. Bell developed a joint position between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In this role, he led and coordinated a variety of projects related to climate impacts on human health. He also served on the White House OSTP Pandemic Prediction and Forecast Working Group. Dr. Bell is a Daugherty Water for Food Global Institute Faculty Fellow and adjunct faculty for the Department of Environmental Health at Emory University. His Ph.D. is from the University of Oklahoma.