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  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/19/2022

    Farmers and ranchers in four states (Texas, Wyoming, Pennsylvania, and Virginia) can now access a crisis service helpline 24/7 staffed by trained professionals. Join AgriSafe and ViaLink for a 30-minute overview of this newly formed AgriStress Helpline for Farmers and Ranchers. The AgriStress Helpline is an evidence-based suicide prevention lifeline designed for agricultural communities.

    Farmers and ranchers in four states (Texas, Wyoming, Pennsylvania, and Virginia) can now access a crisis service helpline 24/7 staffed by trained professionals. Join AgriSafe and ViaLink for a 30-minute overview of this newly formed AgriStress Helpline for Farmers and Ranchers.  The AgriStress Helpline is an evidence-based suicide prevention lifeline designed for agricultural communities.

    Participants will learn how:

    This innovative crisis model serves a critical unmet need.
    The model was designed by credentialed professionals trained to respond appropriately to the agricultural community, through a program developed by experts in mental health, agriculture production, mediation, and financial analysis.
    The crisis line utilizes a "care navigation" process where the helpline responders: triage for safety and provide de-escalation using a crisis intervention model; provide emotional support and coping techniques; and, when necessary, direct callers to the appropriate resources for their situation.
    The expansion to new states and eventually a national helpline is both economical and feasible. 

    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN (Moderator)

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

    Sherrard Crespo, LCSW (Moderator)

    Director of Outreach and PCAL, VIA LINK/2-1-1

    Sherrard Crespo is a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) who obtained her Masters Degree in Social Work from Louisiana State University in 2017. Her professional background is highlighted by her work with suicide education, prevention, intervention, and postvention. Sherrard is currently employed with VIA LINK in the position of Director of Outreach and Preventing Child Abuse where her current duties include: clinical oversight of
    VIA LINK's 24/7 contact center, VIA LINK internal training on suicide risk assessment, community outreach and education on VIA LINK services as well as specialized skills and information on suicide, crisis intervention, and trauma. She also facilitates VIA LINK's two support groups: Survivors of Suicide Loss and “Real Talk” a support group for teens with suicide ideation. She is also the director for VIA LINK’s Preventing Child Abuse Program in which her current focus includes education and advocacy for the community to support Louisiana families and prevent child abuse. Her professional clinical skills also include seeing individual clients who are bereaved by suicide loss as well as providing consultation for
    clients who are assessed for suicide risk.

    Natalie Roy, MPH (Moderator)

    AgriSafe Executive Director

    AgriSafe Network

    As Executive Director of AgriSafe for over twenty years, Natalie Roy utilizes her public health training to improve the quality of health care offered to farm families. Natalie holds a Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She is pleased to work in the area of agricultural health as it relates to her experience growing up on a farm in Canterbury New Hampshire.

  • Contains 5 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/01/2022

    Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farm workers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team and effectively communicating within that team are essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Summary: Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farmworkers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team, and effectively communicating within that team is essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Intended Audience: Supervisor or Managers: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns, and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    • Define zoonotic disease and identify various modes of transmission
    • Identify a minimum of four significant zoonotic diseases affecting the production agricultural population
    • Discuss warning signs and symptoms of major zoonotic diseases which have adverse effects for reproductive health
    • Locate a minimum of three recommended educational resources for use in training an agricultural workforce

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health Program Director, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Public Health Program Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Summary: Do farmers or ranchers really retire? Generational family operations frequently include the aging parents, the living legends of agriculture. Farmers and ranchers self-identify good health with the ability to work. The normal aging process slows down one’s ability to engage in meaningful activities physically and mentally, essentially to continue working. Swirl in the postmenopausal issues incurred by the female farmer, and a myriad of health hazards arise.

    Summary: Do farmers or ranchers really retire? Generational family operations frequently include the aging parents, the living legends of agriculture. Farmers and ranchers self-identify good health with the ability to work. The normal aging process slows down one’s ability to engage in meaningful activities physically and mentally, essentially to continue working. Swirl in the postmenopausal issues incurred by the female farmer, and a myriad of health hazards arise.

    Unlike men, who experience a gradual loss of bone mass as they age, women will lose over 30% of their bone mass in the first five years after menopause. Agriculture is a hazardous and uncertain profession. Women are working well past the age of menopause. Training measures should focus on avoiding common risk factors and preventative actions to decrease the likelihood of an injury. Workplace and home safety are achievable. We will also address other age-related changes such as vision, hearing, and sleep disturbance. Every member of the family operation will benefit from learning creative strategies and solutions to help the aging in-place seniors achieve wellness and self-fulfillment.

    Linda Emanuel, RN

    Community Health Nurse, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Good health advocacy has been at the heart of Linda’s essence from her formative years as a farm girl in eastern Nebraska. Graduating from Nebraska Methodist School of Nursing in 1985, she worked as an R.N. in a variety of acute care hospital settings for over 30 years. She and her husband Tom raised three sons on a successful row crop operation that has been able to welcome the next generation and their families home to continue to diversify their family business. Linda served as a Fellow in the Nebraska LEAD program and has also received agrimedicine training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Linda now serves on the advisory board for CS-CASH and a member of the AgriSafe team, as a Community Health Nurse.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The University of Texas Medical Branch conducted semi-structured interviews and observations with Gulf Coast shrimp fishermen to understand their healthcare experiences and needs as well as policies that are impacting their health. Community-based participatory research (CBPR), a relational model that values the participants as equal partners in research, dissemination, and implementation, guided the interviews. To address the lack of healthcare options for (im)migrants, and at the request of the seafood workers participating in the ongoing CBPR study, we successfully implemented and treated workers through a free mobile clinic. Many of these individuals had not been seen by a healthcare provider in years, highlighting the importance of community trust and rapport building when addressing interconnected health and safety issues. CBPR, when applied to high-risk occupational settings with underreached populations (e.g., (im)migrant workers), can improve health and prevent injury.

    Summary: The University of Texas Medical Branch conducted semi-structured interviews and observations with Gulf Coast shrimp fishermen to understand their healthcare experiences and needs as well as policies that are impacting their health. Community-based participatory research (CBPR), a relational model that values the participants as equal partners in research, dissemination, and implementation, guided the interviews. To address the lack of healthcare options for (im)migrants, and at the request of the seafood workers participating in the ongoing CBPR study, we successfully implemented and treated workers through a free mobile clinic. Many of these individuals had not been seen by a healthcare provider in years, highlighting the importance of community trust and rapport building when addressing interconnected health and safety issues. CBPR, when applied to high-risk occupational settings with underreached populations (e.g., (im)migrant workers), can improve health and prevent injury.

    Objectives: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to…
    – Describe the healthcare experiences and needs of (im)migrant seafood workers
    – Describe the principles of CBPR and how it can be applied to total worker health research
    – Discuss the difficulties of CBPR and ways to ensure the community is equitably engaged in all aspects of research-to-practice partnerships

    Intended Audience: Researchers, Practitioners, or Policymakers

    Continuing Education:

    The Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety offers 0.10 CEU or 1.0 contact hour/s of participation. This course is eligible for 1.0 CPH Recertification Credits and is sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. The following groups of professionals have been able to use these CEUs in the past; Industrial Hygiene (CIH), Certified Public Health Professional(CPH), Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Nursing (RN, LPN), Social Work (LSW), Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT), Audiology (ABA), and others. Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits.

    Shannon Guillot-Wright, PhD

    Assistant Professor & Vice Chair of Research and Health Policy, Dept of Family Medicine; Health Policy Research Director, Center for Violence Prevention, UTMB

    Shannon Guillot-Wright, PhD is Vice Chair of Research and Health Policy in the Department of Family Medicine, UTMB. She also serves as Director of Health Policy Research in UTMB’s Center for Violence Prevention. Her program of research focuses on structural violence, with a particular emphasis on the use of research evidence to foster equitable policies. She has conducted photo-ethnographic fieldwork with Filipino migrant seafarers to understand the systemic and structural production of health inequities as well as an ethnography exploring the use of research evidence in the U.S. Congress. Currently, she is conducting fieldwork with (im)migrant seafood workers on the Gulf Coast, studying how work is a structural and social determinant of health. Dr. Guillot-Wright has published on structural violence, including social determinants of health, health policy, migrant health, and racial/ethnic health inequities in international and national journals and received research support from the CDC, Texas Medical Center's Health Policy Institute, the State of Texas - Office of the Governor, SW Ag Center, and numerous national Foundations. She was a selected artist for the National Academy of Medicine's Visualize Health Equity gallery and her work has been featured in the New York Times, National Public Radio, Houston Public Radio, Texas Monthly, TIME Magazine, and Houston Chronicle. She sits on the American Public Health Association’s Action Board as well as the Advisory Board for the Children’s Defense Fund – Texas. Dr. Guillot-Wright has her PhD in the Medical Humanities from UTMB, MA in Human Rights from Columbia University, and completed her postdoctoral training at the Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Research Center at Penn State.

    Continuing Education:

    The Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety offers 0.10 CEU or 1.0 contact hour/s of participation. This course is eligible for 1.0 CPH Recertification Credits and is sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. The following groups of professionals have been able to use these CEUs in the past; Industrial Hygiene (CIH), Certified Public Health Professional(CPH), Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Nursing (RN, LPN), Social Work (LSW), Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT), Audiology (ABA), and others. Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits.

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  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/29/2022

    Summary: People who work outdoors are more likely to become dehydrated and experience heat-related illness or heat stress. Although illness from exposure to heat is preventable, thousands become sick from occupational heat exposure every year, and some cases are fatal. Agriculture is an industry where workers have suffered heat-related illnesses. Specific groups within the agricultural community, including pregnant women, older workers, and young children, could have elevated risks related to prolonged heat and humidity exposure. However, with proper information and preventative action, heat-related illness can be avoided for all populations in the agricultural community.

    Summary: People who work outdoors are more likely to become dehydrated and experience heat-related illness or heat stress. Although illness from exposure to heat is preventable, thousands become sick from occupational heat exposure every year, and some cases are fatal. Agriculture is an industry where workers have suffered heat-related illnesses. Specific groups within the agricultural community, including pregnant women, older workers, and young children, could have elevated risks related to prolonged heat and humidity exposure. However, with proper information and preventative action, heat-related illness can be avoided for all populations in the agricultural community.

    This training will identify the warning signs of heat-related illness and discuss prevention strategies, including protective clothing and equipment to protect agricultural workers from the risks associated with prolonged exposure to heat and humidity.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health Program Director, AgriSafe Network

    AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Public Health Program Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Agriculture is a hazardous industry associated with many occupational injuries and diseases. Workers may be exposed to various types of occupational hazards simultaneously, possibly increasing the risk of adverse health outcomes. Personal protective equipment (PPE) is critical for ensuring a safe working environment in agriculture. It is essential to utilize PPE that meets safety standards, is appropriate for your work, and is the proper fit. PPE is often designed with men in mind, making adequate fit and function problematic for women in agriculture. This training will address the different hazards in agricultural work and the appropriate PPE for women. Additionally, this training will review how to conduct both a respirator fit test and a fit check (seal check) procedure. This presentation aims to guide the selection and effectiveness of PPE worn by women in the agricultural field.

    Summary: Agriculture is a hazardous industry associated with many occupational injuries and diseases. Workers may be exposed to various types of occupational hazards simultaneously, possibly increasing the risk of adverse health outcomes. Personal protective equipment (PPE) is critical for ensuring a safe working environment in agriculture. It is essential to utilize PPE that meets safety standards, is appropriate for your work, and is the proper fit. PPE is often designed with men in mind, making adequate fit and function problematic for women in agriculture.

    This training will address the different hazards in agricultural work and the appropriate PPE for women. Additionally, this training will review how to conduct both a respirator fit test and a fit check (seal check) procedure. This presentation aims to guide the selection and effectiveness of PPE worn by women in the agricultural field.

    Intended Audience: Producers – This training is intended primarily for agricultural producers, including but not limited to farmers, ranchers, and any person or persons involved in some combination of raising field crops, orchards, vineyards, poultry, or other livestock.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Agriculture ranks among the most hazardous industries. Farmers are at very high risk for fatal and nonfatal injuries, and farming is one of few industries in which family members (who often share the work and live on the premises) are also at risk for fatal and nonfatal injuries. ATVs and UTVs are found on all types of farms; they are useful for agricultural work, but they also pose serious hazards to operators and passengers. Studies indicate that injured ATV/UTV passengers are more commonly female and youth and that helmet use is significantly lower for passengers. The focus of the training would be on ATV/UTV maintenance and safety features, personal protective equipment (PPE), load and weight considerations, operation on public roadways, as well as employee training and considerations for working alone.

    Summary: Agriculture ranks among the most hazardous industries. Farmers are at very high risk for fatal and nonfatal injuries, and farming is one of few industries in which family members (who often share the work and live on the premises) are also at risk for fatal and nonfatal injuries. ATVs and UTVs are found on all types of farms; they are useful for agricultural work, but they also pose serious hazards to operators and passengers. Studies indicate that injured ATV/UTV passengers are more commonly female and youth and that helmet use is significantly lower for passengers. The focus of the training would be on ATV/UTV maintenance and safety features, personal protective equipment (PPE), load and weight considerations, operation on public roadways, as well as employee training and considerations for working alone.

    Intended Audience: Producers- This training is intended primarily for agricultural producers, including but not limited to farmers, ranchers, and any person or persons involved in some combination of raising field crops, orchards, vineyards, poultry, or other livestock.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Contains 7 Component(s)

    Stigma exists across all age groups for those struggling with mental health. Navigation of the teen years in everyday situations can create angst and uncomfortable feelings that are difficult to express. Adding mental illness and mental crisis to a teen or young adult’s typical growth and development makes struggling with emotions, relationships, academic success, and safety more challenging. According to the CDC, rates of depression and anxiety climb significantly during the ages of 12-17. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youths in the United States. This module opens an introductory discussion of mental health among teens and young adults with guidance from an adult educator. Focus is placed on decreasing stigma, improving mental health literacy, and positive coping skills for teens and young adults. The module showcases a high school agricultural student’s understanding of the agricultural mental health crisis, helping to frame mental health distress to academic and future career success.

    Summary: Stigma exists across all age groups for those struggling with mental health. Navigation of the teen years in everyday situations can create angst and uncomfortable feelings that are difficult to express. Adding mental illness and mental crisis to a teen or young adult’s typical growth and development makes struggling with emotions, relationships, academic success, and safety more challenging. According to the CDC, rates of depression and anxiety climb significantly during the ages of 12-17. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youths in the United States. This module opens an introductory discussion of mental health among teens and young adults with guidance from an adult educator. Focus is placed on decreasing stigma, improving mental health literacy, and positive coping skills for teens and young adults. The module showcases a high school agricultural student’s understanding of the agricultural mental health crisis, helping to frame mental health distress to academic and future career success. 

     Objectives: After the module, teens and young adults will be able to....

    1. Understand the relationship of mental health to physical health and academic or career success 
    2. Recognize basic signs or symptoms that present when young adults experience mental stress 
    3. Identify healthy and unhealthy coping behaviors when faced with mental distress 
    4. Communicate their concerns when suspecting they or someone they know is experiencing a mental health crisis 

    Intended Audience: This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults.



    Invest in Your Health is supported by:

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    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Avian Influenza is a disease caused by viruses that can infect birds and people. Avian influenza viruses are routinely present in wild bird species and can be transmitted to backyard and commercial poultry, but very rarely to people. This presentation will focus on understanding the current state of the avian influenza outbreak in the US and provide recommendations for personal protective equipment for people who work with poultry and poultry products.

    Summary: Avian Influenza is a disease caused by viruses that can infect birds and people. Avian influenza viruses are routinely present in wild bird species and can be transmitted to backyard and commercial poultry, but very rarely to people. This presentation will focus on understanding the current state of the avian influenza outbreak in the US and provide recommendations for personal protective equipment for people who work with poultry and poultry products.

    Objectives: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to...

    • Describe avian influenza and how it can be transmitted between birds
    • Identify appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) to use when working with exposed or ill animals
    • Recognize the human signs and symptoms that may indicate an avian influenza exposure
    • Access evidence-based health & safety resources focused on safe practices when working around potential animal-borne diseases

    Intended Audience: Ag producers, farmers, poultry workers, veterinarians, healthcare providers, and anyone with exposure to poultry or other birds

    This webinar is offered in English with Spanish interpretation, provided courtesy of the National Center for Farmworker Health.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa. She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training. From 1997 to 2013, she provided agricultural occupational health services and program development for the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety.

    Chad Roy, PhD, MSPH

    Director, Infectious Disease Aerobiology, Director, Biodefense Research Programs at the Tulane National Primate Research Center, Professor of Microbiology & Immunology, Tulane School of Medicine

    Dr.Roy is a professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Tulane University Schoolof Medicine and also the Director of Infectious Disease Aerobiology at theTulane National Primate Research Center. Dr. Roy's research focuses onrespiratory health and the aerobiology of infectious diseases.  Dr. Roy isa career aerobiologist, and has been active in numerous investigations for anarray of high consequence pathogens over the years.  Currently, Dr. Royand his laboratory enterprise are heavily engaged in the COVID-19 response incooperation with the US NIH, CDC, and other international partners.  Heserves on numerous ad hoc SME panels contributing to the ongoingresponse to COVID-19, including as an invited panelist with the World HealthOrganizations’ (WHO) committee on development of animal models for futuretesting of medical countermeasures.    

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Changing climate, market conditions, and many other factors impact the work and health of livestock producers, ranchers, and farmers. When a natural disaster is added on top of other stressors, support from a variety of sources is needed. This webinar will focus on the USDA Disaster Assistance Programs available to support producers who are raising livestock.

    Summary: Changing climate, market conditions, and many other factors impact the work and health of livestock producers, ranchers, and farmers. When a natural disaster is added on top of other stressors, support from a variety of sources is needed. This webinar will focus on the USDA Disaster Assistance Programs available to support producers who are raising livestock.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…
    1. Understand the options available to Livestock producers through USDA Disaster Assistance programs
    2. Explore the timeline and process requirements for participation in these programs
    3. Summarize the program benefits to farmer/rancher mental and financial health

    Intended Audience: Livestock producers, ranchers, farmers, ag safety and health professionals

    Continuing Education:

    The Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety offers 0.10 CEU or 1.0 contact hour/s of participation. This course is eligible for 1.0 CPH Recertification Credits and is sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. The following groups of professionals have been able to use these CEUs in the past; Industrial Hygiene (CIH), Certified Public Health Professional(CPH), Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Nursing (RN, LPN), Social Work (LSW), Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT), Audiology (ABA), and others. Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits.

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    Jack Field, B.S.

    Risk Advisor, CKP Insurance

    Jack is a member of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Washington Cattle Feeder’s Association (WCFA), and Washington Cattlemen’s Association and is currently the Executive Director of the WCFA. Jack previously was employed as the Executive Vice President of the Washington Cattlemen’s Association from 2004-2017. Jack also represents the WCFA in Olympia throughout the legislative session. Jack works closely with Cattle Feeders throughout the Pacific Northwest to address the challenges that face the cattle feeding community. Jack is also an agent with CKP Insurance, LLC.

    Jack has been working with CKP Insurance since 2017 and has had the opportunity to work with cattlemen and hay producers throughout WA, OR and ID assisting them with the Pasture Range and Forage Program and the Livestock Risk Protection Program. Jack graduated with a Bachelors of Science degree in Agricultural Science and Technology and a minor in Agricultural Systems Management from the University of Idaho in 1999.
    Prior to joining the Washington Cattlemen's Association in 2004, he was an assistant farm manager on a 2,200-acre irrigated row crop in White Swan, Washington. Jack was raised on a small cow/calf operation in central Oregon.  Jack resides in Yakima, WA with his wife Skye where they own and operate Lazy JF Cattle Co. a small commercial cow/calf cattle operation.

    Continuing Education: The Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety offers 0.10 CEU or 1.0 contact hour/s of participation. This course is eligible for 1.0 CPH Recertification Credits and is sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. The following groups of professionals have been able to use these CEUs in the past; Industrial Hygiene (CIH), Certified Public Health Professional(CPH), Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Nursing (RN, LPN), Social Work (LSW), Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT), Audiology (ABA), and others. Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits.

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