Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Category
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Contains 6 Component(s) Recorded On: 12/02/2021

    Thirty-six percent of the 3.4 million producers counted in the census are women. Education will focus on all women including farmworker women and their employers on reporting violent incidents to authorities, making employees aware of their legal rights, safe work practices, medical referrals, treatment, and options including counseling if needed. Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Thirty-six percent of the 3.4 million producers counted in the census are women. Education will focus on all women including farmworker women and their employers on reporting violent incidents to authorities, making employees aware of their legal rights, safe work practices, medical referrals, treatment, and options including counseling if needed.
    Intended Audience: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators,  health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting. 
    Objectives Upon completion of this webinar, participants will understand the following concepts:
    1. The scope and nature of workplace violence occurring in agriculture today.
    2. Employers' responsibilities in addressing workplace violence and implementing preventive measures.
    3. Effective strategies and interventions that can make the workplace safer and more responsive to employee-victims.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Contains 6 Component(s)

    Stigma exists across all age groups for those struggling with mental health. Navigation of the teen years in everyday situations can create angst and uncomfortable feelings that are difficult to express. Adding mental illness and mental crisis to a teen or young adult’s typical growth and development makes struggling with emotions, relationships, academic success, and safety more challenging. According to the CDC, rates of depression and anxiety climb significantly during the ages of 12-17. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youths in the United States. This module opens an introductory discussion of mental health among teens and young adults with guidance from an adult educator. Focus is placed on decreasing stigma, improving mental health literacy, and positive coping skills for teens and young adults. The module showcases a high school agricultural student’s understanding of the agricultural mental health crisis, helping to frame mental health distress to academic and future career success.

    Summary: Stigma exists across all age groups for those struggling with mental health. Navigation of the teen years in everyday situations can create angst and uncomfortable feelings that are difficult to express. Adding mental illness and mental crisis to a teen or young adult’s typical growth and development makes struggling with emotions, relationships, academic success, and safety more challenging. According to the CDC, rates of depression and anxiety climb significantly during the ages of 12-17. Suicide is the second leading cause of death of youths in the United States. This module opens an introductory discussion of mental health among teens and young adults with guidance from an adult educator. Focus is placed on decreasing stigma, improving mental health literacy, and positive coping skills for teens and young adults. The module showcases a high school agricultural student’s understanding of the agricultural mental health crisis, helping to frame mental health distress to academic and future career success. 

     Objectives: After the module, teens and young adults will be able to....

    1. Understand the relationship of mental health to physical health and academic or career success 
    2. Recognize basic signs or symptoms that present when young adults experience mental stress 
    3. Identify healthy and unhealthy coping behaviors when faced with mental distress 
    4. Communicate their concerns when suspecting they or someone they know is experiencing a mental health crisis 

    Intended Audience: This Train the Trainer course is designed for teachers, Extension staff, 4H and FFA leaders and others who work with young adults.



    Invest in Your Health is supported by:

    image

    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

  • Contains 34 Component(s)

    AgriSafe is offering this Train-the-Trainer series to anyone who works with youth (ages 14-23 years). The series of modules will walk you through 6 target areas and includes an instructor guide after completing each topic.

    AgriSafe offers Invest in Your Health Trainer Exchange where educators can be certified to train on six AgriSafe modules (targeted for ages 14-23). AgriSafe provides the course instruction and training materials. Under our open share platform, once certified, educators would be free to use the training materials in their classroom setting. Our end goal is to build the capacity of local agricultural educators, rural health professionals and rural leaders to train young workers.  

    Currently, AgriSafe offers six training modules:   

    1. Say What? Protecting your Hearing
    2. Cover Up! Head to Toe Personal Protective Equipment
    3. Stay Cool! Prevention of Heat Related Illness
    4. Stop Zoonosis it its Tracks- Prevention of Zoonosis
    5. Where Y’at-Using Mapping to Define Hazards in Agriculture
    6. Cultivating a Healthy Mind: Mental Wellness for Youth

    Utilizing an open share curriculum model, AgriSafe is expanding access to ag safety and health curriculum to a wide variety of health and safety instructors including parents, teachers and employers.  This curriculum built with a classroom audience in mind, has been utilized in a variety of ways to train youth and new employees in agriculture alike..

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

    Invest in Your Health is supported by:

    image

           


    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Health Communications Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Health Communications Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education, Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

    Natalie Roy, MPH

    AgriSafe Executive Director

    As Executive Director of AgriSafe for over twenty years, Natalie Roy utilizes her public health training to improve the quality of health care offered to farm families. Natalie holds a Masters in Public Health from Tulane University. She is pleased to work in the area of agricultural health as it relates to her experience growing up on a farm in Canterbury New Hampshire.

    Tara Haskins, DNP, RN

    Total Farmer Health Director, AgriSafe Network

    Tara Haskins is a registered nurse with 33 years of clinical experience. She holds a Masters in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Forensics. For the last 12 years, she has been a nurse educator in psychiatric-mental health concepts. Tara has experience in crisis/suicide intervention and addiction treatment in both outpatient and inpatient settings. She is a 2018 AgriSafe Nurse Scholar graduate. As a National Rural Health Association Fellow, she collaborated on a policy paper on disaster preparedness and response in rural communities. Tara continues to advocate at a national level for rural health services and programming.

    Marjorie McCullagh, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC, COHN-S, FAAOHN, FAAN

    Professor and Occupational Health Nursing Program Director, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    Marjorie McCullagh is Professor in the School of Nursing. She holds a PhD in nursing from the University of Michigan and has 20 years of clinical, teaching, and research experience in hearing conservation. Dr. McCullagh's career has focused on occupational health and safety, particularly as it relates to use of personal protection devices among farm operators and their families. Since 1985 she has had an active program of research in mitigating hazardous occupational exposures. She has conducted several randomized clinical trials, comparing the effectiveness of several approaches to influencing use of personal protective equipment. Dr. McCullagh is an associate professor and Director of the Occupational Health Nursing program at the University of Michigan School of Nursing.

    Linda Emanuel, RN

    Community Health Nurse, AgriSafe Network

    Good health advocacy has been at the heart of Linda’s essence from her formative years as a farm girl in eastern Nebraska. Graduating from Nebraska Methodist School of Nursing in 1985, she worked as an R.N. in a variety of acute care hospital settings for over 30 years. She and her husband Tom raised three sons on a successful row crop operation that has been able to welcome the next generation and their families home to continue to diversify their family business. Linda served as a Fellow in the Nebraska LEAD program and has also received agrimedicine training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Linda now serves on the advisory board for CS-CASH and a member of the AgriSafe team, as a Community Health Nurse.

    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett, MS, DVM Candidate, Michigan State University

    Katelyn Haydett has her BS in Molecular Biology from Defiance College, MS in Environmental Toxicology from Texas Tech University, and is currently a DVM candidate at Michigan State University. Her passion for public health began during a water testing project in Tanzania, Africa and has continued to evolve and include research focused on wildlife diseases and vector-borne zoonoses. Katelyn also served as a member of the AgriSafe Young Advisors Council, from 2016-2017. In her role as a rural leader, she assisted AgriSafe in design and launching of educational initiatives that can reduce farm related illness, injury and fatalities.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa. She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training. From 1997 to 2013, she provided agricultural occupational health services and program development for the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety.

  • Contains 3 Component(s)

    Summary: Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are very effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Now that there are approved, authorized, and recommended COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, accurate vaccine information is critical. COVID-19 vaccination will be an important tool to help stop the pandemic. Safety is a top priority, and there are many reasons to get vaccinated. Dr. Lisa Morici will talk about how the vaccines have been developed, the safety and efficacy information from clinical trials and real-world data, and why vaccination works to help stop the spread of COVID-19. She will provide updates on the vaccines, including the 3 dose recommendation for immunocompromised individuals, updates on booster doses, and status on vaccines for children. Please join us in this important webinar so together we can reduce the spread of misinformation and help agricultural communities access the COVID-19 vaccine.

    Summary: Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are very effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Now that there are approved, authorized, and recommended COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, accurate vaccine information is critical. COVID-19 vaccination will be an important tool to help stop the pandemic. Safety is a top priority, and there are many reasons to get vaccinated.

    Dr. Lisa Morici will talk about how the vaccines have been developed, the safety and efficacy information from clinical trials and real-world data, and why vaccination works to help stop the spread of COVID-19. She will provide updates on the vaccines, including the 3 dose recommendation for immunocompromised individuals, updates on booster doses, and status on vaccines for children. Please join us in this important webinar so together we can reduce the spread of misinformation and help agricultural communities access the COVID-19 vaccine.

    Intended Audience: Agriculture producers, safety and health professionals, health care providers, other people working in agriculture.

    Lisa Morici, PhD

    Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tulane University

    Tulane University

    Dr. Lisa Morici is a tenured Associate Professor in the Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology at Tulane University School of Medicine. Her research program focuses on the development of next generation vaccines for biodefense and emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases. Dr. Morici has successfully moved candidate vaccines from the discovery stage to planned phase 1 clinical trials. Her vaccine research program is currently supported by the National Institutes of Health and the Dept. of Defense.

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/17/2021

    Anhydrous ammonia (NH3) is an effective nitrogen crop fertilizer used throughout the Midwest and beyond. Anhydrous ammonia is potentially dangerous, as it seeks water from the nearest source, which may be the human body – especially the eyes, lungs, and skin because of their high moisture content. Few problems occur when anhydrous ammonia is handled properly and applied as intended. However, it is important for all individuals working with this type of fertilizer to understand the potential health risks, necessary safety precautions, and proper response in the event of an exposure.

    Summary: Anhydrous ammonia (NH3) is an effective nitrogen crop fertilizer used throughout the Midwest and beyond.  Anhydrous ammonia is potentially dangerous, as it seeks water from the nearest source, which may be the human body – especially the eyes, lungs, and skin because of their high moisture content.  Few problems occur when anhydrous ammonia is handled properly and applied as intended.  However, it is important for all individuals working with this type of fertilizer to understand the potential health risks, necessary safety precautions, and proper response in the event of an exposure.

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is one of the last lines of defense for workers against Anhydrous Ammonia injuries. Women in all industries, including agriculture, have trouble finding and purchasing respiratory protective equipment that fits and is safe and comfortable wear. The National Safety Council, in a 2019 publication of Safety and Health, reported OSHA documentation indicating the lack of a full range of PPE, as well as, employers’ limited knowledge of PPE designed for women – as some of the reasons for the difficulty.  Focus of the training is on anhydrous ammonia safety during transport and application, including the anatomy of the nurse tank and toolbar, safety inspection processes, hitching and unhitching safety, personal protective equipment (PPE), rural roadway safety, and first aid/emergency procedures.  Hazard communication and emergency action plans will also be addressed.

    Intended Audience: Farm/Ranch owner and operators, health and safety professionals, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the conclusion of the program, participants will be able to...

    • Identify the anatomy of a nurse tank and toolbar
    • Choose appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE)
    • Make use of a safety inspection process
    • Describe safety measures to follow during anhydrous transport and application
    • Apply rural roadway safety measures
    • Describe hitching and unhitching safety
    • Plan and utilize basic first aid/emergency procedures
    • Locate hazard communication plan and emergency action plan resources

    This material was produced under grant number SH-99084-SH0 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. 

    Dan Neenan, MBA, Paramedic

    NECAS Manager

    Dan joined NECAS staff in August 2002 as Director. Dan is a Paramedic Specialist, Firefighter II and EMS Instructor. He is a member of the Iowa Propane Board; Vice Chair of the Dubuque County Emergency Management Commission; and Treasurer, Dubuque County EMS. In his work at NECAS, Dan has developed several OSHA approved training programs as well as agricultural rescue programs. Safety programs include viticulture safety, enology safety, confined space-grain bin entry, prevention of grain storage fire and explosions, chemical safety, and confined space- manure pit safety. Rescue programs at NECAS include tractor rollover, combine auger rescue, grain bin rescue, and manure pit rescue. 

  • Contains 5 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/24/2021

    Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farm workers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team and effectively communicating within that team are essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Summary: Zoonotic Diseases are transmitted between farm animals and humans and can pose additional risks to those who are pregnant. According to the World Health Organization, more than half of all human pathogens are zoonotic and have represented nearly all emerging pathogens during the past decade. Farmers and farmworkers have higher levels of risk for contracting zoonotic diseases because of the frequency of their exposure to animals. Prevention is the best defense. Understanding how the disease transmission process works, building a team, and effectively communicating within that team is essential in preventing the spread of zoonotic disease. Women working in agriculture should be aware of the following special considerations during pregnancy, which animals are common carriers of zoonotic disease, symptoms of the disease(s), prevention measures, and pregnancy risks.

    Intended Audience: Supervisor or Managers: This training is intended primarily for health and safety professionals including but not limited to owner/operators, safety officers or specialists, managers, supervisors, safety coordinators, health safety and environmental interns, and any person or persons who serve as safety personnel in an agricultural setting.

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    • Define zoonotic disease and identify various modes of transmission
    • Identify a minimum of four significant zoonotic diseases affecting the production agricultural population
    • Discuss warning signs and symptoms of major zoonotic diseases which have adverse effects for reproductive health
    • Locate a minimum of three recommended educational resources for use in training an agricultural workforce

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05068-SH8 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Knesha Rose-Davison, MPH

    Public Health Program Director, AgriSafe Network

    Knesha currently serves as the Public Health Program Director with AgriSafe Network, a nonprofit organization that addresses occupational health issues within the agricultural community. With over twelve years of public health experience in maternal child health, health disparities, and health education. Knesha is passionate about serving vulnerable populations and ensuring health access and equity. Knesha obtained her Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (2002) with a minor in Chemistry and a Master’s of Public Health (2006) with an emphasis in Health Promotion from Northern Illinois University. In June 2016, she obtained a certificate in Agricultural Medicine which focused on rural occupational health and environmental health and safety. Knesha is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Louisiana Public Health Association where she serves in leadership.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Difficult conversations are something that people rarely look forward to. The reality is ignoring a situation and hoping that it will resolve itself, rarely works. Join us to learn how to confidently step into a tough conversation and promote open communication.

    Summary: Difficult conversations are something that people rarely look forward to. The reality is ignoring a situation and hoping that it will resolve itself, rarely works. Join us to learn how to confidently step into a tough conversation and promote open communication.

    Intended Audience: Anyone who wants to be more effective when faced with a tough conversation.

    Objectives: At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to...
    - Identify talking points before you start talking
    - Create a communication safe zone
    - Establish agreements and accountability

    Continuing Education is available for this webinar! The Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety offers 0.1 CEU or 1.0 contact hours of participation. This course is eligible for 1.0 CPH Recertification Credits and is sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. The following groups of professionals have been able to use these CEUs in the past; Industrial Hygiene (CIH), Certified Public Health Professional (CPH), Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Nursing (RN, LPN), Social Work (LSW), Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT), Audiology (ABA), and others. Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits.

    image
    image 

    image


    Rena Striegel, MBA

    President, Transition Point Business Advisors

    Rena is an internationally recognized business coach and consultant with more than 20 years of experience working directly with senior executives and entrepreneurs to identify and implement strategies that create growth and profitability.

    In her role as coach, strategist and facilitator, she leads client projects in the areas of Executive and business coaching, strategic planning, business planning, developing hiring strategies, and employee/leadership development.

    Rena has a passion for helping people make more money and have more fun! Her talent lies in helping business owners and executive make connections between concepts and application in order to help them achieve the level of operational excellence that allows resources to be focused on growth rather than on fixing problems.

    Her direct and honest bottom line approach has helped the leaders and management teams of international organizations like Business Network International (BNI), Xerox, Project Management Institute, Northwestern Mutual, United Way, Magna Corporation and many others improve their overall performance through clear executable strategies and higher employee contribution.

  • Contains 10 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/31/2021

    Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge. Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one-hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education.

    Summary: Respiratory protection strategies for women working in agriculture can be a challenge. Purchasing respiratory protective equipment and achieving proper fit is often difficult. This one-hour webinar program will address dangerous exposures in agricultural work and the importance of respiratory protective equipment for women. It will include training tips and evidence-based resources for use in clinical practice and worker education.

    Intended Audience: The primary audience for this program will be rural health care providers, educators, and agribusiness safety managers

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to…

    • List at least three sources of common agricultural respiratory hazards
    • Identify appropriate respiratory protection equipment for women working in agriculture
    • Access a minimum of three evidence-based resources for use in respiratory health and safety education for women working in agricultural environments.

    This material was produced under grant number SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Charlotte Halverson, RN, BSN, COHN-S

    Clinical Director, AgriSafe Network

    Charlotte serves as the Clinical Director for AgriSafe. Prior to this role, she worked for several years in hospital acute care settings and community education.  During those years, Charlotte developed and managed a Rural Outreach Health service and a Parish Health Ministry department serving nine counties in northeast Iowa. She is a "charter graduate" of the University of IA agricultural occupational medicine course, is certified in occupational hearing conservation and completed the NIOSH Spirometry training. From 1997 to 2013, she provided agricultural occupational health services and program development for the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    With 18+ hour workdays, the stress of the weather, dealing with markets and policies, and limited nutritious, one-handed dining options, it is easy to put healthy eating on the back burner during the busy seasons of harvest and planting. Food in the Field is an online nutrition program seeking to nutritiously feed those who feed us in the field and everywhere in between. This webinar will cover valuable tools to help you plan ahead for the busy seasons as well as research supporting the role of nutrition in mental health and wellbeing.

    Summary: With 18+ hour workdays, the stress of the weather, dealing with markets and policies, and limited nutritious, one-handed dining options, it is easy to put healthy eating on the back burner during the busy seasons of harvest and planting. Food in the Field is an online nutrition program seeking to nutritiously feed those who feed us in the field and everywhere in between. This webinar will cover valuable tools to help you plan ahead for the busy seasons as well as research supporting the role of nutrition in mental health and wellbeing.

    Intended Audience: Farmers and their families, anyone interested in learning about a healthy eating pattern

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to….

    • Identify how to implement small shifts towards a healthy eating pattern
    • Utilize tools to create a healthy food environment at home and during the busy seasons of harvest and planting
    • Understand the research supporting diet’s role in reducing depression symptoms


    image

    Tara Dunker, MS, RD

    Food, Nutrition, and Health Extension Educator – Nebraska Extension

    With over seven years of experience as a practicing registered dietitian, Tara has contributed to the field in various professional capacities. Previously, she worked for the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) as the state project coordinator for after-school nutrition, fitness & cooking program funded by a Children, Youth, and Families At-Risk (CYFAR) grant through the 4-H Youth Development Department at UNL. Her current role, however, is Extension Educator in Gage County covering the areas of food, nutrition, and health with a focus on healthy youth and families, food access, local food systems, and food safety. Outside of Gage County, her accountability region includes Jefferson, Johnson, Nemaha, Pawnee, Richardson, and Saline counties. She also serves in a volunteer capacity with the Nebraska Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics, working to advance the profession.

    Hannah Guenther, MA

    Food, Nutrition, and Health Extension Educator – Nebraska Extension

    Hannah Guenther is a Food, Nutrition, and Health Extension Educator for the University of Nebraska – Lincoln. Hannah began her career in Extension in June 2018 after leaving her Family and Consumer Science classroom. She has a degree in Dietetics from the University of Nebraska – Lincoln and a Master’s degree in Education from the University of Nebraska – Kearney. Although raised a city girl, Hannah is quickly adjusting to life on the farm and now dedicates a majority of her time on culinary education programs and work to helping the agriculture community make nutritious choices. Hannah is married to Adam Guenther and they have a 7-year-old daughter named Charlotte. They currently reside on a feedlot outside of West Point. 

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Hurricane Michael was the worst agriculture disaster in Georgia's history. The Department of Agriculture partnered with the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities and the Georgia Department of Public Health to develop outreach and educational materials to support farmer mental health in the state. This work continued during COVID-19. The Georgia Food and Feed Rapid Response Team (GA RRT) and partner agencies created a COVID-19 Food, Agriculture, and Hospitality Stress Workgroup to assess the impacts of stress and mental health across the nation through 2 online surveys. This presentation will cover partnership building, the evolution of farmer crisis resources in Georgia, and the development of outreach initiatives to inform food, agriculture, hospitality workers, and the public about the importance of the ABCs of Compassion Fatigue that includes awareness, balance, and connections.

    Summary: Hurricane Michael was the worst agriculture disaster in Georgia's history. The Department of Agriculture partnered with the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities and the Georgia Department of Public Health to develop outreach and educational materials to support farmer mental health in the state. This work continued during COVID-19. The Georgia Food and Feed Rapid Response Team (GA RRT) and partner agencies created a COVID-19 Food, Agriculture, and Hospitality Stress Workgroup to assess the impacts of stress and mental health across the nation through 2 online surveys. This presentation will cover partnership building, the evolution of farmer crisis resources in Georgia, and the development of outreach initiatives to inform food, agriculture, hospitality workers, and the public about the importance of the ABCs of Compassion Fatigue that includes awareness, balance, and connections.

    Intended Audience: Farmers, Public Health, Medical Providers (human and animal health), Emergency Managers, NGO, and General Public

    Objectives: At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to….

    • Understand how to build partnerships for farmer mental health
    • Understand COVID-19 Stress and Mental Health Workgroup project timeline
    • Recognize Behavioral and Mental Health impacts to farmers and other sectors during COVID-19
    • Identify Farmer Stress and Mental Health resources and outreach materials

    Continuing Education is available for this webinar! The Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety offers 0.1 CEU or 1.0 contact hours of participation. This course is eligible for 1.0 CPH Recertification Credits and is sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. The following groups of professionals have been able to use these CEUs in the past; Industrial Hygiene (CIH), Certified Public Health Professional (CPH), Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Nursing (RN, LPN), Social Work (LSW), Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT), Audiology (ABA), and others. Please contact your accrediting agency regarding any questions about receiving credits.

    image
    image 


    image

    Venessa Sims, MEP, GA-CEM, BA Psychology,

    Director of Emergency Management, Georgia Department of Agriculture

    Venessa A. Sims, MEP, GA-CEM is the Director of Emergency Management and Asst. Food and Feed Rapid Response Team (GA RRT) Program Manager for the Georgia Department of Agriculture.  Venessa supports emergency management and homeland security duties for the food and agriculture sector in Georgia.  She served as Unified Commander for the 2020 Final Four and Super Bowl LIII Food Defense Branch and as a representative of the Super Bowl LIII Logistics Committee.  Venessa serves on the FDA FSMA Intentional Adulteration Workgroup as a state representative, serves as the Georgia representative for the Southern Animal and Agriculture Disaster Response Alliance (SAADRA), and serves as the Past President for the National Alliance of State Animal and Agriculture Emergency Programs (NASAAEP).  She is a member of the Heritage Emergency Response Alliance (HERA).  Venessa also serves as a liaison as the Emergency Support Function (ESF) 11 Coordinator for the state of Georgia and coordinates response activities at the State Operations Center (SOC) for ESF 11 during activations, ESF 11 planning, and exercise support activities, and ESF 11 recovery endeavors.  Venessa chairs the Georgia Animal Coordination Group during disasters.  She served as a member of the Georgia Agriculture Recovery Task Force for Hurricane Michael, the worst agriculture disaster in Georgia history and has chaired stress and mental health education initiatives for the food and agriculture sectors.  Venessa is the Training & Exercise Coordinator for the Department where she works collaboratively with local, state, federal, and private sector partners to plan, train and implement exercises related to food and agriculture and public health.  She has served as Exercise Director, Planner, Player, Evaluator, Actor, After Action Report and Improvement Plan Point of Contact for Super Bowl LIII, Georgia Public Library Service, Cobb County Libraries, HERA, metro-Atlanta UASI, DOD, GEMA, FDA, CDC, Biowatch, food and agriculture, water, radiological, public health, and laboratory exercises.  Ms. Sims regularly presents at local, state, and national events on an array of topics related to food and agriculture planning, response, and recovery initiatives.